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How can we escape single and double qoutes from a string? i want to escape single and double qoutes together i know who to pass them separately but dont know how to pass both of them. e.g str = "ruby 'on rails" " = ruby 'on rails"

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7 Answers 7

My preferred way is to not worry about the escaping and using %q (which acts like a single quoted string) or %Q for double quoted string behavior.


str = %q[ruby 'on rails"] # Single quoting
str2 = %Q[quoting with #{str}] # will insert variable
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It gives quoting with ruby 'on rails\" , i do not require that extra \ – Aleem Jul 15 '11 at 11:41
The escaping is shown only when you inspect it. Try to puts it instead. – Yossi Jul 15 '11 at 11:47

Use backslash to escape characters

str = "ruby \'on rails\" "
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You can use Q strings which allow you to use any delimiter you like:

str = %Q|ruby 'on rails" " = ruby 'on rails|
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I have search bar and parsed this "sdasd" "fsd" and its gives me = Q|sdasd" – Aleem Jul 15 '11 at 11:25
Any docs reference? – Numbers Aug 27 '14 at 14:07
>> str = "ruby 'on rails\" \" = ruby 'on rails"
=> "ruby 'on rails" " = ruby 'on rails"
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I would go with a heredoc if I'm starting to have to worry about escaping. It will take care of it for you:

string = <<MARKER 
I don't have to "worry" about escaping!!'"!!

MARKER delineates the start/end of the string. start string on the next line after opening the heredoc, then end the string by using the delineator again on it's own line.

This does all the escaping needed and converts to a double quoted string:

=> "I don't have to \"worry\" about escaping!!'\"!!\n"
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Note that a heredoc is a clumsy way to quote small strings. What this question needs is a meta-answer that lists all the quoting options along with their pros and cons. – Mark Thomas Jul 24 '14 at 15:21
Very true, Mark. I should have noted that it's gross to use them on small strings. – jbarr Jul 24 '14 at 15:53

Here is an example of how to use %Q[] in a more complex scenario:

    <meta property="og:title" content="#{@title}" />
    <meta property="og:description" content="#{@fullname}'s profile. #{@fullname}'s location, ranking, outcomes, and more." />
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Here is a complete list:

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