Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need an example for compressing a string using GZip in android. I want to send a string like "hello" to the method and get the following zipped string:

BQAAAB+LCAAAAAAABADtvQdgHEmWJSYvbcp7f0r1StfgdKEIgGATJNiQQBDswYjN5pLsHWlHIymrKoHKZVZlXWYWQMztnbz33nvvvffee++997o7nU4n99//P1xmZAFs9s5K2smeIYCqyB8/fnwfPyLmeVlW/w+GphA2BQAAAA==

Then I need to decompress it. Can anybody give me an example and complete the following methods?

private String compressString(String input) {
    //...
}

private String decompressString(String input) {
    //...
}

Thanks,


update

According to scessor's answer, Now I have the following 4 methods. Android and .net compress and decompress methods. These methods are compatible with each other except in one case. I mean they are compatible in the first 3 states but incompatible in the 4th state:

  • state 1) Android.compress <-> Android.decompress: (OK)
  • state 2) Net.compress <-> Net.decompress: (OK)
  • state 3) Net.compress -> Android.decompress: (OK)
  • state 4) Android.compress -> .Net.decompress: (NOT OK)

can anybody solve it?

Android methods:

public static String compress(String str) throws IOException {

    byte[] blockcopy = ByteBuffer
            .allocate(4)
            .order(java.nio.ByteOrder.LITTLE_ENDIAN)
            .putInt(str.length())
            .array();
    ByteArrayOutputStream os = new ByteArrayOutputStream(str.length());
    GZIPOutputStream gos = new GZIPOutputStream(os);
    gos.write(str.getBytes());
    gos.close();
    os.close();
    byte[] compressed = new byte[4 + os.toByteArray().length];
    System.arraycopy(blockcopy, 0, compressed, 0, 4);
    System.arraycopy(os.toByteArray(), 0, compressed, 4,
            os.toByteArray().length);
    return Base64.encode(compressed);

}

public static String decompress(String zipText) throws IOException {
    byte[] compressed = Base64.decode(zipText);
    if (compressed.length > 4)
    {
        GZIPInputStream gzipInputStream = new GZIPInputStream(
                new ByteArrayInputStream(compressed, 4,
                        compressed.length - 4));

        ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
        for (int value = 0; value != -1;) {
            value = gzipInputStream.read();
            if (value != -1) {
                baos.write(value);
            }
        }
        gzipInputStream.close();
        baos.close();
        String sReturn = new String(baos.toByteArray(), "UTF-8");
        return sReturn;
    }
    else
    {
        return "";
    }
}

.Net methods:

public static string compress(string text)
{
    byte[] buffer = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(text);
    MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream();
    using (GZipStream zip = new GZipStream(ms, CompressionMode.Compress, true))
    {
        zip.Write(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
    }

    ms.Position = 0;
    MemoryStream outStream = new MemoryStream();

    byte[] compressed = new byte[ms.Length];
    ms.Read(compressed, 0, compressed.Length);

    byte[] gzBuffer = new byte[compressed.Length + 4];
    System.Buffer.BlockCopy(compressed, 0, gzBuffer, 4, compressed.Length);
    System.Buffer.BlockCopy(BitConverter.GetBytes(buffer.Length), 0, gzBuffer, 0, 4);
    return Convert.ToBase64String(gzBuffer);
}

public static string decompress(string compressedText)
{
    byte[] gzBuffer = Convert.FromBase64String(compressedText);
    using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream())
    {
        int msgLength = BitConverter.ToInt32(gzBuffer, 0);
        ms.Write(gzBuffer, 4, gzBuffer.Length - 4);

        byte[] buffer = new byte[msgLength];

        ms.Position = 0;
        using (GZipStream zip = new GZipStream(ms, CompressionMode.Decompress))
        {
            zip.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
        }

        return Encoding.UTF8.GetString(buffer);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Result of compressString cannot be String, it must be bytes[]. Likewise, input for decompressString cannot be String, it must be bytes[] too. –  JBM Jul 16 '11 at 12:33
    
What do mean 'vice versa'? Compress a GZIPOutputStream using a String? ;-) –  EJP Apr 2 '12 at 1:31
    
