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What exactly is RESTful programming?

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4  
This video has a non-stupid introduction –  bobobobo Jan 16 at 22:18
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18 Answers 18

up vote 1149 down vote accepted

REST is the underlying architectural principle of the web. The amazing thing about the web is the fact that clients (browsers) and servers can interact in complex ways without the client knowing anything beforehand about the server and the resources it hosts. The key constraint is that the server and client must both agree on the media used, which in the case of the web is HTML.

An API that adheres to the principles of REST does not require the client to know anything about the structure of the API. Rather, the server needs to provide whatever information the client needs to interact with the service. An HTML form is an example of this: The server specifies the location of the resource, and the required fields. The browser doesn't know in advance where to submit the information, and it doesn't know in advance what information to submit. Both forms of information are entirely supplied by the server. (This principle is called HATEOAS.)

So, how does this apply to HTTP, and how can it be implemented in practice? HTTP is oriented around verbs and resources. The two verbs in mainstream usage are GET and POST, which I think everyone will recognize. However, the HTTP standard defines several others such as PUT and DELETE. These verbs are then applied to resources, according to the instructions provided by the server.

For example, Let's imagine that we have a user database that is managed by a web service. Our service uses a custom hypermedia based on JSON, for which we assign the mimetype application/json+userdb (There might also be an application/xml+userdb and application/whatever+userdb - many media types may be supported). The client and the server has both been programmed to understand this format, but they don't know anything about each other. As Roy Fielding points out:

A REST API should spend almost all of its descriptive effort in defining the media type(s) used for representing resources and driving application state, or in defining extended relation names and/or hypertext-enabled mark-up for existing standard media types.

A request for the base resource / might return something like this:

Request

GET /
Accept: application/json+userdb

Response

200 OK
Content-Type: application/json+userdb

{
    "version": "1.0",
    "links": [
        {
            "href": "/user",
            "rel": "list",
            "method": "GET"
        },
        {
            "href": "/user",
            "rel": "create",
            "method": "POST"
        }
    ]
}

We know from the description of our media that we can find information about related resources from sections called "links". This is called Hypermedia controls. In this case, we can tell from such a section that we can find a user list by making another request for /user:

Request

GET /user
Accept: application/json+userdb

Response

200 OK
Content-Type: application/json+userdb

{
    "users": [
        {
            "id": 1,
            "name": "Emil",
            "country: "Sweden",
            "links": [
                {
                    "href": "/user/1",
                    "rel": "self",
                    "method": "GET"
                },
                {
                    "href": "/user/1",
                    "rel": "edit",
                    "method": "PUT"
                },
                {
                    "href": "/user/1",
                    "rel": "delete",
                    "method": "DELETE"
                }
            ]
        },
        {
            "id": 2,
            "name": "Adam",
            "country: "Scotland",
            "links": [
                {
                    "href": "/user/2",
                    "rel": "self",
                    "method": "GET"
                },
                {
                    "href": "/user/2",
                    "rel": "edit",
                    "method": "PUT"
                },
                {
                    "href": "/user/2",
                    "rel": "delete",
                    "method": "DELETE"
                }
            ]
        }
    ],
    "links": [
        {
            "href": "/user",
            "rel": "create",
            "method": "POST"
        }
    ]
}

We can tell a lot from this response. For instance, we now know we can create a new user by POSTing to /user:

Request

POST /user
Accept: application/json+userdb
Content-Type: application/json+userdb

{
    "name": "Karl",
    "country": "Austria"
}

Response

201 Created
Content-Type: application/json+userdb

{
    "user": {
        "id": 3,
        "name": "Karl",
        "country": "Austria",
        "links": [
            {
                "href": "/user/3",
                "rel": "self",
                "method": "GET"
            },
            {
                "href": "/user/3",
                "rel": "edit",
                "method": "PUT"
            },
            {
                "href": "/user/3",
                "rel": "delete",
                "method": "DELETE"
            }
        ]
    },
    "links": {
       "href": "/user",
       "rel": "list",
       "method": "GET"
    }
}

We also know that we can change existing data:

