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Ok so i have the following code setup which seems to work fine:

user handler "module":

class user_handler
{
    private $dbo;

    public function __construct($dbo)
    {
        $this->dbo = $dbo;
    }

    public function user_table_method()
    {
        $this->dbo->generic_db_method();
    }
}

the connection class:

class connection
{
    private $dbc;

    public $user;

    public function __construct()
    {
        $this->dbc = 'connection';
        $this->user = new user_handler($this);
    }

    public function generic_db_method()
    {
        echo '<p>doing stuff with ' . $this->dbc . '</p>';
    }
}

Then i can access user handler methods like so:

$dbc = new connection();
$dbc->user->user_table_method();

My question is this:

Would it be possible with a method in the connection class to create the _user object only when it's required?

What i'm thinking of is a method that would be used like so:

$dbc->add_handle('user', 'user_handler');

Which would create a new public property called user from scratch and set it as a new user_handler object:

// in more detail
public function add_handle($name, $module)
{
    if(!isset($this->/*somehow use $name*/))
    {
        $this->/*somehow use $name*/ = new /*somehow use $module*/();
    }
}

..so the new way to set it up would be like:

$dbc = new connection();
$dbc->add_handle('user', 'user_handler');
$dbc->user->user_table_method();

Thanks in advance! (looking at php 5.2 and up)

share|improve this question
1  
You should not start your public variables or methods with an underscore. That is confusing, man. –  Mike Jul 16 '11 at 2:02
    
Well i'm a php oop novice, so excuse the confusing-ness lol, please feel free to enlighten me as to what makes it so confusing? :) –  Jason Rogers Jul 16 '11 at 2:11
1  
Naming methods or properties starting with an underscore is generally for private methods or properties, not public. See pear.php.net/manual/en/standards.naming.php –  Mike Jul 16 '11 at 2:18
    
thanks for the clarity :) - i updated the post. –  Jason Rogers Jul 16 '11 at 2:28
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted
public function add_handle($name, $module)
{
    if(!isset($this->$name))
    {
        $this->$name = new $module();
    }
}

Then you would just do similar to how you were thinking:

$dbc = new connection();
$name = 'user';
$module = 'somemodule';
$dbc->add_handle($name, $module);
$dbc->user->user_table_method();

I've also renamed it from $_user to $user as I mentioned in the comment since it is public.

share|improve this answer
    
This would work for the one item.. it needs to take the given values and work with those though - otherwise im going to have write several add_handle() methods, one for every possible handler "module" –  Jason Rogers Jul 16 '11 at 2:16
    
How many do you have? You could either use a switch in the add_handle() method or create multiple add_handle_* methods, one for each type. –  Mike Jul 16 '11 at 2:27
    
In most cases you only need to have one database handle in a script, unless you specifically need to talk to two different databases. –  Mike Jul 16 '11 at 2:29
    
..i added a more detailed description of what add_handle() should be doing to the question. It needs to use 2 supplied arguments. Also let me clarify what's going on - The connection object contains generic insert/update/delete methods. The user_handle contains information relative to only the user/member table and has lots of helper methods for specifically working with that table each helper method in user_handle makes use of the generic access methods in the connection object –  Jason Rogers Jul 16 '11 at 2:32
1  
Just take the comments out and use the variables. It should work. –  Mike Jul 16 '11 at 2:38
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