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I can perform the following SQL Server selection of distinct (or non-repeating names) from a column in one table like so:

SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT [Name]) FROM [MyTable]

But what if I have more than one table (all these tables contain the name field called [Name]) and I need to know the count of non-repeating names in two or more tables.

If I run something like this:

SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT [Name]) FROM [MyTable1], [MyTable2], [MyTable3]

I get an error, "Ambiguous column name 'Name'".

PS. All three tables [MyTable1], [MyTable2], [MyTable3] are a product of a previous selection.

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Do you want count from all three tables? or just from one of them? –  EricZ Jul 15 '11 at 19:23
1  
What do you mean by "non-repeating names"? –  OMG Ponies Jul 15 '11 at 19:27
    
OK, say, MyTable1's [Name] column has values: "John", "Mary", "John", "Aaron". MyTable2's [Name] column has values: "Mary", "Aaron", "Aaron", "Mary". MyTable3's [Name] column has values: "John", "Mary", "John", "John". I need to get the count, such as: "John" = 5 times, "Mary" = 4 times, "Aaron" = 3 times. –  ahmd0 Jul 15 '11 at 19:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

After the clarification, use:

  SELECT x.name, COUNT(x.[name])
    FROM (SELECT [name]
            FROM [MyTable]
          UNION ALL
          SELECT [name]
            FROM [MyTable2]
          UNION ALL
          SELECT [name]
            FROM [MyTable3]) x
GROUP BY x.name

If I understand correctly, use:

  SELECT x.name, COUNT(DISTINCT x.[name])
    FROM (SELECT [name]
            FROM [MyTable]
          UNION ALL
          SELECT [name]
            FROM [MyTable2]
          UNION ALL
          SELECT [name]
            FROM [MyTable3]) x
GROUP BY x.name

UNION will remove duplicates; UNION ALL will not, and is faster for it.

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I think you have covered all options now :) +1 –  Mikael Eriksson Jul 15 '11 at 19:42
    
And, the UNION ALL is the right way to go, no matter which solution is used :) –  bobs Jul 15 '11 at 19:43
    
Guys, I apologize for misleading you. I'm just learning SQL. I'm also curious, will this code handle names in a case-sensitive matter, i.e. "John" and "john" count as 2, or as 1? –  ahmd0 Jul 15 '11 at 19:47
2  
@ahmd0 - case sensitivity is based on your server-level Collation settings. –  JNK Jul 15 '11 at 19:50
1  
COUNT(DISTINCT ...) on the grouping key will always result in 1. –  Markus Jarderot Jul 15 '11 at 20:54

EDIT: Had to change after seeing recent comment.

Does this give you what you want? This gives a count for each person after combining the rows from all tables.

SELECT [NAME], COUNT(*) as TheCount
FROM
    (
     SELECT [Name] FROM [MyTable1]
     UNION ALL
     SELECT [Name] FROM [MyTable2]
     UNION ALL
     SELECT [Name] FROM [MyTable3]
     ) AS [TheNames]
GROUP BY [NAME]
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I'll have to test it as well. –  ahmd0 Jul 15 '11 at 19:50

Here's another way:

SELECT x.name, SUM(x.cnt)
FROM ( SELECT [name], COUNT(*) AS cnt
       FROM [MyTable]
       GROUP BY [name]
     UNION ALL
       SELECT [name], COUNT(*) AS cnt
       FROM [MyTable2]
       GROUP BY [name]
     UNION ALL
       SELECT [name], COUNT(*) AS cnt
       FROM [MyTable3]
       GROUP BY [name]
     ) AS x
GROUP BY x.name
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