Request

PUT /user/1
Accept: application/json+userdb
Content-Type: application/json+userdb

{
    "name": "Emil",
    "country": "Bhutan"
}

Response

200 OK
Content-Type: application/json+userdb

{
    "user": {
        "id": 1,
        "name": "Emil",
        "country": "Bhutan",
        "links": [
            {
                "href": "/user/1",
                "rel": "self",
                "method": "GET"
            },
            {
                "href": "/user/1",
                "rel": "edit",
                "method": "PUT"
            },
            {
                "href": "/user/1",
                "rel": "delete",
                "method": "DELETE"
            }
        ]
    },
    "links": {
       "href": "/user",
       "rel": "list",
       "method": "GET"
    }
}

Notice that we are using different HTTP verbs (GET, PUT, POST, DELETE etc.) to manipulate these resources, and that the only knowledge we presume on the clients part is our media definition.

Further reading:

(This answer has been subject of a fair amount of criticism for missing the point. For the most part, that has been a fair critique. What I originally described was more in line with how REST was usually implemented a few years ago when I first wrote this, rather than its true meaning. I've revised the answer to better represent the real meaning.)

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87  
So to sum up: RESTful is another buzz-word that popped out of the Web 2.0 erection - something that's already there but someone wanted to give a name? :) –  cwap Mar 22 '09 at 15:07
82  
No. REST didn't just pop up as another buzzword. It came about as a means of describing an alternative to SOAP-based data exchange. The term REST helps frame the discussion about how to transfer and access data. –  tvanfosson Mar 22 '09 at 15:11
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Nonetheless, the heart of REST (in practical application) is "don't use GET to make changes, use POST/PUT/DELETE", which is advice I've been hearing (and following) since long before SOAP appeared. REST has always been there, it just didn't get a name beyond "the way to do it" until recently. –  Dave Sherohman Mar 22 '09 at 15:16
17  
Don't forget "Hypertext as the engine of application state". –  Hank Gay Mar 22 '09 at 15:54
22  
This answer misses the point. HTTP is barely mentioned in Fielding's thesis. –  user359996 Nov 18 '10 at 2:22
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IMHO (and I tend to be in the minority), RESTful programming is about:

  • resources being identified by a persistent identifier: URIs are the ubiquitous choice of identifier these days
  • resources being manipulated using a common set of verbs: HTTP methods are the commonly seen case - the venerable Create, Retrieve, Update, Delete becomes POST, GET, PUT, and DELETE
  • the actual representation retrieved for a resource is dependent on the request and not the identifier: use HTTP Accept headers to control whether you want XML, HTTP, or even a Java Object representing the resource
  • maintaining the state in the object and representing the state in the representation
  • representing the relationships between resources in the representation of the resource: the links between objects are embedded directly in the representation
  • resource representations describe how the representation can be used and under what circumstances it should be discarded/refetched in a consistent manner: usage of HTTP Cache-Control headers

The last one is probably the most important in terms of consequences and overall effectiveness of REST. Overall, most of the RESTful discussions seem to center on HTTP and its usage from a browser and what not. I understand that R. Fielding coined the term when he described the architecture and decisions that lead to HTTP. His thesis is more about the architecture and cache-ability of resources than it is about HTTP.

If you are really interested in what a RESTful architecture is and why it works, read his thesis a few times and read the whole thing not just Chapter 5! Next look into why DNS works. Read about the hierarchical organization of DNS and how referrals work. Then read and consider how DNS caching works. Finally, read the HTTP specifications (RFC2616 and RFC3040 in particular) and consider how and why the caching works the way that it does. Eventually, it will just click. The final revelation for me was when I saw the similarity between DNS and HTTP. After this, understanding why SOA and Message Passing Interfaces are scalable starts to click.

I think that the most important trick to understanding the architectural importance and performance implications of a RESTful and Shared Nothing architectures is to avoid getting hung up on the technology and implementation details. Concentrate on who owns resources, who is responsible for creating/maintaining them, etc. Then think about the representations, protocols, and technologies.

