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I'm working on Project Euler #27 in C++:

Euler published the remarkable quadratic formula:

n² + n + 41

It turns out that the formula will produce 40 primes for the consecutive values n = 0 to 39. However, when n = 40, 40² + 40 + 41 = 40(40 + 1) + 41 is divisible by 41, and certainly when n = 41, 41² + 41 + 41 is clearly divisible by 41.

Using computers, the incredible formula n² − 79n + 1601 was discovered, which produces 80 primes for the consecutive values n = 0 to 79. The product of the coefficients, −79 and 1601, is −126479.

Considering quadratics of the form:

n² + an + b, where |a| < 1000 and |b| < 1000

where |n| is the modulus/absolute value of n
e.g. |11| = 11 and |−4| = 4

Find the product of the coefficients, a and b, for the quadratic expression that produces the maximum number of primes for consecutive values of n, starting with n = 0.

I keep getting -60939 when the real answer is -59231. What am I missing?

#include <iostream>
#include "Helper.h"
using namespace std;

int formula(int a, int b, int n) {
    return ((n * n) + (a * n) + b);
}

int main() {
    int most = 0;
    int ansA = 0;
    int ansB = 0;
    bool end = false;

    for(int a = 999; a >= -999; a--) {
        for(int b = 999; b >= 2; b--) { //b must be prime
            if(Helper::isPrime(b)) {
                end = false;
                for(int n = 0; !end; n++) {
                    if(!Helper::isPrime(formula(a, b, n))) {
                        if(n-1 > most) {
                            most = n-1;
                            ansA = a;
                            ansB = b;
                        }
                        end = true;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
    cout << ansA << " * " << ansB << " = " << ansA * ansB << " with " << most << " primes." << endl;
    return 0;
}

In case it's the problem, here is my isPrime function:

bool Helper::isPrime(int num) {
    if(num == 2)
        return true;

    if(num % 2 == 0 || num == 1 || num == 0)
        return false;

    int root = (int) sqrt((double)num) + 1;
    for(int i = root; i >= 2; i--) {
        if (num % i == 0)
            return false;
    }
    return true;
}
share|improve this question
    
I think the n-1 part is wrong: If the answer for n==0 is prime but 1 isn't, then when you get to iteration one and drop out of the loop you'll say most = 0 when it's really one. This doesn't appear to be the source of your other problem though. –  Mark B Jul 15 '11 at 16:14
    
I copied your code and ran in C# with my IsPrime and got the right answer. So either your isPrime method is flawed or the way C++ handles formula(a, b, n) isn't what you expect. –  Austin Salonen Jul 15 '11 at 16:18
    
I added my isPrime just in case. –  paperbd Jul 15 '11 at 16:24
    
It would be faster to swap the for a and for b loops so that isPrime(b) is only called once for each b, and not 1999 times... –  adl Feb 22 '12 at 21:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You are allowing a to be negative, and your formula returns an int. Does calling Helper::isPrime with a negative number even make sense (in other words, does Helper::isPrime take an unsigned int?)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! All I needed to add to isPrime was if(num < 0) num *= -1; –  paperbd Jul 15 '11 at 16:46
    
+1 That's it, if you change the OP's isPrime to return false for negative numbers then it generates the expected answer. –  Mark B Jul 15 '11 at 16:47
2  
@paperbd: What you should have done was to reject negative numbers as prime. The first prime is 2. –  David Hammen Jul 15 '11 at 16:52
    
Right, I'll just change it so it returns false if < 1. –  paperbd Jul 15 '11 at 16:53

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