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I'm using rails and I want to make it so that `attr_accessor :politics' is set, by default, to false.

Does anyone know how to do this and is able to explain it in simple terms for me?

How do I make this happen, btw, im new to rails

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6 Answers 6

up vote 51 down vote accepted

Rails has attr_accessor_with_default so you could write

class Like
  attr_accessor_with_default :politics,false
end

i = Like.new
i.politics #=> false

and thats all

UPDATE

attr_accessor_with_default has been deprecated in Rails 3.2.. you could do this instead with pure Ruby

class Like
  attr_writer :politics

  def politics
    @politics || false
  end
end

i = Like.new
i.politics #=> false
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7  
Note that the example only works for a default of false. I needed a default of true, so I used: @politics.nil? ? true : @politics –  micapam Feb 11 '13 at 3:02
2  
If you're defaulting to an array, use: def politics; @politics ||= []; end or << won't work until you assign a value to politics some other way. –  A Fader Darkly Jul 17 at 17:06
    
I think the after_initialize method suggested by Dave Newton is the best solution –  josal Sep 12 at 10:12
    
note that attr_accessor_with_default is deprecated. See the docs –  New Alexandria Sep 23 at 13:51
    
@NewAlexandria the answer already says that. –  Orlando Sep 23 at 17:34

This is not done in attr_accessor, rather, in your migration.

So .. you could perform a migration

(1) rails g migration ChangePoliticsColumnToDefaultValueFalse

(2) add this in def self.up

def self.up change_column :your_table, :politics, :boolean, :default => 0 end

The bottom line is that default attributes are set in migrations.

Hope this helps!

Edit:

There are some similar questions too that have been answered well:

Like here and here

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2  
Actually attr_accessor IS the correct method if you don't want your attribute stored in the database. –  Mark Murphy Apr 3 at 15:04
class Song < ActiveRecord::Base
    def initialize(*args)
    super(*args)
      return unless self.new_record?
      self.play_count ||= 0
    end
end

In my opinion, I think this answer is good. Although We are overriding the initialize method but since super is called on first line of this method, it didn't change anything to the base class initialize method, rather this is key feature of Object Oriented programming that we can override it, and add some more functionality at the time of initialization of obects. And Also the initializer will not be skipped while reading objects from database, since super is called at the first line of the function.

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2  
IMO after_initialize is a better option than overriding a framework-overridden method, and the Rails AR guide encourages its use. The issue is that AR might change from under you and change behavior. –  Dave Newton May 22 '13 at 15:43
    
Thanks Dave por your suggestion, I think is the best one! –  josal Sep 12 at 10:14

if it is a ActiveRecord instance, the boolean column is a right way. in other cases you can setup accessors in initialize() method

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Use before_create, never override initialize in an AR object! –  tesserakt Jun 6 '12 at 13:52
    
actually after_initialize will be better than before_create –  Orlando Apr 10 '13 at 15:08

If you define your attr_accessor, by default the value is nil. You can write to it, thereby making it !nil

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I've been using this form in ActiveRecord:

class Song < ActiveRecord::Base

    def initialize(*args)
      super(*args)
      return unless self.new_record?
      self.play_count ||= 0
    end
end
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You should not overwride initialize in ActiveRecord objects, use before_create instead. –  tesserakt Jun 6 '12 at 13:52
    
why not? The initializer is skipped only when reading objects from the database. For a default value, you wouldn't want it overwriting info from the db anyway. –  mcmoyer Jul 24 '12 at 18:54
    
@user1144360 Because as the Rails AR guide notes there's an after_initialize provided specifically to avoid the need to override initialize. IMO it's safer to do so over the long term. The issue is that AR might change from under you and change behavior. –  Dave Newton May 22 '13 at 15:45

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