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An answer providing a reading list is very appropriate for this question. –  ellisbben Feb 1 '12 at 19:50
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You need to switch PUT and POST. –  Sindre Sorhus Feb 1 '12 at 22:13
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@SindreSorhus: Not any more :) –  Magnus Hoff Feb 1 '12 at 23:09
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Thanks for the update. PUT and POST don't really map one-to-one with update and create. PUT can be used to create if the client is dictating what the URI will be. POST creates if the server is assigning the new URI. –  D.Shawley Feb 1 '12 at 23:30
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Don't forget PATCH. –  epitka Sep 16 '13 at 15:20
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This is what it might look like:

POST /user
fname=John&lname=Doe&age=25

The server responds:

200 OK
Location: /user/123

In the future, you can then retrieve the user information:

GET /user/123

The server responds:

200 OK
<fname>John</fname><lname>Doe</lname><age>25</age>

To update:

PUT /user/123
fname=Johnny
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For me this answer captured the essence of the desired answer. Simple and pragmatic. Granted there are lots of other criteria, but the example provided is a great launch pad. –  CyberFonic Feb 1 '12 at 22:09
    
Agree with @CyberED. Wish all questions has one of these answers. Short and easy. –  S Rahul Bose Jan 28 '13 at 10:58
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In the last example, @pbreitenbach uses PUT fname=Jonny. This would set lname and age to default values (probably NULL or the empty string, and integer 0), because a PUT overwrites the whole resource with data from the representation provided. This is not what is implied by "update", to do a real update, use the PATCH method as this does not alter fields which are not specified in the representation. –  Nicholas Jan 31 '13 at 9:43
10  
Nicholas is right. Also, the URI for the first POST creating a user should be called users because /user/1 makes no sense and there should be a listing at /users. The response should be a 201 Created and not just OK in that case. –  DanMan Feb 16 '13 at 19:58
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A great book on REST is REST in Practice.

Must reads are Representational State Transfer (REST) and REST APIs must be hypertext-driven

See Martin Fowlers article the Richardson Maturity Model (RMM) for an explanation on what an RESTful service is.

Richardson Maturity Model

To be RESTful a Service needs to fulfill the Hypermedia as the Engine of Application State. (HATEOAS), that is, it needs to reach level 3 in the RMM, read the article for details or the slides from the qcon talk.

The HATEOAS constraint is an acronym for Hypermedia as the Engine of Application State. This principle is the key differentiator between a REST and most other forms of client server system.

...

A client of a RESTful application need only know a single fixed URL to access it. All future actions should be discoverable dynamically from hypermedia links included in the representations of the resources that are returned from that URL. Standardized media types are also expected to be understood by any client that might use a RESTful API. (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

REST Litmus Test for Web Frameworks is a similar maturity test for web frameworks.

Approaching pure REST: Learning to love HATEOAS is a good collection of links.

REST versus SOAP for the Public Cloud discusses the current levels of REST usage.

REST and versioning discusses Extensibility, Versioning, Evolvability, etc. through Modifiability

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Awesome reading list! Thanks! –  minghua Jul 3 at 16:30
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It's programming where the architecture of your system fits the REST style laid out by Roy Fielding in his thesis. Since this is the architectural style that describes the web (more or less), lots of people are interested in it.

Bonus answer: No. Unless you're studying software architecture as an academic or designing web services, there's really no reason to have heard the term.

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1  
but not straight-forward .. makes it more complicated that it needs to be. –  hasenj Mar 22 '09 at 15:38
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It's a Ph.D. thesis. By it's nature, it will tend to favor exactness and completeness over accessibility to people who aren't approaching a Ph.D. within that specific field. To be honest, I'm shocked it isn't more esoteric. –  Hank Gay Mar 22 '09 at 15:46
3  
Also, even though the terms REST and RESTful are used almost exclusively in the realm of web applications right now, technically there's nothing tying REST to HTTP. –  Hank Gay Mar 22 '09 at 15:52
3  
Fielding's blog has some good, easier to comprehend articles on REST and common misconceptions: roy.gbiv.com/untangled/2008/rest-apis-must-be-hypertext-driven –  aehlke Jul 20 '09 at 17:32
1  
@HankGay I think the reason it's not more esoteric is that most web service developers see REST as a wonderful simplification over alternatives like SOAP. They don't necessarily stick to getting all the REST technicalities correct - and that probably drives the REST fanatics mad - but in most cases they probably don't need to worry about things like making sure their results are "hypermedia-enabled". –  moodboom Jul 4 '13 at 11:56
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What is REST?

