Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Understanding Python decorators

I was reading a django app source code where I find this

@login_required
def activities(request = None,\
            project_id = 0,\
            task_id = 0,\
            ...

What does the line that start with @ mean?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Blackmoon, Wooble, S.Lott, C. A. McCann, Bo Persson Jul 17 '11 at 15:56

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Please check out Python Decorators Explained. It has an amazing answer that will explain everything.

share|improve this answer
add comment

It's a decorator. What it does is basically wrap the function. It is equivalent with this code:

def activities(request = None,\
            project_id = 0,\
            task_id = 0,\
            ...
activities = login_required(activities)

It is used for checking function arguments (in this case request.session), modifying arguments (it may give the function other arguments than it passes), and maybe some other stuff.

share|improve this answer
add comment

It's a decorator, which is a special type of function (or class, in some cases) in Python that modifies another function's behavior. See this article.

@decorator
def my_func():
    pass

is really just a special syntax for

def my_func():
    pass
my_func = decorator(my_func)
share|improve this answer
add comment

It is a decorator. It's a syntatic sugar for:

def activities(request = None,\
            project_id = 0,\
            task_id = 0,\
            ...

activities = login_required(activities)
share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.