I mean decompress –  breceivemail Apr 2 '12 at 10:42
    
My .Net method create the mentioned large string that is not same as the result of compress method in Android. I Updated my question and inserted the .Net Compress and Decompress methods. can anybody change those methods to create same compress strings? –  breceivemail Apr 2 '12 at 10:45
    
There are many possible, valid "compressed" strings which will decompress to the string "Hello". If two different compressors produce different outputs, that is okay, as long as they decompress correctly on all outputs. What output are you getting from the decompressor for the NOT OK situation? –  Stobor Apr 14 '12 at 18:04
show 2 more comments

5 Answers 5

up vote 38 down vote accepted

The GZIP methods:

public static byte[] compress(String string) throws IOException {
    ByteArrayOutputStream os = new ByteArrayOutputStream(string.length());
    GZIPOutputStream gos = new GZIPOutputStream(os);
    gos.write(string.getBytes());
    gos.close();
    byte[] compressed = os.toByteArray();
    os.close();
    return compressed;
}

public static String decompress(byte[] compressed) throws IOException {
    final int BUFFER_SIZE = 32;
    ByteArrayInputStream is = new ByteArrayInputStream(compressed);
    GZIPInputStream gis = new GZIPInputStream(is, BUFFER_SIZE);
    StringBuilder string = new StringBuilder();
    byte[] data = new byte[BUFFER_SIZE];
    int bytesRead;
    while ((bytesRead = gis.read(data)) != -1) {
        string.append(new String(data, 0, bytesRead));
    }
    gis.close();
    is.close();
    return string.toString();
}

And a test:

final String text = "hello";
try {
    byte[] compressed = compress(text);
    for (byte character : compressed) {
        Log.d("test", String.valueOf(character));
    }
    String decompressed = decompress(compressed);
    Log.d("test", decompressed);
} catch (IOException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

=== Update ===

If you need .Net compability my code has to be changed a little:

public static byte[] compress(String string) throws IOException {
    byte[] blockcopy = ByteBuffer
        .allocate(4)
        .order(java.nio.ByteOrder.LITTLE_ENDIAN)
        .putInt(string.length())
        .array();
    ByteArrayOutputStream os = new ByteArrayOutputStream(string.length());
    GZIPOutputStream gos = new GZIPOutputStream(os);
    gos.write(string.getBytes());
    gos.close();
    os.close();
    byte[] compressed = new byte[4 + os.toByteArray().length];
    System.arraycopy(blockcopy, 0, compressed, 0, 4);
    System.arraycopy(os.toByteArray(), 0, compressed, 4, os.toByteArray().length);
    return compressed;
}

public static String decompress(byte[] compressed) throws IOException {
    final int BUFFER_SIZE = 32;
    ByteArrayInputStream is = new ByteArrayInputStream(compressed, 4, compressed.length - 4);
    GZIPInputStream gis = new GZIPInputStream(is, BUFFER_SIZE);
    StringBuilder string = new StringBuilder();
    byte[] data = new byte[BUFFER_SIZE];
    int bytesRead;
    while ((bytesRead = gis.read(data)) != -1) {
        string.append(new String(data, 0, bytesRead));
    }
    gis.close();
    is.close();
    return string.toString();
}

You can use the same test script.

share|improve this answer
1  
Man, I take my hat off for you! Very few people on this site have idea of unit tests and why doing it! Well-deserved +1! –  JBM Jul 16 '11 at 21:34
    
Thanks for your answer. I tested your solution but I did not get the string: "BQAAAB+LCAAAAAAABADtvQdgHEmWJSYvbcp7f0r1StfgdKEIgGATJNiQQBDswYjN5pLsHWlHIymrKoH‌​KZVZlXWYWQMztnbz33nvvvffee++997o7nU4n99//P1xmZAFs9s5K2smeIYCqyB8/fnwfPyLmeVlW/w+G‌​phA2BQAAAA==" The result of your method was not same as it. The mentioned string is generated by gzip algorithm in .Net for word "hello". I need to generate this string. How can I do that? –  breceivemail Mar 27 '12 at 9:17
    