REST stands for Representational State Transfer. (It is sometimes spelled "ReST".) It relies on a stateless, client-server, cacheable communications protocol -- and in virtually all cases, the HTTP protocol is used.

REST is an architecture style for designing networked applications. The idea is that, rather than using complex mechanisms such as CORBA, RPC or SOAP to connect between machines, simple HTTP is used to make calls between machines.

In many ways, the World Wide Web itself, based on HTTP, can be viewed as a REST-based architecture. RESTful applications use HTTP requests to post data (create and/or update), read data (e.g., make queries), and delete data. Thus, REST uses HTTP for all four CRUD (Create/Read/Update/Delete) operations.

REST is a lightweight alternative to mechanisms like RPC (Remote Procedure Calls) and Web Services (SOAP, WSDL, et al.). Later, we will see how much more simple REST is.

Despite being simple, REST is fully-featured; there's basically nothing you can do in Web Services that can't be done with a RESTful architecture. REST is not a "standard". There will never be a W3C recommendataion for REST, for example. And while there are REST programming frameworks, working with REST is so simple that you can often "roll your own" with standard library features in languages like Perl, Java, or C#.

One of the best reference I found when I try to find the simple real meaning of rest.

http://rest.elkstein.org/

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REST is using the various HTTP methods (mainly GET/PUT/DELETE) to manipulate data.

Rather than using a specific URL to delete a method (say, /user/123/delete), you would send a DELETE request to the /user/[id] URL, to edit a user, to retrieve info on a user you send a GET request to /user/[id]

For example, instead a set of URLs which might look like some of the following..

GET /delete_user.x?id=123
GET /user/delete
GET /new_user.x
GET /user/new
GET /user?id=1
GET /user/id/1

You use the HTTP "verbs" and have..

GET /user/2
DELETE /user/2
PUT /user
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7  
That's "using HTTP properly", which is not the same as "restful" (although it's related to it) –  Julian Reschke Mar 22 '09 at 15:56
1  
You could also use /user/del/2 and /user/remove/2 or... GET/DELETE/PUT/POST are just the standardised, "proper" way to do such things (and as Julian says, that's not all there is to REST) –  dbr Jun 2 '09 at 21:32
    
Standardized things, that are not present in many places. –  Vadim Ferderer Jun 3 '09 at 13:21
    
Sure, but that's no reason to avoid them.. REST just saves you reinventing the wheel each time. For an API, REST is great (consistency!), but for structuring a random website it doesn't really matter I'd say (it can be more hassle than it's worth) –  dbr Jun 3 '09 at 22:34
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Vadim, that would be simply RPC. It's also dangerous to use GET for modifying data since (among other reasons) a search engine may spider your deletion links and visit them all. –  aehlke Jul 20 '09 at 17:35
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I apologize if I'm not answering the question directly (I'm new to SO and don't have pts to comment), but it's easier to understand all this with more detailed examples. Fielding is not easy to understand due to all the abstraction and terminology.

There's a fairly good example here:

Explaining REST and Hypertext: Spam-E the Spam Cleaning Robot

And even better, there's a clean explanation with simple examples here (the powerpoint is more comprehensive, but you can get most of it in the html version):

http://www.xfront.com/REST.ppt or http://www.xfront.com/REST.html

After reading the examples, I could see why Ken is saying that REST is hypertext-driven. I'm not actually sure that he's right though, because that /user/123 is a URI that points to a resource, and it's not clear to me that it's unRESTful just because the client knows about it "out-of-band."

That xfront document explains the difference between REST and SOAP, and this is really helpful too. When Fielding says, "That is RPC. It screams RPC.", it's clear that RPC is not RESTful, so it's useful to see the exact reasons for this. (SOAP is a type of RPC.)

