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If I need to perform a complex calculation based on row data, and then alias it, in a query that might only need to operate on 10 of 10000 rows because of restrictive where clauses, is it best to use a subquery in the FROM clause, instead of using a single query?

An example is probably easier:

SELECT *,COMPLEX_CALC(t1.c10) AS a1 
FROM t1 
WHERE c2 > 5 AND c3 < 10 AND C6 = 4 AND c7 > 50
HAVING a1 > 100
LIMIT 1000;

Or

SELECT *,COMPLEX_CALC(ta1.c10) AS a1
FROM
    (SELECT * FROM t1
     WHERE c2 > 5 AND c3 < 10 AND C6 = 4 AND c7 > 50
     LIMIT 1000) as ta1
HAVING a1 > 100;

Which query would be faster? I guess the real question is - will MySQL apply the WHERE clauses before performing the COMPLEX_CALC on all rows?

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4  
Which runs faster when you try them? Have you tried profiling the queries at all? –  AllenG Jul 15 '11 at 17:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I guess the real question is - will MySQL apply the WHERE clauses before performing the COMPLEX_CALC on all rows?

Yes

But if you look closely at your queries then first one runs COMPLEX_CALC on all rows satisfying where clause and then taking 1000 of them

on the secon one it takes 1000 rows, run COMPLEX_CALC on it and take only those having a1 > 100 which is probably less than 1000 rows

The botton line is that your queries are not identical in output.

in any case the COMPLEX_CALC is run actually twice: once for every row in having clause and then second time (upto 1000 times beacause of the limit) in select part.

I suggest:

SELECT * 
  FROM (SELECT *,COMPLEX_CALC(t1.c10) AS a1 
          FROM t1 
         WHERE c2 > 5 AND c3 < 10 AND C6 = 4 AND c7 > 50) subtbl
 WHERE a1 > 100
 LIMIT 1000;

And its your call if you need the limit here or in subquery

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2  
The rows that the select sees are not determined until the WHERE clause is resolved. –  Dereleased Jul 15 '11 at 17:06
    
Many thanks - I would not have remembered the double calculation had you not mentioned it. –  rin-tin-tin Jul 15 '11 at 18:35

From High Performance MySQL 2nd Edition:

The most important advice we can give on subqueries is that you should usually pre- fer a join where possible, at least in current versions of MySQL. We covered this topic extensively earlier in this chapter.

If you put 'EXPLAIN' before your query, mysql will show you what steps it will run to execute this query and with the reslt you should be able to see what's going to run faster.

Can you execute those 2 queries with 'EXPLAIN' and get back with the output?

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Thanks. It was more hypothetical after a conversation at work regarding a project; so there's no real data yet. –  rin-tin-tin Jul 15 '11 at 18:36

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