I found Decompress method and it works correctly. But the Compress method does not work correctly. –  breceivemail Mar 27 '12 at 9:17
    
public static String Decompress(String zipText) throws IOException { int size = 0; byte[] gzipBuff = Base64.decode(zipText); ByteArrayInputStream memstream = new ByteArrayInputStream(gzipBuff, 4,gzipBuff.length - 4); GZIPInputStream gzin = new GZIPInputStream(memstream); final int buffSize = 8192; byte[] tempBuffer = new byte[buffSize]; ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream(); while ((size = gzin.read(tempBuffer, 0, buffSize)) != -1) { baos.write(tempBuffer, 0, size); } byte[] buffer = baos.toByteArray(); baos.close(); return new String(buffer, "UTF-8"); } –  breceivemail Mar 27 '12 at 9:21
    
public static String Compress(String text) throws IOException { byte[] gzipBuff = EncodingUtils.getBytes(text, "UTF-8"); ByteArrayOutputStream bs = new ByteArrayOutputStream(); GZIPOutputStream gzin = new GZIPOutputStream(bs); gzin.write(gzipBuff); gzin.finish(); bs.close(); byte[] buffer = bs.toByteArray(); gzin.close(); return Base64.encode(buffer); } –  breceivemail Mar 27 '12 at 9:22
show 12 more comments

Whatever it was that compressed "Hello" to BQAAAB+LC... is a particularly poor implementation of a gzipper. It expanded "Hello" far, far more than necessary, using a dynamic block instead of a static block in the deflate format. After removing the four-byte prefix to the gzip stream (which always starts with hex 1f 8b), "Hello" was expanded to 123 bytes. In the world of compression, that is considered a crime.

The Compress method that you are complaining about is working correctly and properly. It is generating a static block and a total output of 25 bytes. The gzip format has a ten-byte header and eight-byte trailer overhead, leaving the five-byte input having been coded in seven bytes. That's more like it.

Streams that are not compressible will be expanded, but it shouldn't be by much. The deflate format used by gzip will add five bytes to every 16K to 64K for incompressible data.

To get actual compression, in general you need to give the compressor much more to work with that five bytes, so that it can find repeated strings and biased statistics in compressible data. I understand that you were just doing tests with a short string. But in an actual application, you would never use a general-purpose compressor with such short strings, since it would always be better to just send the string.

share|improve this answer
add comment

In your Decompress() method, the first 4 bytes of the Base64 decoded input are skipped before passing to GZipInputStream. These bytes are found to be 05 00 00 00 in this particular case. So in the Compress() method, these bytes have to be put back in just before the Base64 encode.

If I do this, Compress() returns the following:

BQAAAB+LCAAAAAAAAADLSM3JyQcAhqYQNgUAAAA=

I know that this is not exactly the same as your expectation, which is:

BQAAAB+LCAAAAAAABADtvQdgHEmWJSYvbcp7f0r1StfgdKEIgGATJNiQQBDswYjN5pLsHWlHIymrKoHKZVZlXWYWQMztnbz33nvvvffee++997o7nU4n99//P1xmZAFs9s5K2smeIYCqyB8/fnwfPyLmeVlW/w+GphA2BQAAAA==

But, if my result is plugged back into Decompress(), I think you'll still get "Hello". Try it. The difference may be due to the different compression level with which you got the original string.

So what are the mysterious prefixed bytes 05 00 00 00? According to this answer it may be the length of the compressed string so that the program knows how long the decompressed byte buffer should be. Still that does not tally in this case.

This is the modified code for compress():

public static String Compress(String text) throws IOException {
    ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream();

    // TODO: Should be computed instead of being hard-coded
    baos.write(new byte[]{0x05, 0, 0, 0}, 0, 4);

    GZIPOutputStream gzos = new GZIPOutputStream(baos);
    gzos.write(text.getBytes());
    gzos.close();

    return Base64.encode(baos.toByteArray());
}

Update:

The reason why the output strings in Android and your .NET code don't match is that the .NET GZip implementation does a faster compression (and thus larger output). This can be verified for sure by looking at the raw Base64 decoded byte values:

.NET:

