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Is there a quick and easy way to grep through an array finding the elements satisfying some test and remove these from the original array?

For example I would like

@a = (1, 7, 6, 3, 8, 4);
@b = grep_filter { $_ > 5 } @a;

# now @b = (7, 6, 8)
# and @a = (1, 3, 4)

In other words, I want to split an array into two arrays: those which match and those which do not match a certain condition.

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why? It's trivial, and easy to read, to create 2 arrays from @a (foreach (@a) { if( $_ > 5) { push @b, $_; } else { push @c, $_; } }) why do you need to do this "partially in place"? –  mirod Jul 15 '11 at 11:47
    
because I'm lazy. –  Juan A. Navarro Jul 15 '11 at 12:20
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4 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Know your libraries, mang.

use List::MoreUtils qw(part);
part { $_>5 } (1, 7, 6, 3, 8, 4)

returns

(
    [1, 3, 4],
    [7, 6, 8],
)
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Nice, pretty much what I was looking for. –  Juan A. Navarro Jul 15 '11 at 12:19
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my @a = (1, 7, 6, 3, 8, 4);
my (@b, @c);    

push @{ $_ > 5 ? \@b : \@c }, $_ for @a;
share|improve this answer
    
+1 because it is a nice solution that doesn't require any external libraries. –  Juan A. Navarro Jul 15 '11 at 12:18
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Using libraries is good, but for completeness, here is the function as specified in the question:

sub grep_filter (&\@) {
    my ($code, $src) = @_;
    my ($i, @ret) = 0;
    local *_;
    while ($i < @$src) {
        *_ = \$$src[$i];
        &$code
            ? push @ret, splice @$src, $i, 1
            : $i++
    }
    @ret
}

my @a = (1, 7, 6, 3, 8, 4);
my @b = grep_filter {$_ > 5} @a;

say "@a"; # 1 3 4
say "@b"; # 7 6 8
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Is this what you want?

@a = (1, 7, 6, 3, 8, 4);
@b = grep_filter { $_ > 5 } @a;
@a = grep_filter { $_ < 5 } @a;

do another grep with your condition negated.

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1  
< is not the strict negation of >. –  Alnitak Jul 15 '11 at 11:57
    
@Alnitak - you are right, i didn't mentioned that, but I put < and not <= in order for the code to work as expected –  Tudor Constantin Jul 15 '11 at 12:10
    
@Tudor: why would a logic-error make code working as expected, instead of the correct <=? –  pavel Jul 15 '11 at 12:38
    
@pavel looks to me like it only worked because 5 wasn't actually in the list. –  Alnitak Jul 15 '11 at 13:42
    
If 5 was in the list (with an odd number of elements), how would it have been split in 2 same length lists? –  Tudor Constantin Jul 15 '11 at 14:26
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