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I need to run both sort! and uniq! on an array. Which is better to run first? Or is there a way to combine these into one command?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I made a little benchmark test with different combinations of uniq uniq! sort and sort! There are no significant differences:

                user     system      total        real
sort!.uniq!103.547000   0.172000 103.719000 (104.093750)
uniq!.sort!100.437000   0.093000 100.530000 (100.859375)
uniq.sort 100.516000   0.157000 100.673000 (101.031250)
sort.uniq 103.563000   0.062000 103.625000 (103.843750)

What you may not use is something like:

array = [1]
array.uniq!.sort!

uniq! will result in nil and sort! will throw an exception.

The benchmark I used:

require 'benchmark'
require 'date'

TEST_LOOPS = 10_000
ARRAY = []
1000.times{ 
  ARRAY << Date.new(1900 + rand(100), rand(11)+1, rand(27) + 1 ) 
}
Benchmark.bm(10) {|b|

  b.report('sort!.uniq!') {
   TEST_LOOPS.times { 
      a = ARRAY.dup
      a.sort!
      a.uniq!
   }            #Testloops
  }             #b.report

  b.report('uniq!.sort!') {
   TEST_LOOPS.times { 
      a = ARRAY.dup
      # uniq!.sort! not possible. uniq! may get nil
      a.uniq!
      a.sort!
   }            #Testloops
  }             #b.report

  b.report('uniq.sort') {
   TEST_LOOPS.times { 
      a = ARRAY.dup.uniq.sort
   }            #Testloops
  }             #b.report

  b.report('sort.uniq') {
   TEST_LOOPS.times { 
      a = ARRAY.dup.sort.uniq
   }            #Testloops
  }             #b.report

} #Benchmark
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for providing a benchmark test and for pointing out the potential problem with .uniq!.sort! –  David Oneill Jul 18 '11 at 14:07
    
This is not a good benchmark because the performance difference between .uniq.sort! and .sort!.uniq! is highly dependent on the data being sorted. You're testing the same pseudorandom array over and over again, so if it has very few duplicate elements (which I think is the case here), the effect of uniq will be negligible. –  Max Feb 25 at 17:27
    
This is also in the other answer stackoverflow.com/a/21376982/676874 . (and I would recommend the asker to accept the other answer). –  knut Feb 25 at 19:12

In fact, it depends from the number of unique values. In the example of knut, the start set could include at most 365 unique values out of 1000, and the order of operations seemed without influence.

if 'uniq' significantly reduces the array size, there is a distinct advantage in running it first.

A=[]
10_000.times do
  A << rand(80)
end

Benchmark.bm(10) do |b|
  b.report "sort.uniq" do
    10_000.times {A.sort.uniq}
  end
  b.report "uniq.sort" do
    10_000.times {A.uniq.sort}
  end
end

                 user     system      total        real
sort.uniq   20.202000   0.281000  20.483000 ( 20.978098)
uniq.sort    9.298000   0.000000   9.298000 (  9.355936)

I did not test the '.uniq!.sort!' permutations, but I believe that they should follow the above result.

This example may be a little extreme, but I do not see why one should not always run '.uniq' first

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It really doesn't matter which way you do this. I guess the uniq first so it results in less items to sort with one pass through the array. So you can do

 a=[3,3,3,3,6,7,1,1,1,1,3]
 a.uniq!
 a.sort!
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1  
Would I need to do array_name.uniq!.sort!? Or is the first ! unnecessary? –  David Oneill Jul 15 '11 at 19:22
    
The first ! is unnecessary because that means it is replacing your original array. The uniq does not have to replace it because it is passing the return value to sort! which will then replace your original array with the final value. –  Michael Papile Jul 15 '11 at 19:24
    
That is not true! You first get a copy by uniq, and then this copy is replaced by sort!. So if you want to sort and make uniq in place, you have to use both uniq! and sort!. Try it out in irb and test with equal?. –  mliebelt Jul 15 '11 at 19:32
    
and what would be the practical use for doing that? The end result is the same –  Michael Papile Jul 15 '11 at 19:36
1  
You shouldn't combine uniq! and sort! in this sequence, it may end with an exception. Look what happens with [1].uniq!.sort! uniq! returns nil and sort! will will throw an exception. When you first sort! then you could use uniq! afterwords. Or you splitt it into two calls. –  knut Jul 15 '11 at 20:57

Running one or the other first depends on the needs of your application.

1) Unless you have huge arrays, run the one first that makes the most sense. Are you using the sorted or uniqued array elsewhere? Does one order conform more naturally to the logic of your application.

2) If you have huge arrays, and I mean huge based on a real measured determination that your code is taking too long in running array.sort!.uniq! then you might try the other order and see. If you have a lot of duplicates, then array.uniq!.sort! might be marginally faster.

3) If you are worried about speed, you'll probably want to use sort_by. See for example, http://paulsturgess.co.uk/articles/show/85-ruby-on-rails-sort_by-vs-sort

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This is an array of Dates, so I didn't define the sort (IE I'm just running array_name.sort! without sort{how to sort}. Would sort_by still be an advantage? If so, what would I pass into sort_by? –  David Oneill Jul 15 '11 at 20:21
    
If you use array.uniq!.sort! you may get an exception. Just try [1].uniq!.sort! –  knut Jul 15 '11 at 21:11
    
True, Array#uniq! returns nil if the array is already unique, but doing array.uniq.sort! isn't going to accomplish what David asked. array won't be sorted. –  Ray Baxter Jul 15 '11 at 23:33

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