1F8B 0800 0000 0000 0400 EDBD 0760 1C49
9625 262F 6DCA 7B7F 4AF5 4AD7 E074 A108
8060 1324 D890 4010 ECC1 88CD E692 EC1D
6947 2329 AB2A 81CA 6556 655D 6616 40CC
ED9D BCF7 DE7B EFBD F7DE 7BEF BDF7 BA3B
9D4E 27F7 DFFF 3F5C 6664 016C F6CE 4ADA
C99E 2180 AAC8 1F3F 7E7C 1F3F 22E6 7959
56FF 0F86 A610 3605 0000 00

My Android version:

1F8B 0800 0000 0000 0000 CB48 CDC9 C907
0086 A610 3605 0000 00

Now if we check the GZip File Format, we see that both the .NET and Android versions are mostly identical in the initial header and trailing CRC32 & Size fields. The only differences are in the below fields:

  • XFL = 04 (compressor used fastest algorithm) in the case of .NET, whereas it's 00 in Android
  • The actual compressed blocks

So it's clear from the XFL field that the .NET compression algorithm produces longer output.

Infact, when I creates a binary file with these raw data values and then uncompressed them using gunzip, both the .NET and Android versions gave exactly the same output as "hello".

So you don't have to bother about the differing results.

share|improve this answer
    
@breceivemail Check the update to my answer. –  Dheeraj V.S. Mar 31 '12 at 19:51
1  
It's not faster to generate more output. It's slower. It takes the same time to find matching strings before the static vs. dynamic decision is made. It takes almost no time to predict the size of the output for static vs. dynamic and then make the correct decision in this case (static). Then it takes much less time to generate a much shorter output for static in this particular case. The trade here was not a faster compressor but rather a shorter development time (or a lazy developer) to not write a complete deflator. –  Mark Adler Apr 2 '12 at 15:14
    
@MarkAdler You might be right, but the point I was making was that the two methods were giving differing results because they their compressing schemes are different. The OP was concerned about why the result differed. –  Dheeraj V.S. Apr 2 '12 at 15:50
add comment

I tried your code in my project, and found a encoding bug in compress method on Android:

byte[] blockcopy = ByteBuffer
        .allocate(4)
        .order(java.nio.ByteOrder.LITTLE_ENDIAN)
        .putInt(str.length())
        .array();
ByteArrayOutputStream os = new ByteArrayOutputStream(str.length());
GZIPOutputStream gos = new GZIPOutputStream(os);
gos.write(str.getBytes());

on above code, u should use the corrected encoding, and fill the bytes length, not the string length:

byte[] data = str.getBytes("UTF-8");

byte[] blockcopy = ByteBuffer
        .allocate(4)
        .order(java.nio.ByteOrder.LITTLE_ENDIAN)
        .putInt(data.length)
            .array();

ByteArrayOutputStream os = new ByteArrayOutputStream( data.length );    
GZIPOutputStream gos = new GZIPOutputStream(os);
gos.write( data );
share|improve this answer
add comment

I got crazy with this issue. At the end, in my case (.Net 4) it was not necessary to add this extra 4 bytes at the begining for the .Net compatibility.

It works simply like this:

Android Compress:

public static byte[] compress(String string) throws IOException {
    ByteArrayOutputStream os = new ByteArrayOutputStream(string.length());
    GZIPOutputStream gos = new GZIPOutputStream(os);
    gos.write(string.getBytes());
    gos.close();
    byte[] compressed = os.toByteArray();
    os.close();
    return compressed;
}

.Net Decompress

public static byte[] DecompressViD(byte[] gzip)
    {
        // Create a GZIP stream with decompression mode.
        // ... Then create a buffer and write into while reading from the GZIP stream.
        using (GZipStream stream = new GZipStream(new MemoryStream(gzip), CompressionMode.Decompress))
        {
            const int size = 4096;
            byte[] buffer = new byte[size];
            using (MemoryStream memory = new MemoryStream())
            {
                int count = 0;
                do
                {
                    count = stream.Read(buffer, 0, size);
                    if (count > 0)
                    {
                        memory.Write(buffer, 0, count);
                    }
                }
                while (count > 0);
                return memory.ToArray();
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.