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I came across a code like this

synchronized(obj) {

   obj = new Object();

}

Something does not feel right about this , I am unable to explain, Is this piece of code OK or there is something really wrong in it, please point it out. Thanks

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2 Answers 2

It's probably not what you want to do. You're synchronizing on an object that you're no longer holding a reference to. Consider another thread running this method: they may enter and try to hit the lock at the moment after the reference to obj has been updated to point to the new object. At that point, they're synchronizing on a different object than the first thread. This is probably not what you're expecting.

Unless you have a good reason not to, you probably want to synchronize on a final Object (for visibility's sake.) In this case, you would probably want to use a separate lock variable. For example:

class Foo
{
    private final Object lock = new Object();
    private Object obj;

    public void method()
    {
        synchronized(lock)
        {
            obj = new Object();
        }
    }
}
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+1 - more complete answer than I gave :) –  aperkins Jul 15 '11 at 19:03

This is a case where someone might think what they are doing is OK, but it probably isn't what they intended. In this case, you are synchronizing on the current value in the obj variable. Once you create a new instance and place it in the obj variable, the lock conditions will change. If that is all that is occurring in this block, it will probably work - but if it is doing anything else afterwards, the object will not be properly synchronized.

Better to be safe and synchronize on the containing object, or on another mutex entirely.

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