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I have an abstract class with a protected variable

abstract class Beverage
{
        protected string description;

}

I can't access it from a subclass. Intellisense doesn't show it accessible. Why is that so?

class Espresso:Beverage
{
    //this.description ??
}
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1  
and what is the error message? could you please post the line which fails? as it is now commented out, it won't compile just because it's not inside any method. –  Vlad Jul 16 '11 at 13:00
    
There is no error message. It's just not accessible inside class. As answers suggest it's accessible inside methods. –  Ufuk Hacıoğulları Jul 16 '11 at 13:04
    
Well, actually, nothing is accessible outside methods. If would fail exactly the same way if it would be public instead of protected. –  Vlad Jul 16 '11 at 13:14
    
Thanks Vlad. I'll keep that in mind. –  Ufuk Hacıoğulları Jul 16 '11 at 13:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Long answer: description is a special type of variable called a "field". You may wish to read up on fields on MSDN.

Short answer: You must access the protected field in a constructor, method, property, etc. of the subclass.

class Subclass
{
    // These are field declarations. You can't say things like 'this.description = "foobar";' here.
    string foo;

    // Here is a method. You can access the protected field inside this method.
    private void DoSomething()
    {
        string bar = description;
    }
}

Slightly more detailed answer:

Inside a class declaration, you declare the members of the class. These may be fields, properties, methods, etc. This is not code that is executed. Unlike code inside a method, it simply tells the compiler what the members of the class are.

Inside certain class members, such as constructors, methods, and properties, is where you put your imperative code. Here is an example:

class Foo
{
    // Declaring fields. These just define the members of the class.
    string foo;
    int bar;

    // Declaring methods. The method declarations just define the members of the class, and the code inside them is only executed when the method is called.
    private void DoSomething()
    {
        // When you call DoSomething(), this code is executed.
    }
}
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It works. Thanks. Would you care to explain this behaviour? –  Ufuk Hacıoğulları Jul 16 '11 at 13:06
    
@Ufuk: See my edits to my original answer. You must understand the difference between class members code that is executed when a method is called--this is a very important concept in object-oriented programming! –  Matthew Jul 16 '11 at 13:12

You can access it from within a method. Try this:

class Espresso : Beverage
{
    public void Test()
    {
        this.description = "sd";
    }
}
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Abstract has nothing to do with this. –  Steven Jul 16 '11 at 12:59
1  
@Steven: and protected, too. :-) –  Vlad Jul 16 '11 at 13:17

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