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6  
cool links, thanks. I'm tired of these REST guys that say some example is not "REST-ful", but then refuse to say how to change the example to be REST-ful. –  coder_tim Feb 1 '12 at 19:19
    
@tompark, thanks for the PPT. The explanation was crystal clear, and beginner-friendly. –  Srikanth Mar 24 at 17:36
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I see a bunch of answers that say putting everything about user 123 at resource "/user/123" is RESTful.

Roy Fielding, who coined the term, says REST APIs must be hypertext-driven. In particular, "A REST API must not define fixed resource names or hierarchies".

So if your "/user/123" path is hardcoded on the client, it's not really RESTful. A good use of HTTP, maybe, maybe not. But not RESTful. It has to come from hypertext.

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so .... how would that example be restful? how would you change the url to make it restful? –  hasenj Mar 22 '09 at 16:49
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hasen: Using one resource for all operations might be necessary for RESTfulness, but isn't sufficient. –  Ken Mar 22 '09 at 17:20
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ok well .. could you explain further? What's the point of saying "no these guys are wrong .. I know what's right" without saying what you know (or think) to be right? –  hasenj Mar 22 '09 at 20:55
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I gave the link to Fielding's description. I thought I said exactly the relevant diff to the other responses: needs to be driven by hypertext. If "/user/123" comes from some out-of-band API documentation, then it's not RESTful. If it comes from a resource identifier in your hypertext, then it is. –  Ken Mar 23 '09 at 2:08
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What happens is: you PUT new user information to /user, the server processes your PUT and send you back a location for the new resource /user/123. Then in the future, you can retrieve the user information with GET /user/123 –  pbreitenbach Jul 4 '09 at 5:43
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If I had to reduce the original dissertation on REST to just 3 short sentences, I think the following captures its essence:

  1. Resources are requested via URLs.
  2. Protocols are limited to what you can communicate by using URLs.
  3. Metadata is passed as name-value pairs (post data and query string parameters).

After that, it's easy to fall into debates about adaptations, coding conventions, and best practices.

Interestingly, there is no mention of HTTP POST, GET, DELETE, or PUT operations in the dissertation. That must be someone's later interpretation of a "best practice" for a "uniform interface".

When it comes to web services, it seems that we need some way of distinguishing WSDL and SOAP based architectures which add considerable overhead and arguably much unnecessary complexity to the interface. They also require additional frameworks and developer tools in order to implement. I'm not sure if REST is the best term to distinguish between common-sense interfaces and overly engineered interfaces such as WSDL and SOAP. But we need something.

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What is REST?

REST in official words, REST is an architectural style built on certain principles using the current “Web” fundamentals. There are 5 basic fundamentals of web which are leveraged to create REST services.

Principle 1: Everything is a Resource In the REST architectural style, data and functionality are considered resources and are accessed using Uniform Resource Identifiers (URIs), typically links on the Web.

Principle 2: Every Resource is Identified by a Unique Identifier(URI)

Principle 3: Use Simple and Uniform Interfaces

Principle 4: Communication is Done by Representation

Principle 5: Be Stateless

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REST is an architectural pattern and style of writing distributed applications. It is not a programming style in the narrow sense.

Saying you use the REST style is similar to saying that you built a house in a particular style: for example Tudor or Victorian. Both REST as an software style and Tudor or Victorian as a home style can be defined by the qualities and constraints that make them up. For example REST must have Client Server separation where messages are self-describing. Tudor style homes have Overlapping gables and Roofs that are steeply pitched with front facing gables. You can read Roy's dissertation to learn more about the constraints and qualities that make up REST.

REST unlike home styles has had a tough time being consistently and practically applied. This may have been intentional. Leaving its actual implementation up to the designer. So you are free to do what you want so as long as you meet the constraints set out in the dissertation you are creating REST Systems.

Bonus:

The entire web is based on REST (or REST was based on the web). Therefore as a web developer you might want aware of that although it's not necessary to write good web apps.

