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I am using an unmanaged dll in cpp which I call from from my C# web project. It works fine on my localhost but simply does not work on my shared hosting, winhost. It happens when I try to use one of the function in the dll.

The error message I am getting is:

"Unable to load DLL 'dllTest.dll': The application has failed to start because its side-by-side configuration is incorrect. Please see the application event log or use the command-line sxstrace.exe tool for more detail. (Exception from HRESULT: 0x800736B1)","errors":[{"name":"DllNotFoundException","message":"Unable to load DLL 'dllTest.dll': The application has failed to start because its side-by-side configuration is incorrect. Please see the application event log or use the command-line sxstrace.exe tool for more detail. (Exception from HRESULT: 0x800736B1)"}]}

I am suspecting that it is a path issue. The dll in question, dllTest.dll is placed in my bin folder. I am not sure where it is searching for the dll but is there a way I can specify a path for the search of the dll. I can't find a way to specify a relative path to the dll.

I do not think it is a dependency issue because my dllTest.dll is just a simple test and it only contains a simple add function.

Or could not be other causes?

Thanks for the help.

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Could it be an x86 vs x64 issue? Also, I'd run dependency walker on it and make sure the DLL wasn't missing one of its dependencies (though that's a total stab in the dark). –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Jul 16 '11 at 8:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted

The problem is that your C++ DLL requires the CRT libraries to be installed in order to work. The bolded part of the error message is what gives you the hint:

Unable to load DLL 'dllTest.dll': The application has failed to start because its side-by-side configuration is incorrect. Please see the application event log or use the command-line sxstrace.exe tool for more detail.

That explains why everything is fine on your development machine—-they're already installed there because they got installed with your development tools—and why it doesn't work on the production server, which doesn't have the CRT redistributables installed.

You need to download the appropriate redistributable package for the version of Visual Studio that you compiled the DLL with. For example, if you're using Visual Studio 2010, you can download version 10 of the CRT redistributable here.

Alternatively, you could compile the DLL with the runtime libraries statically linked. To do that, change your project properties to throw the /MT switch instead of /MD—(it's found in the UI under "Configuration Properties" -> "C/C++" -> "Code Generation" -> "Runtime Library").

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+1 Static linking is by a large distance the simplest solution to the problem –  David Heffernan Jul 16 '11 at 8:18
    
Thanks! I am using a shared hosting so I can't use the CRT distributable. I think statically linking them solved the problem. However, I have another problem. I have a dll, subspace.dll and it references a lot of other 3rd party dlls. Does it mean that I have to build all of them in /MT also? What can I do if I do not have access to the source of some of them. –  wayne Jul 16 '11 at 12:01
1  
If you are having multiple DLLs that depends on VC-Runtime, it is better to distribute VC-runtime. –  Ajay Jul 16 '11 at 12:18
    
@wayne: It's all going to depend on what dependencies those other DLLs have. But most of them are going to require some kind of C/C++ runtime library, either statically linked in or loaded on the machine. There aren't a whole lot of other options. Installing the CRT is the common path, weird that your hosting machine wouldn't have it already loaded. –  Cody Gray Jul 16 '11 at 12:19

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