Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Exploring Google's +1 Button, I found two things odd about the code they supply:

<script type="text/javascript" src="https://apis.google.com/js/plusone.js">
  {lang: 'en-GB'}
</script>

<g:plusone size="tall" href="http://www.google.com"></g:plusone>

So I have two questions:
First:       How is Google able to use the text between the script tags?
Second:  Is the syntax <g:plusone ... HTML valid? What's this called?

share|improve this question
1  
It isn't namespaced XML since xmlns:g is never specified. –  Quentin Jul 15 '11 at 21:21
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

How is Google able to use the text between the script tags?

<script> elements are perfectly visible in the DOM:

<script type="text/javascript">//FIRST SCRIPT BLOCK</script>

<script type="text/javascript">
    var s= document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0];
    alert(s.textContent); // "//FIRST SCRIPT BLOCK"
</script>

Google's sneaky trick is to put content in a <script> that has an external src. In this case the src overrides the content inside the block and executes the external script instead, but the contents of the <script> element are still readable through the DOM even though they do nothing.

Is the syntax <g:plusone ... HTML valid? What's this called?

No. If they made their own doctype for HTML+plusone it could be valid that, but it doesn't satisfy validity for HTML, and it isn't even namespace-well-formed in an XHTML document, unless you add an extra xmlns:g for it too.

share|improve this answer
    
I hate it if you think it's a trick. It's CS. –  Phpdna Jul 15 '11 at 21:35
    
I'm not sure if I would trust var s= document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; What if the script we want access to is not the first script element? –  Shaz Jul 15 '11 at 21:39
3  
Yeah, that's just an example. In fact what they will be doing is reading the last script in the ByTagName list, not the first. Because the page is only partially loaded at run-time, the last <script> will be the one you're currently executing. (Unless you use defer or async.) –  bobince Jul 15 '11 at 21:47
add comment

The first trick is interesting. It looks like a creative way to pass "global" arguments from the page markup to external scripts. There are ways to find the <script> element that sources the code that's currently running, and I would not be surprised if the inner text of that <script> element was accessible from the DOM even though the browser ignores it.

In your question, this pattern allows each external client-side script to use (at least) its own localization settings, and also allows server-side code to render that parameter as a side effect of rendering the <script> element itself. That's impressive.

The second trick, I'm not so sure about. Basically, I think most browsers would consider the namespaced <g:plusone> element as unknown or even invalid, so they should render its content, but it won't do anything, of course, since that element is empty to begin with.

However, client-side code might still be able to match the namespaced element using DOM navigation, and replace it with its own generated content.

share|improve this answer
    
I hate it if you think it's a trick. It's CS. –  Phpdna Jul 15 '11 at 21:34
2  
@Jitamaro, you mean there's no tricky CS? ;) –  Frédéric Hamidi Jul 15 '11 at 21:39
    
Sure it is. But it's a difficult question. –  Phpdna Jul 15 '11 at 21:48
add comment

Is the syntax <g:plusone ... HTML valid?

No

What's this called?

Invalid psuedo-namespaces

share|improve this answer
    
Is XML character ":" not specified? First off ":" is just an ASCII symbol. I'm not sure how Google is using it? Is this a class variable? –  Phpdna Jul 15 '11 at 21:26
    
@Quentin This certainly helps, as I found w3c documentation on HTML5 Namespaces –  Shaz Jul 15 '11 at 21:30
add comment

Simple and Valid (Standard Size Button)

First add this line

<script type="text/javascript" src="https://apis.google.com/js/plusone.js">

Then add this line where you want to show the button

<div class="g-plusone"></div>

Check working button here http://www.peexa.com

share|improve this answer
add comment
  1. Maybe it's a JSON and they access it through DOM
  2. It's XHTML valid
share|improve this answer
2  
It isn't XHTML valid. If there was a defined namespace for g then it might be a valid mixed-namespace document. It wouldn't be XHTML. –  Quentin Jul 15 '11 at 21:20
    
@Quentin: Is XML character ":" not specified? First off ":" is just an ASCII symbol. I'm not sure how Google is using it? Is this a class variable? –  Phpdna Jul 15 '11 at 21:36
2  
— in HTML terms it is nonsense. In XML terms it would be a namespace if the root element had xmlns:g="some namespace" but since that is missing, it is also nonsense in XML terms. –  Quentin Jul 15 '11 at 21:48
    
I like non-sense. It's meaning is useless. –  Phpdna Jul 15 '11 at 22:14
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.