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Please help me make regular expression for positive decimal number with 0, 1 or 2 decimal places. It must allow comma and dot. For example it must allow:

0,01
0.01
0,1
1
1.1
1,11

but not allow:

-1
0.0
0,00
.01
0
1,111
1.111

I have this /(^\d*(?:\.|\,)?\d*[1-9]+\d*$)|(^[1-9]+\d*(?:\.|\,)\d*$)/ but I can`t find how to disallow more than 2 decimal places.

UPDATE Men, I must reject 0.0, 0 and etc.

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1  
Which programming language? –  Caner Jul 15 '11 at 13:11
    
I will use it in jQuery custom validation method, so it for javascript. –  Pavel F Jul 15 '11 at 13:29

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Edit 2: now disallows exactly 0,0.0, etc.

This matches at least one digit before the decimal place, followed by an optional decimal place, followed by 0-2 digits.

The negative lookahead looks for any flavor of absolute zero and prevents a match.

^(?!0*[.,]0*$|[.,]0*$|0*$)\d+[,.]?\d{0,2}$

This is the raw regex, so you'll need to escape it appropriately for your language. (For example, in some languages you need to double the \ slashes as \\.

/^(?!0*[.,]0*$|[.,]0*$|0*$)\d+[,.]?\d{0,2}$/
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Thank you! It's closer than other, but it still allows 0. And can I make it to reject like this "00", "000" and etc? –  Pavel F Jul 18 '11 at 9:37
    
@Agafon, try the new one. –  agent-j Jul 18 '11 at 18:40
    
Thank you very much! –  Pavel F Jul 19 '11 at 6:43

What you've got so far seems unnecessarily complicated to me. How about just

/^\d+([.,]\d{0,2})?$/

This is correct for every test case in the OP except for:

0.0
0,00
0

I don't see why you'd reject these.

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you can use the bracket notion to limit the number of digits:

\d{0,2} would mean any run of digits from a minimum of 0 to a maximum of 2

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+1 for speed. @ennuikiller is correct –  Bohemian Jul 15 '11 at 13:13
    
By itself, \d{0,2} erroneously matches 12 in the string 0.123456. (It also matches the 34 and the 56.) –  ridgerunner Jul 15 '11 at 13:57
    
@ridge ...and 23 and 45. –  Matt Ball Jul 15 '11 at 14:22
/^\d+([.,]\d{1,2})?$/

this will properly disallow these "unformatted" numbers .01, 3., etc.

if we have zero decimal place digits we probably as well don't want the decimal separator.

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This will do what you want.

I've added whitespace and comments and parentheses to clarify it:

(                   #
  ( 0*[1-9]\d*   )  # a non-zero integer portion, followed by
  ( [\.,]\d{1,2} )? # an optional fraction of 1 or 2 decimal digits
)                   # 
|                   # OR
(                   #
  ( 0+ )            # a zero integer portion, followed by
  (                 # an mandatory non-zero 1-2 digit fraction, consisting of
    [\.,]           # a decimal point
    (               # followed by 
      ( 0[1-9]   )  # a 0 followed by a 1-9,
      |             # OR
      ( [1-9]\d? )  # a 1-9 followed by an optional decimal digit
  )
)

The regular expression is suboptimal it something like 0000000000.01 will backtrack when it doesn't find a non-zero digit following the zeros in the integer portion, but it should work.

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Thank you for answer with good description –  Pavel F Jul 19 '11 at 6:44
    
I just realized my regex above will accept 0 w/o a fraction. Fixed! –  Nicholas Carey Jul 19 '11 at 17:03

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