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When using more than 1 IF statement, is there a special guideline that should be followed? Should they be grouped? Should I use parenthesis to wrap the command(s)?

An example to use would be:

IF EXIST somefile.txt IF EXIST someotherfile.txt SET var=somefile.txt,someotherfile.txt
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You can use parenthesis to make blocks in batch files. IF <condition> ( <statements> )... (I find that cleaner/easier to read, personally) –  Brad Christie Jul 15 '11 at 18:34

5 Answers 5

up vote 17 down vote accepted

is there a special guideline that should be followed

There is no "standard" way to do batch files, because the vast majority of their authors and maintainers either don't understand programming concepts, or they think they don't apply to batch files.

But I am a programmer. I'm used to compiling, and I'm used to debuggers. Batch files aren't compiled, and you can't run them through a debugger, so they make me nervous. I suggest you be extra strict on what you write, so you can be very sure it will do what you think it does.

There are some coding standards that say: If you write an if statement, you must use braces, even if you don't have an else clause. This saves you from subtle, hard-to-debug problems, and is unambiguously readable. I see no reason you couldn't apply this reasoning to batch files.

Let's take a look at your code.

IF EXIST somefile.txt IF EXIST someotherfile.txt SET var=somefile.txt,someotherfile.txt

And the IF syntax, from the command, HELP IF:

IF [NOT] ERRORLEVEL number command
IF [NOT] string1==string2 command
IF [NOT] EXISTS filename command

...

IF EXIST filename (
  command
) ELSE (
  other command
)

So you are chaining IF's as commands.

If you use the common coding-standard rule I mentioned above, you would always want to use parens. Here is how you would do so for your example code:

IF EXIST "somefile.txt" (
  IF EXIST "someotherfile.txt" (
    SET var="somefile.txt,someotherfile.txt"
  )
)

Make sure you cleanly format, and do some form of indentation. You do it in code, and you should do it in your batch scripts.

Also, you should also get in the habit of always quoting your file names, and getting the quoting right. There is some verbiage under HELP FOR and HELP SET that will help you with removing extra quotes when re-quoting strings.

Edit

From your comments, and re-reading your original question, it seems like you want to build a comma separated list of files that exist. For this case, you could simply use a bunch of if/else statements, but that would result in a bunch of duplicated logic, and would not be at all clean if you had more than two files.

A better way is to write a sub-routine that checks for a single file's existence, and appends to a variable if the file specified exists. Then just call that subroutine for each file you want to check for:

@ECHO OFF
SETLOCAL

REM Todo: Set global script variables here
CALL :MainScript
GOTO :EOF

REM MainScript()
:MainScript
  SETLOCAL

  CALL :AddIfExists "somefile.txt" "%files%" "files"
  CALL :AddIfExists "someotherfile.txt" "%files%" "files"

  ECHO.Files: %files%

  ENDLOCAL
GOTO :EOF

REM AddIfExists(filename, existingFilenames, returnVariableName)
:AddIfExists
  SETLOCAL

  IF EXIST "%~1" (
    SET "result=%~1"
  ) ELSE (
    SET "result="
  )

  (
    REM Cleanup, and return result - concatenate if necessary
    ENDLOCAL

    IF "%~2"=="" (
      SET "%~3=%result%"
    ) ELSE (
      SET "%~3=%~2,%result%"
    )
  )
GOTO :EOF
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Kewl. Little extra help than needed but better more than less =D. Just a little clarification however... your last code snippet, the command will only execute if both IF conditions are met correct? So if only one of them comply but not the other, the command will never run? –  Mechaflash Jul 15 '11 at 19:05
    
@Mechaflash: Yep. Your original code should do the same thing, but it is less obvious. Did you want or type behavior? Because you're not going to get it from your example code, or mine. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Jul 15 '11 at 19:09
    
Since comments can't be structured, I'll type this in an answer... –  Mechaflash Jul 15 '11 at 19:14
    
@Mechaflash: I edited my answer to add a cleaner and more reusable way to do what you're looking for. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Jul 15 '11 at 23:25

The explanation given by Merlyn above is pretty complete. However, I would like to elaborate on coding standards.

When several IF's are chained, the final command is executed when all the previous conditions are meet; this is equivalent to an AND operator. I used this behavior now and then, but I clearly indicate what I intend to do via an auxiliary Batch variable called AND:

SET AND=IF

IF EXIST somefile.txt %AND% EXIST someotherfile.txt SET var=somefile.txt,someotherfile.txt

Of course, this is NOT a true And operator and must not be used in combination with ELSE clause. This is just a programmer aid to increase the legibility of an instruction that is rarely used.