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The answer is very simple, there is a dissertation written by Roy Fielding. In that dissertation he describes the REST principles. If an application fulfills all of those principles, then that is a RESTful application. So RESTful programming is programming RESTful webservices and clients for those services.

REST is very similar to how the web works. You GET a root url, usually google.com, after that you got a hypermedia in your browser, which describes a form. You fill out and send the form and you browse the search results. You choose the link your intend to see, you click on that link, and you GET another hypermedia in your browser again, usually a webpage. And so on... REST principles say, that if you want to have a webapplication, you should program it the same way as the web works.

For example if you have a webapplication with ajax, you usually do something like this in your request:

POST http://mywebshot/cart/add-item
content-type: application/json
{
    id: 123,
    amount: 2
}

status: 200 ok
content-type: application/json
true

This is not how the web works. By the web, the client is your browser, and the server is the http server you are communicating with. You send requests to the http server to the url previously given in a link or in a form action. After that the server processes your request, parses the data you sent, executes database commands, etc... and returns a response. The response is usually in a hypermedia format: HTML, RSS, etc... and contains further links, and forms. By a webapplication with ajax, the client is your javascript application running in your browser, and the server is the application running in the server, and they communicate with eachother. By the example above your client knows because of hardcoding: which url http://mywebshot/cart/add-item send the data to, and it also knows that the true value means that the items are added to the cart. By browsing the web, the url-s are not hardcoded in your browser, and the information about success, travels through the http status header. So by a RESTful webservice, your client first GETs the root of your REST API. This is the only url what is hardcoded to the client. After that it receives a link to the catalog, and it displays the link, or it automatically GET the catalog. After that it will receive a collection of items with many links from the REST service. It displays the collection for you, you choose product, for example product id:123. After that the client GETs the product details from the REST service and it displays it in the browser. The details will contain a form about how to add items to your current cart, for example something like this:

GET http://api.mywebshop.com/v1/items/123?fields="id,name"&cart.id=1

status: 200 ok
content-type: application/hal+json
{
    id: 123,
    name: "cat food 8000",
    _links: {
        self: {
            href: "http://api.mywebshop.com/v1/items/123"
        },
        up: {
            title: "catalog",
            href: "http://api.mywebshop.com/v1/items"
        },
        addCart: {
            title: "add to cart",
            href: "http://api.mywebshop.com/v1/cart-items",
            fields: {
                "cart.id": {
                    type: "hidden",
                    value: 1
                },
                "item.id": {
                    type: "hidden",
                    value: 123
                },
                amount: {
                    type: "select",
                    options: {min: 1, max: 5},
                    defaultOption: 1
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

Your REST client processes this data and displays this as a select input with amounts and an add to cart button. If you click on that button, your client will send a POST request to http://api.mywebshop.com/v1/cart-items, and add a new cart - item relationship with the amount you chose, for example 2. The request/response will be something like this:

POST http://api.mywebshop.com/v1/cart-items
content-type: application/json
{
    cart: {
        id: 1
    },
    item: {
        id: 123
    },
    amount: 2
}

status: 200 ok
content-type: application/hal+json
{
    _links: {
        self: {
            href: "http://api.mywebshop.com/v1/cart-items/456"
        }
    }
}

If you have success, you will get 200 ok http status, and the self link above. After that, your client can GET that self link:

GET http://api.mywebshop.com/v1/cart-items/456

status: 200 ok
content-type: application/hal+json
{
    id: 456,
    amount: 2,
    _embedded: {
        cart: {
            _links: {
                self: {
                    href: "http://api.mywebshop.com/v1/carts/1"
                }
            }
        },
        item: {
            _links: {
                self: {
                    href: "http://api.mywebshop.com/v1/items/123"
                }
            }
        }
    },
    _links: {
        self: {
            href: "http://api.mywebshop.com/v1/cart-items/456"
        },
        edit: {
            title: "change amount",
            href: "http://api.mywebshop.com/v1/cart-items/456",
            fields: {
                amount: {
                    type: "select",
                    options: {min: 1, max: 5},
                    defaultOption: 2
                }
            }
        },
        destroy: {
            title: "remove from cart",
            href: "http://api.mywebshop.com/v1/cart-items/456"
        }
    }
}

So by GETting that self-link your client will receive another links and forms, and so on...

