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I'm making a stop watch where I'm using Java's SimpleDateFormat to convert the number of milliseconds into a nice "hh:mm:ss:SSS" format. The problem is the hours field always has some random number in it. Here's the code I'm using:

public static String formatTime(long millis) {
    SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("hh:mm:ss.SSS");

    String strDate = sdf.format(millis);
    return strDate;
}

If I take off the hh part then it works fine. Otherwise in the hh part it'll display something random like "07" even if the argument passed in (number of milliseconds) is zero.

I don't know much about the SimpleDateFormat class though. Thanks for any help.

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4  
From this we can deduce that you live somewhere in the middle of the US. – Ed Staub Jul 15 '11 at 16:27
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Here's how I've done it, using only the standard JDK (this will work as far back as Java 1.1 by changing StringBuilder back to StringBuffer):

static public String formatMillis(long val) {
    StringBuilder                       buf=new StringBuilder(20);
    String                              sgn="";

    if(val<0) { sgn="-"; val=Math.abs(val); }

    append(buf,sgn,0,( val/3600000             ));
    append(buf,":",2,((val%3600000)/60000      ));
    append(buf,":",2,((val         %60000)/1000));
    append(buf,".",3,( val                %1000));
    return buf.toString();
    }

/** Append a right-aligned and zero-padded numeric value to a `StringBuilder`. */
static private void append(StringBuilder tgt, String pfx, int dgt, long val) {
    tgt.append(pfx);
    if(dgt>1) {
        int pad=(dgt-1);
        for(long xa=val; xa>9 && pad>0; xa/=10) { pad--;           }
        for(int  xa=0;   xa<pad;        xa++  ) { tgt.append('0'); }
        }
    tgt.append(val);
    }
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thanks, this was the kind of solution I was looking for – JDS Jul 15 '11 at 20:09
    
using TimeUnit would be much cleaner in 2011. – Jarrod Roberson Jul 18 '11 at 15:44
    
Using JodaTime could be much cleaner in today ;) – Amir Raminfar Jul 19 '11 at 14:58
4  
This is NOT the idiomatic Java way of solving this problem. SimpleDateFormat along with TimeUnit are built in to the standard library to solve these problems without including megabytes of 3rd party libraries or writing all the math and string manipulation code yourself. If for no other reason, is that SimpleDateFormat handles time zone information transparently. – Jarrod Roberson Sep 2 '12 at 13:12
1  
@Jarrod: First, for an elapsed time Timezone is irrelevant and SimpleDateFormat is not the right class, and second if you are stuck targeting an older VM TimeUnit is not an option. – Lawrence Dol Oct 3 '12 at 2:12

Support for what you want to do is built in to the latest JDKs with a little known class called TimeUnit.

What you want to use is java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit to work with intervals.

SimpleDateFormat does just what it sounds like it does, it formats instances of java.util.Date, or in your case it converts the long value into the context of a java.util.Date and it doesn't know what to do with intervals which is what you apparently are working with.

You can easily do this without having to resort to external libraries like JodaTime.

import java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit;

public class Main
{        
    private static String formatInterval(final long l)
    {
        final long hr = TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toHours(l);
        final long min = TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toMinutes(l - TimeUnit.HOURS.toMillis(hr));
        final long sec = TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toSeconds(l - TimeUnit.HOURS.toMillis(hr) - TimeUnit.MINUTES.toMillis(min));
        final long ms = TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toMillis(l - TimeUnit.HOURS.toMillis(hr) - TimeUnit.MINUTES.toMillis(min) - TimeUnit.SECONDS.toMillis(sec));
        return String.format("%02d:%02d:%02d.%03d", hr, min, sec, ms);
    }

    public static void main(final String[] args)
    {
        System.out.println(formatInterval(Long.parseLong(args[0])));
    }
}

The output will be formatted something like this

13:00:00.000
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Note: This solution requires Java 6 or later. – Lawrence Dol Oct 9 '12 at 20:25
3  
The 'l' (ell) in this solution looks an awful lot like a one. I'd use something like mstime to represent that variable. – ingyhere Dec 16 '13 at 4:57
1  
Also, I like it, but I am not sure it's much prettier than writing: long elapsedTimeSeconds = elapsedTimeMillis / 1000; String.format("%02d:%02d:%02d.%03d", elapsedTimeSeconds / 3600, elapsedTimeSeconds % 3600) / 60, (elapsedTimeSeconds % 60), elapsedTimeMillis % 1000); – ingyhere Dec 16 '13 at 5:00

A shorter way to do this is to use the DurationFormatUtils class in Apache Commons Lang:

public static String formatTime(long millis) {
    return DurationFormatUtils.formatDuration(millis, "HH:mm:ss.S");
}
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This is the first bit of Joda work I've done where it seemed more tedious than the JDK support. A Joda implementation for the requested format (making a few assumptions about zero fields) is:

public void printDuration(long milliSecs)
{
    PeriodFormatter formatter = new PeriodFormatterBuilder()
        .printZeroIfSupported()
        .appendHours()
        .appendSeparator(":")
        .minimumPrintedDigits(2)
        .appendMinutes()
        .appendSeparator(":")
        .appendSecondsWithMillis()
        .toFormatter();

    System.out.println(formatter.print(new Period(milliSecs)));
}
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Why the downvote? – Ed Staub Sep 4 '12 at 2:09

Here is what's going on. When you pass milliseconds, that number is relative to Jan 1st, 1970. When you pass 0, it takes that date and converts it to your local time zone. If you are in Central time then that happens to be 7PM. If you run this then it all makes sense.

new SimpleDateFormat().format(0) => 12/31/69 7:00 PM

Edit, I think what you want to do is get elapsed time. For this I recommend using JodaTime which already does this pretty well. You do something like

PeriodFormatter formatter = new PeriodFormatterBuilder()
    .appendHours()
    .appendSuffix(" hour", " hours")
    .appendSeparator(" and ")
    .appendMinutes()
    .appendSuffix(" minute", " minutes")
    .appendSeparator(" and ")
    .appendSeconds()
    .appendSuffix(" second", " seconds")
    .toFormatter();

String formattedText = formatter.print(new Period(elapsedMilliSeconds));
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Daylight savings, so CDT, not EDT – Ed Staub Jul 15 '11 at 16:35
    
I agree, SimpleDateFormat is not designed to format elapsed time. Easier to write your own formatter or use the Joda formatter as you recommended. – Chris Jul 15 '11 at 17:10

The format happens according to your local timezone, so if you pass 0, it assumes 0 GMT and then converts it in your local timezone.

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Yes, this is essentially what's going. – Amir Raminfar Jul 15 '11 at 16:32

Why not this ?

public static String GetFormattedInterval(final long ms) {
    long millis = ms % 1000;
    long x = ms / 1000;
    long seconds = x % 60;
    x /= 60;
    long minutes = x % 60;
    x /= 60;
    long hours = x % 24;

    return String.format("%02d:%02d:%02d.%03d", hours, minutes, seconds, millis);
}
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Using a plain Java Calendar for intervals up to one day (24 hours) see my answer to the question: How to format time intervals in Java?

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