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I've only just started looking at Dapper.net and have just been experimenting with some different queries, one of which is producing weird results that i wouldn't expect.

I have 2 tables - Photos & PhotoCategories, of which are related on CategoryID

Photos Table

PhotoId (PK - int)  
CategoryId (FK - smallint)  
UserId (int)

PhotoCategories Table

CategoryId (PK - smallint)  
CategoryName (nvarchar(50))

My 2 classes:

public class Photo
{
    public int PhotoId { get; set; }
    public short CategoryId { get; set; }
    public int UserId { get; set; }
    public PhotoCategory PhotoCategory { get; set; }
}

public class PhotoCategory
{
    public short CategoryId { get; set; }
    public string CategoryName { get; set; }
{

I want to use multi-mapping to return an instance of Photo, with a populated instance of the related PhotoCategory.

var sql = @"select p.*, c.* from Photos p inner 
            join PhotoCategories c 
            on p.CategoryID = c.CategoryID where p.PhotoID = @pid";

cn.Open();
var myPhoto = cn.Query<Photo, PhotoCategory, Photo>(sql, 
               (photo, photoCategory) => { photo.PhotoCategory = photoCategory; 
                                           return photo; }, 
               new { pid = photoID }, null, true, splitOn: "CategoryID").Single();

When this is executed, not all of the properties are getting populated (despite the same names between the DB table and in my objects.

I noticed that if I don't 'select p.* etc.' in my SQL, and instead.

I explicitly state the fields.

I want to return EXCLUDING p.CategoryId from the query, then everything gets populated (except obviously the CategoryId against the Photo object which I've excluded from the select statement).

But i would expect to be able to include that field in the query, and have it, as well as all the other fields queried within the SQL, to get populated.

I could just exclude the CategoryId property from my Photo class, and always use Photo.PhotoCategory.CategoryId when i need the ID.

But in some cases I might not want to populate the PhotoCategory object when I get an instance of the Photo object.

Does anyone know why the above behavior is happening? Is this normal for Dapper?

share|improve this question
    
...but in some cases I might not want to populate the PhotoCategory object... - in these cases you can of course always create dummy PhotoCategory objects and just set their Id. Something I'm regularly doing when I only need to pass through identifier, but my methods require object instances. –  Robert Koritnik Jul 15 '11 at 23:36
    
Why don't you open an issue on Dapper's GitHub repo? It's more likely you'll get served faster and project owner's will have an issue logged. Because this surely seems common. My own tables are usually related with same column names. –  Robert Koritnik Jul 15 '11 at 23:39
    

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I just committed a fix for this:

    class Foo1 
    {
        public int Id;
        public int BarId { get; set; }
    }

    class Bar1
    {
        public int BarId;
        public string Name { get; set; }
    }

    public void TestMultiMapperIsNotConfusedWithUnorderedCols()
    {

        var result = connection.Query<Foo1,Bar1,
                      Tuple<Foo1,Bar1>>(
                         "select 1 as Id, 2 as BarId, 3 as BarId, 'a' as Name",
                         (f,b) => Tuple.Create(f,b), splitOn: "BarId")
                         .First();

        result.Item1.Id.IsEqualTo(1);
        result.Item1.BarId.IsEqualTo(2);
        result.Item2.BarId.IsEqualTo(3);
        result.Item2.Name.IsEqualTo("a");

    }

The multi-mapper was getting confused if there was a field in the first type, that also happened to be in the second type ... AND ... was used as a split point.

To overcome now dapper allow for the Id field to show up anywhere in the first type. To illustrate.

Say we have:

classes: A{Id,FooId} B{FooId,Name}
splitOn: "FooId"
data: Id, FooId, FooId, Name

The old method of splitting was taking no account of the actual underlying type it was mapping. So ... it mapped Id => A and FooId, FooId, Name => B

The new method is aware of the props and fields in A. When it first encounters FooId in the stream it does not start a split, since it knows that A has a property called FooId which needs to be mapped, next time it sees FooId it will split, resulting in the expected results.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Sam. That's great news, thanks. When will this updated version appear on github.com/SamSaffron/dapper-dot-net/commits/master ? I can't see it there at the moment? –  marcusstarnes Jul 19 '11 at 8:35
    
crap ... I did not push github yet ... one sec ... –  Sam Saffron Jul 19 '11 at 8:35
    
ok ... I pushed this to github –  Sam Saffron Jul 19 '11 at 8:54
    
Thanks Sam, that's sorted everything out :) –  marcusstarnes Jul 19 '11 at 9:17
    
As I thought then. Thanks for the fix. –  Mr Grok Jul 20 '11 at 8:47

I'm having a similar problem. It's to do with the fact that both the child and the parent have the same name for the field that is being split on. The following for example works:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var createSql = @"
            create table #Users (UserId int, Name varchar(20))
            create table #Posts (Id int, OwnerId int, Content varchar(20))

            insert #Users values(99, 'Sam')
            insert #Users values(2, 'I am')

            insert #Posts values(1, 99, 'Sams Post1')
            insert #Posts values(2, 99, 'Sams Post2')
            insert #Posts values(3, null, 'no ones post')
        ";

        var sql =
        @"select * from #Posts p 
        left join #Users u on u.UserId = p.OwnerId 
        Order by p.Id";

        using (var connection = new SqlConnection(@"CONNECTION STRING HERE"))
        {
            connection.Open();
            connection.Execute(createSql);

            var data = connection.Query<Post, User, Post>(sql, (post, user) => { post.Owner = user; return post; }, splitOn: "UserId");
            var apost = data.First();

            apost.Content = apost.Content;
            connection.Execute("drop table #Users drop table #Posts");
        }
    }
}

class User
{
    public int UserId { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}
class Post
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public int OwnerId { get; set; }
    public User Owner { get; set; }
    public string Content { get; set; }
}

But the following does not because "UserId" is used in both tables and both objects.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var createSql = @"
            create table #Users (UserId int, Name varchar(20))
            create table #Posts (Id int, UserId int, Content varchar(20))

            insert #Users values(99, 'Sam')
            insert #Users values(2, 'I am')

            insert #Posts values(1, 99, 'Sams Post1')
            insert #Posts values(2, 99, 'Sams Post2')
            insert #Posts values(3, null, 'no ones post')
        ";

        var sql =
        @"select * from #Posts p 
        left join #Users u on u.UserId = p.UserId 
        Order by p.Id";

        using (var connection = new SqlConnection(@"CONNECTION STRING HERE"))
        {
            connection.Open();
            connection.Execute(createSql);

            var data = connection.Query<Post, User, Post>(sql, (post, user) => { post.Owner = user; return post; }, splitOn: "UserId");
            var apost = data.First();

            apost.Content = apost.Content;
            connection.Execute("drop table #Users drop table #Posts");
        }
    }
}

class User
{
    public int UserId { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}
class Post
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public int UserId { get; set; }
    public User Owner { get; set; }
    public string Content { get; set; }
}

Dapper's mapping seems to get very confused in this scenario. Think this describes the issue but is there a solution / workaround we can employ (OO design decisions aside)?

share|improve this answer

I know this question is old but thought I would save someone 2 minutes with the obvious answer to this: Just alias one id from one table:

ie:

SELECT
    user.Name, user.Email, user.AddressId As id, address.*
FROM 
    User user
    Join Address address
    ON user.AddressId = address.AddressId
share|improve this answer

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