To summarize this:

Your REST client is very similar to a browser, because it browses the content and interact through the links and forms contained by the content. The REST service provides the content in a hypermedia format (by webpages this is HTML, by REST services this is HAL+JSON, JSON-LD, etc.. something easy to parse). The REST client does not build url, links or forms, it always receives that data from the REST service. The REST client can temporarily store the links and forms it receives from the REST service. So this is how RESTful programming works.

The real question is, why is this good?

  • You can publish your REST service only to your customers, you don't have to create a complete webpage... For example if you are a distributor, you can create a REST service, and your resellers will use that REST service to automatically order products, automatically update their prices in their webshops, etc... So by RESTful programming, you can have multiple different clients using the same REST API. You can create a public API, and anybody can write a client using your API, for example facebook does the same...
  • If your modify your REST API, for example the urls in it, or logic of ordering and price counting, you can do it without consequences, because the already existing clients won't break, because they use the links they get from the REST service, instead of building the links on their own. So there is a loose coupling between the clients and the service. By a webpage, you can have multiple clients, for example html only client, mobile client, ajax client, etc... they won't break by adding a new feature...
  • If you use recommended data modeling formats in your http messages, for example microformats2 or existing microdata schemas, then you can create a general client, which you can use in any webservice (which supports the chosen modeling format and media type ofc). So because of the loose coupling between the client and the service, and some data modeling constraints, you can create multiple services to the same client. Currently nobody does this, but it is possible in theory, because the browsers does the same...

So if you want to create a webapplication then REST is a very good choice. Sadly there are not so many RESTful frameworks out there. Usually they only fulfill the one uri one resource and the nouns in url, verbs in http method principles (ofc they have other names in the dissertation). It is hard to fulfill the hypermedia constraint (it means that your REST client should not build links and forms on its own, it should just use those it received from the REST service). The only PHP lib I know of and which is truly RESTful is Hydra, but it is an alpha or a beta currently... I know nothing about frameworks in other programming languages, maybe there is one RESTful framework in your favourite language too...

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I would say RESTful programing would be about creating systems (API) that follow the REST architectural style.

I found this fantastic, short, and easy to understand tutorial about REST by Dr. M. Elkstein and quoting the essential part that would answer your question for the most part:

Learn REST: A Tutorial

REST is an architecture style for designing networked applications. The idea is that, rather than using complex mechanisms such as CORBA, RPC or SOAP to connect between machines, simple HTTP is used to make calls between machines.

  • In many ways, the World Wide Web itself, based on HTTP, can be viewed as a REST-based architecture.

RESTful applications use HTTP requests to post data (create and/or update), read data (e.g., make queries), and delete data. Thus, REST uses HTTP for all four CRUD (Create/Read/Update/Delete) operations.

I don't think you should feel stupid for not hearing about REST outside stackoverflow..., I would be in the same situation!; answers to this other SO question on Why is REST getting big now could could ease some feelings.

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Just now I realized the tutorial is already referenced in Ravi's answer. Opss. –  Only You Jul 12 '13 at 17:47
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The point of rest is that if we agree to use a common language for basic operations (the http verbs), the infrastructure can be configured to understand them and optimize them properly, for example, by making use of caching headers to implement caching at all levels.

With a properly implemented restful GET operation, it shouldn't matter if the information comes from your server's DB, your server's memcache, a CDN, a proxy's cache, your browser's cache or your browser's local storage. The fasted, most readily available up to date source can be used.

Saying that Rest is just a syntactic change from using GET requests with an action parameter to using the available http verbs makes it look like it has no benefits and is purely cosmetic. The point is to use a language that can be understood and optimized by every part of the chain. If your GET operation has an action with side effects, you have to skip all HTTP caching or you'll end up with inconsistent results.

