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I am getting into testing in python and I asked myself how to test this method.

def get_response(self, url, params):
    encoded_params = urllib.urlencode(params)
    request = urllib2.Request(BASE_URL, headers=HEADERS)
    response = urllib2.urlopen(request, encoded_params)
    return response

Using doctest or unittest, how is this best achieved? I thought of passing get_response() a test url and some test parameters, which exists in real world and to check if response.read() returns the expected data. But somehow I feel, this is not the way it should be done. Any suggestions? I would appreciate suggestions how to handle such cases in context of texting.

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First, define the contract the method should adhere to. The post outlines testing the accepted response, but now how failures should be handled. Testing the actual data, however, sounds like more of an integration test. –  user166390 Jul 15 '11 at 21:06
2  
Have a look at the (BSD-licensed) scikit-learn code that does exactly this; testcases, mock_urllib2. –  larsmans Jul 15 '11 at 21:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is a good opportunity to use a mock testing framework, such as minimock.

BASE_URL='http://google.com'
HEADERS = {"accept-language":"klingon"}
import urllib, urllib2
def get_response(self, url, params):
    r"""
    >>> from minimock import Mock
    >>> urllib2.Request = Mock('urllib2.Request')
    >>> urllib2.urlopen = Mock('urllib2.urlopen')
    >>> get_response(None, 'http://google.com', {'foo':'bar'})
    Called urllib2.Request(
        'http://google.com',
        headers={'accept-language': 'klingon'})
    Called urllib2.urlopen(None, 'foo=bar')
    >>> 
    """
    encoded_params = urllib.urlencode(params)
    request = urllib2.Request(BASE_URL, headers=HEADERS)
    response = urllib2.urlopen(request, encoded_params)
    return response

Do note that the unit is embedded in the docstring for the function under test, in doctest format.

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This is a good case for using fake objects:

# my_module
get_url = urllib2.urlopen

def get_response(self, url, params):
    encoded_params = urllib.urlencode(params)
    request = urllib2.Request(BASE_URL, headers=HEADERS)
    response = get_url(request, encoded_params)
    return response

# test_my_module    
def fake_get_url(request, params):
    assert request == "the url I expect"
    assert params == ['the', 'params', 'i', 'expect']
    return SomeFakeResponse("OK")

my_module.get_url = fake_get_url
assert my_module.get_response("blah", "blah").content == "OK"

This is just the sketchiest sketch of how you could override the real urllib2.urlopen function with your own fake implementation to test your code without really hitting the web.

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