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The title is the self-contained question. An example clarifies it: Consider

x=list(a=1, b="name")
f <- function(){
    assign('y[["d"]]', FALSE, parent.frame() )
}
g <- function(y) {f(); print(y)}

g(x)

$a
[1] 1

$b
[1] "name"

whereas I would like to get

g(x)

$a
[1] 1

$b
[1] "name"

$d
[1] FALSE

A few remarks. I knew what is wrong in my original example, but am using it to make clear my objective. I want to avoid <<-, and want x to be changed in the parent frame.

I think my understanding of environments is primitive, and any references are appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
What are you trying to do? Modifying variables outside of the current scope is generally a really bad idea. – hadley Jul 16 '11 at 14:18
    
I am trying to avoid passing by value a very large object to a function which is called repeatedly. The function also modifies part of the object. Using static globals is not recommended in any language, but is sometimes useful. – gappy Jul 18 '11 at 0:41
    
Have you profiled passing around the object and discovered that it's a problem? R is not going to copy the object unless you modify it, which you're doing here anyway. It's not obvious that this more complicated approach will actually save you time. – hadley Jul 18 '11 at 15:00
up vote 6 down vote accepted

The first argument to assign must be a variable name, not the character representation of an expression. Try replacing f with:

f <- function() with(parent.frame(), y$d <- FALSE)

Note that a, b and d are list components, not list attributes. If we wanted to add an attribute "d" to y in f's parent frame we would do this:

f <- function() with(parent.frame(), attr(y, "d") <- FALSE)

Also, note that depending on what you want to do it may (or may not) be better to have x be an environment or a proto object (from the proto package).

share|improve this answer

assign's first argument needs to be an object name. Your use of assign is basically the same as the counter-example at the end of the the assign help page. Observe:

> x=list(a=1, b="name")
> f <- function(){
+     assign('x["d"]', FALSE, parent.frame() )
+ }
> g <- function(y) {f(); print(`x["d"]`)}
> g(x)
[1] FALSE   # a variable with the name `x["d"]` was created

This may be where you want to use "<<-" but it's generally considered suspect.

> f <- function(){
+     x$d <<- FALSE
+ }
> g <- function(y) {f(); print(y)}
> g(x)
$a
[1] 1

$b
[1] "name"

$d
[1] FALSE

A further thought, offered in the absence of any goal for this exercise and ignoring the term "attributes" which Gabor has pointed out has a specific meaning in R, but may not have been your goal. If all you want is the output to match your specs then this achieves that goal but take notice that no alteration of x in the global environment is occurring.

> f <- function(){
+     assign('y', c(x, d=FALSE), parent.frame() )
+ }
> g <- function(y) {f(); print(y)}
> g(x)
$a
[1] 1

$b
[1] "name"

$d
[1] FALSE

> x    # `x` is unchanged
$a
[1] 1

$b
[1] "name"

The parent.frame for f is what might be called the "interior of g but the alteration does not propagate out to the global environment.

share|improve this answer
    
It's not that <<- is suspect - it's any assignment outside the local environment. – hadley Jul 16 '11 at 14:16

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