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I am looping through a directory and copying all files. Right now I am doing string.EndsWith checks for ".jpg" or ".png", etc . .

Is there a more elegant way of determining if a file is an image (any image type) without the hacky check above?

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Is there a reason the extension is not good enough? –  peterchen Mar 22 '09 at 7:58
    
See also: stackoverflow.com/questions/9354747/… –  Daryl Mar 5 '13 at 21:38
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5 Answers

up vote 22 down vote accepted

Check the file for a known header.

[Update: moving info out of comment]. The first eight bytes of a PNG file always contain the following (decimal) values: 137 80 78 71 13 10 26 10

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The first eight bytes of a PNG file always contain the following (decimal) values: 137 80 78 71 13 10 26 10. BTW, it was a quick google! –  Mitch Wheat Mar 22 '09 at 7:04
    
Wow, Clarion is still around! That's a surprise - I cut one or two teeth on Clarion back in about '95. –  ProfK Mar 22 '09 at 7:28
    
Note that the second through sixth characters are "PNG\r\n" –  Ben Voigt Jun 3 '13 at 20:30
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Check out System.IO.Path.GetExtension

Here is a quick sample.

public static readonly List<string> ImageExtensions = new List<string> { ".JPG", ".JPE", ".BMP", ".GIF", ".PNG" };

private void button_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    var folder = Environment.GetFolderPath(Environment.SpecialFolder.Desktop);
    var files = Directory.GetFiles(folder);
    foreach(var f in files)
    {
        if (ImageExtensions.Contains(Path.GetExtension(f).ToUpperInvariant()))
        {
            // process image
        }
    }
}
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erm, that's what the poster is saying he wants to do more than.... –  Mitch Wheat Mar 22 '09 at 4:24
    
He said he is checking to see if the string.EndsWith from what I gathered –  bendewey Mar 22 '09 at 4:24
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yeah, but it's still a string comparison. What if I rename a .jpf file to be .txt? –  Mitch Wheat Mar 22 '09 at 4:25
    
There are two possible interepretations of the question; either 'EndsWith' is hacky (in which case this answer is what the OP wants), or 'using the filename' is hacky, in which case @MitchWheat's answer is what the OP wants. I prefer Mitch's, but upvoted both. –  Brian Mar 22 '09 at 4:26
    
If you use the extension, be sure to convert it to lowercase before you do your comparisons. (Many digital cameras, for example, produce .JPG files.) –  Thomas Mar 22 '09 at 4:28
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See if this helps.

EDIT: Also, Image.FromFile(....).RawFormat might help. It could throw an exception if the file is not an image.

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Not exactly the answer you need. But if it’s the Internet then MIME type.

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I'm not sure what the performance drawback would be for this solution but couldn't you perform some image function on the file in a try block that would fail and fall to a catch block if it is not an image?

This strategy may not be the best solution in all situations but in the case that I am currently working with it has one major advantage: You can use whatever function that you plan to use to process the image (if it is an image) for the test function. In that way you can test all current image types but it would also extend to future image types without adding that new image extension to your supported image type list.

Does anyone see any drawbacks to this strategy?

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