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I'm trying to make it so that when a li element is hovered the background-position changes (which is working great) and when clicked it stays at the second active state (not working at all). It works if in the HTML the class "active" is applied to the element already. I've tried just about everthing I can think of and searched for a long time, but can't seem to figure it out.

HTML:

<div id="navigation">
    <ul>
      <li><a href="#">Mission</a></li>
      <li class="active"><a href="school.html">School</a></li>
      <li><a href="programs.html">Programs</a></li>
      <li><a href="instructors.html">Instructors</a></li>
      <li><a href="contact.html">Contact Us</a></li>

      <li class="bumpR"><a href="store.html">Store</a></li>
      <li><a href="blog.html">Blog</a></li>
    </ul>
  </div> <!-- end navigation -->

jQuery:

   $('#navigation li').not('li.active').mouseover(function() {
          $(this).stop().animate({backgroundPosition: '0px -40px'}, 500);
         // $(this).children('a').animate({opacity: .1}, 50);
          $(this).children('a').css({ 'color': 'black'});
         // $(this).children('a').delay(300).animate({opacity: 1}, 350); 
      })
     $('#navigation li').not('li.active').mouseleave(function() {
          $(this).stop().animate({backgroundPosition: '0px 0'}, 250);
          //$(this).children('a').animate({opacity: .1}, 25);
          $(this).children('a').css({ 'color': 'white'});
         // $(this).children('a').delay(150).animate({opacity: 1}, 175);
    });



    $('#navigation li').click(function() {
      $(this).addClass("active");    
    });

So for example hovering over "School" will correctly not animate the background position when the mouse leaves, but while clicking "Mission" will add the class "active" the mouseleave function still runs.

Any ideas why?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

.mouseleave() binds the handler to every element in the set. At the time that the handler is bound, only one <li> has class active, so only that element will not have the mouseleave handler bound.

Instead, use .live():

$('#navigation li:not(.active)').live('mouseleave', function ()
{
    $(this)
        .stop()
        .animate({backgroundPosition: '0px 0'}, 250)
        .children('a')
        .css({ 'color': 'white'});
});

or .delegate():

$('#navigation').delegate('li:not(.active)', 'mouseleave', function ()
{
    $(this)
        .stop()
        .animate({backgroundPosition: '0px 0'}, 250)
        .children('a')
        .css({ 'color': 'white'});
});

Edit

Fairly complete demo: http://jsfiddle.net/mattball/2mqSr/

share|improve this answer
    
Great, thank you. Am I right in saying that .live() forces a re-bind of the elements each time it is run - So I would only want to use it when I have to? –  austinkir Jul 16 '11 at 1:09
    
If I understand what you're asking: yes. There is no "forcing," though, .live() binds an event listener/handler to an element just like any other event bind function. The difference is that .live() and .delegate() leverage event bubbling to bind the listener to a common ancestor, which minimizes the number of individual event listeners, and means that the callback applies to elements matching the specified selectors now and in the future. –  Matt Ball Jul 16 '11 at 14:03

This is because your events are bound to your functions once.

When the code

$('#navigation li').not('li.active').mouseleave(function() { // Code });

executes, none of the <li>s have the active class so the event is bound to all the <li>s. You could use .live(), but a better solution would be to change your mouseleave function to look like this:

$('#navigation li').mouseleave(function() {
      if($(this).hasClass('active'))
           return false;
      $(this).stop().animate({backgroundPosition: '0px 0'}, 250);
      //$(this).children('a').animate({opacity: .1}, 25);
      $(this).children('a').css({ 'color': 'white'});
      // $(this).children('a').delay(150).animate({opacity: 1}, 175);
});

Since .live() has potential to be a bit slow if you have a lot of <li>s

share|improve this answer
    
Why is your solution better than .live()? I disagree that it is. –  Matt Ball Jul 15 '11 at 15:11
    
Thank you for this. I was able to use that type of construct to remedy another problem of mine. –  austinkir Jul 16 '11 at 1:10

Your not condition is only evaluated at the time of declaration, not when the event fires. You'd need to check within the event method.

So what you are effectively saying is

All the li elements under the dom element with the name "navigation" that do not have the class "active" assigned to them should be bound to the mouseover and mouseleave event handlers given.

So it doesn't matter what you do after that's been done, the LIs that aren't "active" when those two instructions run will always run the mouseover and mouseleave functions given. You'll need to check for the class assignment inside the functions so that it's acted upon when the event is triggered.

It's not a case of your "School" element working correctly, it's simply not bound to the event handlers.

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You never remove the active class from other elements, so they add up.

$('#navigation li').click(function() {
  $('#navigation li').removeClass("active"); // remove all initially
  $(this).addClass("active"); // add to the clicked one
});
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