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I want to test a class method that calls upon a parent method with the same name. Is there a way to do this?

class Parent {

    function foo() {
        echo 'bar';
    }
}

class Child {

    function foo() {
            $foo = parent::foo();
            return $foo;
    }
}

class ChildTest extend PHPUnit_TestCase {

    function testFoo() {
        $mock = $this->getMock('Child', array('foo'));

        //how do i mock parent methods and simulate responses?
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
i will pass that on to my team – james Jul 15 '11 at 18:42
    
@james, what is an unit in this case? – takeshin Jul 15 '11 at 18:59
1  
This is impossible because you'd need to interject a mock subclass between Parent and Child. – David Harkness Jul 15 '11 at 20:22
    
i'm thinking i can just modify the child class by wrapping the call to the parent method in some other mockable method. – james Jul 15 '11 at 20:42
up vote 10 down vote accepted

You dont mock or stub methods in the Subject-under-Test (SUT). If you feel you have the need to mock or stub a method in the parent of the SUT, it likely means you shouldnt have used inheritance, but aggregation.

You mock dependencies of the Subject-under-Test. That means any other objects the SUT requires to do work.

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1  
well you can still mock a sut's own methods, e.g. self mock. – james Jul 15 '11 at 20:41
    
@James do you mean Self Shunting? – Gordon Jul 16 '11 at 7:55
    
yes, but I am not aware of a way to self shunt a parent method. – james Jul 17 '11 at 15:07

An approach that works to my is the implementation of a wrap to the parent call on the child class, and finally mock those wrap.

You code modified:

class Parent {

    function foo() {
        echo 'bar';
    }
}

class Child {

    function foo() {
            $foo = $this->parentFooCall();
            return $foo;
    }
    function parentFooCall() {
            return parent::foo();
    }
}

class ChildTest extend PHPUnit_TestCase {

    function testFoo() {
        $mock = $this->getMock('Child', array('foo', 'parentFooCall'));

        //how do i mock parent methods and simulate responses?
    }
 }
share|improve this answer
4  
the problem with this approach is that you're implementing methods on the child purely for testing purposes, which is not a good approach to development. – Oddman Aug 11 '13 at 17:33
1  
And then you can't unit test parentFooCall() – Edson Medina Oct 17 '14 at 14:46

Here is how I did it, I have no idea if this is correct but it works:

class parentClass {
    public function whatever() {
        $this->doSomething();
    }
}

class childClass extends parentClass {
    public $variable;
    public function subjectUnderTest() {
        $this->variable = 'whocares';
        parent::whatever();
    }
}

now in the test i do:

public function testSubjectUnderTest() {
    $ChildClass = $this->getMock('childClass', array('doSomething'))
    $ChildClass->expects($this->once())
               ->method('doSomething');
    $ChildClass->subjectUnderTest();
    $this->assertEquals('whocares', $ChildClass->variable);
}

what the ?

My reasoning here is that all i really want to test is whether or not my variable got set. i don't really care about what happens in the parent method but since you can't prevent the parent method from being called what i do is mock the dependent methods of the parent method.

now go ahead and tell me i'm wrong :)

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I'd like to know too if this is the best approach, since the legacy project i'm trying to cover does this a lot.. – qrazi Feb 8 '13 at 12:55
1  
technically you're not mocking the parent method call, so it's not exactly an accurate answer to the original question. What the op needs to do, is mock the whatever() call, not the subsequent call that whatever() itself makes. – Oddman Aug 11 '13 at 17:34

I'm totally agree with @Gordon. I have same issue but I have tried few tricky concept.

My scenario is like

class Parent { // Actual-Parent Class
    function save() {
        // do something
        return $this
    }
}

class Child extends Parent {
   // Subject under test
    function save() {
          // do something
          return parent::save();
    }
}

I have created another parent class with same name "Parent" and treat as a stub and include my stub class(parent) and ignore to actual parent (Actual parent class set into auto-load and stub-parent must be be included )

class Parent { //Stub-Parent class
    function save() {
        return $this
    }
}

Now I create mock object of Child class (via Mock-builder) and complete my test cases with end of assertSame. :-)

$this->assertSame($mock, $mock->save());
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1  
I don't understand what you mean by "include my stub class(parent) and ignore to actual parent". Could you show how you do this? – Daryl Spitzer Apr 3 '14 at 15:44
    
This approach can be dangerous. Say you have a class, Parent, that you want to create a hard-coded, manually written mock for, and ignore the real Parent class (just like the given example). PHP could have already, because of an invocation in another class, autoloaded Parent, in which case there will be a fatal "cannot redeclare" error when one attempts to include the fake class. But, danger aside, the way to do it would just be to write a small php file with the fake class defined inside, and manually include that file from the test, so the real class won't have to be autoloaded. – dalesikkema May 6 '15 at 20:05
    
@dalesikkema : I have already handled it before starting test cases. I have write my own autoloader for test cases. :P Even you can take reference from Joomla github repo – Manish Trivedi May 7 '15 at 12:18

A satisfying solution in my opinion is to create a class that inherits from your class under test and override the implementation of the method you want to give another implementation. This has its flaws: it does not always work, e.g. for already overridden methods and for private methods.

class Parent
{
    function bar()
    {
        echo 'bar';
    }
}

class Child extends Parent
{
    function foo()
    {
        parent::bar();
        echo 'foo';
    }
}

class mockChild extends Child
{
    function bar()
    {
        echo 'baz';
    }
}

class ChildTest extends PHPUnit_TestCase 
{
    function testFoo() {
        $sut = new mockChild();
        $sut->foo();
    }
} 
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