When I write Batch programs I always use several auxiliary variables that I designed with the sole purpose of write more readable code. For example:

SET AND=IF
SET THEN=(
SET ELSE=) ELSE (
SET NOELSE=
SET ENDIF=)
SET BEGIN=(
SET END=)
SET RETURN=EXIT /B

These variables aids in writting Batch programs in a much clearer way and helps to avoid subtle errors, as Merlyn suggested. For example:

IF EXIST "somefile.txt" %THEN%
  IF EXIST "someotherfile.txt" %THEN%
    SET var="somefile.txt,someotherfile.txt"
  %NOELSE%
  %ENDIF%
%NOELSE%
%ENDIF%

IF EXIST "%~1" %THEN%
  SET "result=%~1"
%ELSE%
  SET "result="
%ENDIF%

I even have variables that aids in writting WHILE-DO and REPEAT-UNTIL like constructs. This means that Batch variables may be used in some degree as preprocessor values.

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1  
1:This is like the "Painting-By-Numbers" version of programming haha –  Mechaflash Jul 22 '11 at 16:35
    
Thanks for the idea. This is an interesting technique, and I like alternatives. But god do I hate textual macros that can't be compile-time checked :) I much prefer to limit my use of batch file variables to places where you'd use traditional variables. My exception to this self-imposed rule is when expanding the fully-qualified path to an executable, ala SET editor=C:\Windows\notepad.exe %editor% someOutputFile.txt –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Mar 23 '12 at 8:35
1  
@MerlynMorgan-Graham: Well, Batch files have many limitations, so this technique may help to write clearer Batch files. However, this method may also be used in amazing ways! Check this post dostips.com/forum/… and the origin post dostips.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1827 –  Aacini Mar 25 '12 at 5:40
IF EXIST "somefile.txt" (
  IF EXIST "someotherfile.txt" (
    SET var="somefile.txt","someotherfile.txt"
  )
) ELSE (
  CALL :SUB
)
:SUB
ECHO Sorry... nothin' there.
GOTO:EOF

Is this feasible?

SETLOCAL ENABLEDELAYEDEXPANSION
IF EXIST "somefile.txt" (
  SET var="somefile.txt"
  IF EXIST "someotherfile.txt" (
    SET var=!var!,"someotherfile.txt"
  )
) ELSE (
  IF EXIST "someotherfile.txt" (
    SET var="someotherfile.txt"
  ) ELSE (
  GOTO:EOF
  )
)
share|improve this answer
1  
1; This will definitely work, though obviously isn't the most bulletproof way if you ever have to maintain the file, and is going to be a huge mess if you ever extend it to 3 files. But at least it is easy to understand, and has good use of parens :) –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Jul 15 '11 at 23:29
    
I know it's not expandable-friendly but I'm a sucker for supermodel code (skinny, and light weight... not too complex, but is high maintenance) haha. However, I'll mark yours as the correct answer as it is how the code should be written, and you definitely know how to write clean, organized code. Kudos –  Mechaflash Jul 18 '11 at 15:31
    
I upvoted this one because I thought it was a good answer, given the current requirements. Feel free to mark whichever as accepted that is the most useful for you. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Jul 18 '11 at 16:44
    
WHOOPS! made a nub mistake. Missing a paren –  Mechaflash Jul 19 '11 at 15:03

Batch files have really very limited logic powers so the best you can hope to come up with is a good workaround that indirectly achieves what you want. That's not to say that you should feel they are inferior to a real language - they still demand the same attention to detail and manual debugging as a real application. It's just that you'll need to work a lot harder to make them do what you want in a robust manner.

For the OP's question it sounds like you require two specific files to exist. Just use a tally:

IF EXIST somefile.txt (
    set /a file1_status=1
)

IF EXIST someotehrfile.txt (
    set /a file2_status=1
)

set /a file_status_result=file1_status + file2_status

if %file_status_result% equ 2 (
    goto somefileexists
)

goto exit

:somefileexists
IF EXIST someotherfile.txt SET var=...

:exit

My example uses 3 variables, but you could just add 1 to file_result_status if the file exists. But if you want more granular control later in your batch file you can record the result for each file as I have done so you don't have to keep checking if a file exists later on.

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You can structurize your batch file by using goto

IF EXIST somefile.txt goto somefileexists
goto exit

:somefileexists
IF EXIST someotherfile.txt SET var=...

:exit
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You should use CALL to call subroutines and GOTO :EOF to exit them. Do this for the same reason you would want to call functions and return from them, rather than use GOTO (e.g. in C). Avoid spaghetti scripts :) –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Jul 15 '11 at 19:00
    
CALL is used for calling other batch files. Hence without call it's executed as simple jump (you go to another batch file and do not return) –  Mike Mozhaev Jul 15 '11 at 19:02
1  
It is also used for calling subroutines within the same batch file. From HELP CALL: CALL command now accepts labels as the target of the CALL. The syntax is - CALL :label arguments. In your example, it would be CALL :SomeFileExists. Try it :) –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Jul 15 '11 at 19:04
    
So if I do IF EXIST "somefile.txt" CALL :NEXT ---- :NEXT (break) LINES OF CODE HERE (break) GOTO:EOF. The GOTO:EOF is then used to just end the current subroutine? –  Mechaflash Jul 15 '11 at 19:13
    
In this case yes –  Mike Mozhaev Jul 15 '11 at 19:16

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