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I have an object person that I'm using in several methods on the front-end. How do I do that best? create new instance every time? or do public? or something else? seems pretty basic question to me.

public class Employee
    {
    public void DeleteEmployee(int employeeId)
            {
               ......
            }

    public void UpdateEmployee(int employeeId)
            {
               ......
            }

}

and then on the front-end(that's how I do it):

protected void OnDelete(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
         Employee emp = new Employee();
          emp.DeleteEmployee(empId);
       }
 protected void OnUpdate(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
         Employee emp = new Employee();
          emp.UpdateEmployee(empId);
       }
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closed as not a real question by marc_s, karim79, Jeff Atwood Jul 17 '11 at 12:16

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
You'll need to add some sample code. This question is too vague. If you create an instance of some custom object and pass it to each of your several methods, they should all be able to access it, update it, etc. –  Grant Winney Jul 15 '11 at 16:36
    
OK. Give me just a sec. –  user194076 Jul 15 '11 at 16:37
    
Please tell us what you're using this object for –  Shredder Jul 15 '11 at 16:38
    
Question updated. –  user194076 Jul 15 '11 at 16:41
    
In the sample code, where is your empId coming from? –  Jason Down Jul 15 '11 at 16:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think what you are looking for is what I would call an Employee Manager. Two popular ways to do this are to create a seperate EmployeeManager object with static methods to perform the operations, or add the static methods to the Employee object. There is some debate as to which method is the preferred one. However, the common thought process is that the Employee instance should not know anything about how it is persisted. So the results would look like either...

EmployeeManager.DeleteEmployee(empId);

or...

Employee.DeleteEmployee(empId);
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You're saying on creating new class employeeManager with the difference that it is going to have static DeleteEmployee, while employee class going to stay the way it is now? –  user194076 Jul 15 '11 at 16:52
    
No. Both will have the static method. The difference is mostly just a religious debate. I prefer to separate out the persistence methods to a different class so that they do not clutter the actual object. But that is purely my preference. –  John Kraft Jul 15 '11 at 16:56
    
I would also change the DeleteEmployee method to accept an employee object instead of an id. Just my preference (what if you decide to let people pick the employee by name and then delete them). –  Jason Down Jul 15 '11 at 17:08

Make your methods static:

public static void DeleteEmployee(int employeeId)
{
    ...
}

Call it directly on Employee:

protected void OnDelete(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Employee.DeleteEmployee(empId);
}
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And if Employee is going to be a container for employee information (such as id, name, etc.) I'd pull DeleteEmployee and UpdateEmployee out into their own separate class. –  Grant Winney Jul 15 '11 at 16:47
    
bemused, Why would you do that? Any advantage? –  user194076 Jul 15 '11 at 16:49
2  
See John Kraft's answer. If your "Employee" object stores info about an individual employee, then functions that manipulate Employees (such as deleting them) should not be defined in the same "Employee" object. Stick them in a new EmployeeManager class like John suggested. It's just a logical separation. If you have an object called Car, which contains make, model, color, etc., it makes sense to have a separate class with methods like RepairCar(Car myCar) and PaintCar(Car myCar, Color color). These methods would not belong in the Car object itself. –  Grant Winney Jul 15 '11 at 16:51

Typically I would say the Employee should not be responsible for creating/updating/deleting itself. The Data context (or Repository, or whatever) should have that responsibility.

So you'd have something like (off-the-cuff, double check spelling/syntax)

EmployeeRepository //Normally Inherits a BaseRepository and/or implements an IRepository<T>
{
    public void Create([some parameters here]) {...}
    public void Delete(Employee employee) {...}
    public Employee Find(Expression<Func<Employee, bool>> predicate) {...}
    //other methods...
}

And your code would call

static void Main()
{
    EmployeeRepository Employees = new EmployeeRepository();

    Employee bob = Employees.Create("Bob");

    Employee fired = Employees.Find(e => e.Id == whatever);
    Employees.Delete(fired);
}
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