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I have an Array of Strings that was split from a buffer string. Now each item in the array has a {value, offset, count, & hash}. How can I get the offset of the item in the array?

Example:

String buffer = aVeryLongString;
String[] splitStringArray = buffer.split(regex);

for(String s: splitStringArray) {   
    // Get the offset of each item
    // Do something
}
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You might want to split again? –  Waldheinz Jul 15 '11 at 15:51
    
there must be another separator to split value, offset, count, & hash in each element, i think –  ascanio Jul 15 '11 at 15:52

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted
String buffer = aVeryLongString;
String[] splitStringArray = buffer.split(regex);

int offset = 0;
for(String s: splitStringArray) {
    offset = buffer.indexOf(s, offset);
    System.out.println(offset);
}

Using String.indexOf(String str, int offset) you can find out the offset of a string. It starts searching for the string at the given offset. So using the offset of the previous string will solve the problem with the duplicates.

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Thanks for the help! –  Ryan Goodlett Jul 15 '11 at 17:46

String.indexOf(String str) should work.

for(String s: splitStringArray) {
    System.out.println(buffer.indexOf(s));
}
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2  
Will only work if there's no duplicates , right? –  Kal Jul 15 '11 at 15:54
1  
Yeah, it'll get the first instance of it in the string. –  Jake Roussel Jul 15 '11 at 15:55
    
Thanks for the help! –  Ryan Goodlett Jul 15 '11 at 17:46

You might want to use the regex Matcher/Pattern classes instead of the String.split function. With the Matcher class you can iterate through matches with find() and get the current position via end().

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I am actually rewriting my code to not include regex. Dictated from the powers that be. ;) –  Ryan Goodlett Jul 15 '11 at 15:59
    
But String.split(regex) uses Pattern under the hood! –  pauli Jul 15 '11 at 16:02
    
I know, I know... haha –  Ryan Goodlett Jul 15 '11 at 16:57

String.split() doesn't really provide a way to recover this information (without looping through the array and adding previous lengths). If you need extra information like this about the resulting substrings, you might try java.util.Scanner.

Or, as one of the other posters suggested, use the java.util.regex classes, Pattern and Matcher.

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If the regex always matches a fixed length, then the offset would be the sum of the lengths of the preceding strings plus the length of the split string.

But if the regex length isn't fixed ... hmm, not an easy problem. You'd have to basically repeat the logic that split uses to find the pieces, I would think.

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Yes, the length of the string that the regex matches will be a variable length because it is picking up parameters that can vary. i.e. HTML / CSS Color Codes. –  Ryan Goodlett Jul 15 '11 at 16:01

Say, you want to split a buffer by whitespace characters. (\S+ stands for non-whitespace characters)

String buffer = aVeryLongString;
Pattern p = Pattern.compile("\\S+");
Matcher m = p.matcher(buffer);

while(m.find()) {
  String matchStr = m.group();
  int startOffset = m.start();
  int endOffset = m.end();
  System.out.println("[ " + matchStr + " " + Integer.toString(startOffset) + " " + Integer.toString(endOffset) + " ]");
}
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