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I am trying to create a second thread with dispatcher so that I can have the primary dispatcher (for the UI) completely stress-free, and have the UI constantly respondant.

Now, I could create multiple threads for each sub (or void in C#), but isn't it possible for me to create one new thread and grab it's dispatcher, and invoke to that? This is what I've done:

Private CheckLoopThread As New System.Threading.Thread(New System.Threading.ThreadStart(AddressOf CheckLoop))

CheckLoopThread.Priority = System.Threading.ThreadPriority.Lowest
CheckLoopThread.Start()
Dim Test As Windows.Threading.Dispatcher = Windows.Threading.Dispatcher.FromThread(CheckLoopThread)

However, the variable "Test" is after execution "Nothing". How is this possible? Is the another way to create a second dispatcher?

Answers are appreciated in any .NET form. Visual Basic or C#. I am working in VB.NET WPF on the .NET 4.0 framework.

Thanks in advance.

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Make sure that CheckLoopThread doesn't end instantly after starting it (if the thread runs a CheckLoop procedure that doesn't take long to execute). –  Mathias Lykkegaard Lorenzen Jul 15 '11 at 18:16
    
The check loop has a loop in it, which doesn't end. –  René Sackers Jul 16 '11 at 6:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Dispatcher.FromThread will not create a Dispatcher and will return null, if a Dispatcher has not already been created for the thread. To create a Dispatcher for a thread, you will have to access Dispatcher.CurrentDispatcher at least once on your CheckLoopThread. As it says on MSDN for Dispatcher.CurrentDispatcher:

If a Dispatcher is not associated with the current thread, a new Dispatcher will be created. This is not the case with the FromThread method. FromThread will return null if there is not a dispatcher associated with the specified thread

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Thank you so much! That indeed was it. +1 For you. –  René Sackers Jul 18 '11 at 1:25

Why locking?

I prefer:

        Dispatcher dispatcher = null;

        ManualResetEvent dispatcherReadyEvent = new ManualResetEvent(false);

        new Thread(new ThreadStart(() =>
        {
            dispatcher = Dispatcher.CurrentDispatcher;
            dispatcherReadyEvent.Set();
            Dispatcher.Run();
        })).Start();

        dispatcherReadyEvent.WaitOne();

        dispatcher.Invoke(...);
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1  
Very true, although I'm not sure if the underlying implementation is the same. –  mycroes Aug 5 '13 at 11:25

I'm actually creating a lot of these dispatchers, I guess the proper way is something along the following lines:

object theLock = new object();
Dispatcher dispatcher = null;

lock (theLock)
{
    new Thread(new ThreadStart(() =>
    {
        lock (theLock)
        {
            dispatcher = Dispatcher.CurrentDispatcher;
            Monitor.Pulse(theLock);
        }
        Dispatcher.Run();
    })).Start();

    Monitor.Wait(theLock);
}

dispatcher.Invoke(...);

It seems complicated with all the locking, but theoretically the Start() method can return before dispatcher is actually set, so a call to to it might result in a NullReferenceException without the locks.

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