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I have people, companies and employees. Each of those tables has a foreign key back to a table I call parties, which maintains a sibling record through triggers. Parties have 0 to N site_locators, which itself reference sites, which reference cities.

I'm building a view that will return the addressee's full name and it's city. The code as it stands is thus:

  SELECT
      surname
    , rest_of_name
    , 'Employee'  AS party_type_code
    , party_id
    , cities.name AS city_name
  FROM
              employees
    LEFT JOIN site_locators USING (party_id)
    LEFT JOIN sites         USING (site_id)
    LEFT JOIN cities        USING (city_id)
UNION ALL
  SELECT
      surname
    , NULL::text
    , 'Company'  AS party_type_code
    , party_id
    , cities.name AS city_name
  FROM
              companies
    LEFT JOIN site_locators USING (party_id)
    LEFT JOIN sites         USING (site_id)
    LEFT JOIN cities        USING (city_id)
UNION ALL
  SELECT
      surname
    , rest_of_name
    , 'Person'  AS party_type_code
    , party_id
    , cities.name AS city_name
  FROM
              people
    LEFT JOIN site_locators USING (party_id)
    LEFT JOIN sites         USING (site_id)
    LEFT JOIN cities        USING (city_id)

I don't really like the multiple LEFT JOINs on each UNION. I refactored the code to do the JOINs only once as a separate step:

SELECT
    parties.*
  , cities.name AS city_name
FROM (
    SELECT /* As above, minus city_name */
    FROM employees
  UNION ALL
    SELECT /* As above, minus city_name */
    FROM companies
  UNION ALL
    SELECT /* As above, minus city_name */
    FROM people
  ) AS parties
  LEFT JOIN site_locators USING (party_id)
  LEFT JOIN sites         USING (site_id)
  LEFT JOIN cities        USING (city_id)

This second query is faster, because the JOINs only happen once after all tables are filtered. What I'm wondering is if I can refactor this further such that if site_locators returns no rows for a party, then I don't even need to search for sites or cities? I'm wondering if this can be rewritten with some INNER JOINs rather than all LEFT JOINs. I've had a bad experience with LEFT JOINs previously and want to reduce the number of them.

NOTE: The parties table exists to reduce the number of tables. If it wasn't present, I'd need tables for each party type and locator type: employee_site_locators, people_site_locators, company_site_locators, employee_email_locators, people_email_locators and so on. With the parties table, I can have a single *_locator table per locator type.

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1  
If you need your rows to always have data present in all the listed tables, changing the LEFT JOINs to INNER JOINs will accomplish that, and should also restrict the scope of the search. You should (probably) be able to leave the query otherwise as-is, because most modern optimizers mess with join order regardless. –  Clockwork-Muse Jul 15 '11 at 21:13
    
I understand the difference between LEFT and INNER join. The data in the city_name column is optional: if it exists, I want it. If it's absent, it's fine, thus my use of LEFT JOIN. –  François Beausoleil Jul 16 '11 at 14:35
    
Okay, sorry, that wasn't stated as part of your requirements (or at least, I didn't read that in it). In which case, the left joins are probably going to be the best you're going to get; unless some of the subsequent joins can be re-written with inner joins. Without knowing your table structure and desired results, though, it's a little difficult to judge exactly what can be changed in this manner. –  Clockwork-Muse Jul 18 '11 at 15:34
    
It won't help with the JOIN, but this looks like a situation where PG's table inheritance capability might unclutter things. The relationship between parties and employees, persons, and companies looks like creating an inheritance structure on the fly. –  Andrew Lazarus Jul 20 '11 at 0:27

1 Answer 1

First, that first refactor is very good.

Secondly, yes left joins constrain the planner. However blocking these into blocks of inner joins with an outer join back in constrains the planner in more ways, and these are bigger limitations. In general I have seen planners less able to use indexes when left joins are factored out the way you describe.

In general, it is best to focus on clarity first, and then look at tweaking to perform better than to worry about performance first and work on clarity later. One thing that will help though is replacing USING with ON. Finally look at your model and see what is really a left join and what is an inner join. Note these are very different so they can't be substituted directly.

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You believe ON is clearer than USING? USING reduces total word count, which, in my opinion, makes things much easier to read. How does ON increase clarity? –  François Beausoleil Jun 12 '13 at 13:15

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