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"Saying that Rest is just a syntactic change... makes it look like it has no benefits and is purely cosmetic" --- that's exactly why I am reading answers here on SO. Note that you did not explain, why REST is not purely cosmetic. –  Sergey Orshanskiy Oct 8 '13 at 17:14
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RESTful (Representational state transfer) API programming is writing web applications in any programming language by following 5 basic software architectural style principles:

  1. Resource (data, information).
  2. Unique global identifier (all resources are unique identified by URI).
  3. Uniform interface - use simple and standard interface (HTTP).
  4. Representation - all communication is done by representation (e.g. XML/JSON)
  5. Stateless (every request happens in complete isolation, it's easier to cache and load-balance),

In other words you're writing simple point-to-point network applications over HTTP which uses verbs such as GET, POST, PUT or DELETE by implementing RESTful architecture which proposes standardization of the interface each “resource” exposes. It is nothing that using current features of the web in a simple and effective way (highly successful, proven and distributed architecture). It is an alternative to more complex mechanisms like SOAP, CORBA and RPC.

RESTful programming conforms to Web architecture design and, if properly implemented, it allows you to take the full advantage of scalable Web infrastructure.

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I think the point of restful is the separation of the statefulness into a higher layer while making use of the internet (protocol) as a stateless transport layer. Most other approaches mix things up.

It's been the best practical approach to handle the fundamental changes of programming in internet era. Regarding the fundamental changes, Erik Meijer has a discussion on show here: http://www.infoq.com/interviews/erik-meijer-programming-language-design-effects-purity#view_93197 . He summarizes it as the five effects, and presents a solution by designing the solution into a programming language. The solution, could also be achieved in the platform or system level, regardless of the language. The restful could be seen as one of the solutions that has been very successful in the current practice.

With restful style, you get and manipulate the state of the application across an unreliable internet. If it fails the current operation to get the correct and current state, it needs the zero-validation principal to help the application to continue. If it fails to manipulate the state, it usually uses multiple stages of confirmation to keep things correct. In this sense, rest is not itself a whole solution, it needs the functions in other part of the web application stack to support its working.

Given this view point, the rest style is not really tied to internet or web application. It's a fundamental solution to many of the programming situations. It is not simple either, it just makes the interface really simple, and copes with other technologies amazingly well.

Just my 2c.

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REST is a distributed systems (such as WWW) software architecture style, you can imagine that it is a well-designed Web application rules: a group of Internet Web pages (a virtual state machine), in which hyperlink by clicking link (state transition), the result is the next Web page (which means the next state of the application).

REST describes the network system consists of three parts:

  1. data elements (resource, resource identifier, representation)
  2. connectors (client, server, cache, resolver, tunnel)
  3. components (origin server, gateway, proxy, user agent)

REST strictly meet the following conditions:

  1. Status of the application functionality is split into resources
  2. Each resource used as hyperlinks positioning syntax (ie, in the WWW URI)
  3. All resources share a uniform interface between the client with the resource transition state, including:
    1. A limited set of well-defined operations (ie in HTTP GET / POST / PUT / DELETE)
    2. A limited set of content format content types, which may include executable code (ie, in the WWW Javascript)
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The question was to explain without buzz-words, and here we have "data elements", "connectors", "components", "positioning syntax", "operations". Besides, you start by saying that REST is a design style. Then you say that REST is not a style but a group of pages in which the result of clicking a link is another web page (what else can it be?) After that, it turns out, REST is not a group of pages but a description of some network system, and this description has to "meet some conditions". And I still cannot wrap my brain around "Status of the application functionality is split into resources" –  Sergey Orshanskiy Oct 8 '13 at 17:12
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3 downvotes? @SergeyOrshanskiy I don't even understand how this answer is wrong. Apart from some small grammatical mistakes ("The REST architectural style describes ..." and "Systems that adhere to REST strictly meet ...") the answer is correct and to-the-point. "connector" and "component" and "data elements" are not buzzwords... The phrase "Status of the application functionality is split into resources" is the HATEOAS constraint Put simply: whatever you're viewing (the "application") in the browser should be a function of the URL that the browser is looking at. –  mogsie Dec 27 '13 at 15:19
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protected by Shankar Damodaran Jan 15 at 17:55

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