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I have never got my head around using regular expressions, so I have a bit of an issue understanding why my below listed regex. doesn't only allow the below listed characters:

  • A-Z & a-z (upper & lower)
  • ÅÄÖ & åäö
  • 0-9 & _ (underscore)

Here's the regex:

/^[\s\da-0-9-zA-ZåäöÅÄÖ_]$/i

What am I doing wrong?

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\d and 0-9 are redundant. –  Felix Kling Jul 16 '11 at 13:20

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Because this a-0-9-z is in reverse order. Use this: ^[\s\da-zA-ZåäöÅÄÖ_]$ or this: (?i)^[\s\da-zåäö_]$ with ignore case option set to enabled.

Also you can use special character \w, which means: letters, digits, and underscores

In you regex you're using \d and 0-9. \d includes 0-9, see Explanation

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Hi! That still lets through special chars like @ & &... –  Industrial Jul 16 '11 at 13:17
    
@Industrial, What do you mean? –  Kirill Polishchuk Jul 16 '11 at 13:21
    
Running the regexp you provided (^[\s\da-zA-ZåäöÅÄÖ_]$) with a string containing & or & doesn't filter & or & out as I need –  Industrial Jul 16 '11 at 13:25
    
@Industrial, this ^[\s\da-zA-ZåäöÅÄÖ_]$ will match only string which have length of 1 character. If your string is @ or &, this regex shouldn't match. But if your string is whitespace, digit, a-zA-ZåäöÅÄÖ or _, it will match. –  Kirill Polishchuk Jul 16 '11 at 13:31
1  
@Industrial, If input string is a it will match, if input is aa it won't match. If you need to match string, which contains only these chars, you need to set + (one or more repetitions), i.e.: ^[\s\da-zA-ZåäöÅÄÖ_]+$ –  Kirill Polishchuk Jul 16 '11 at 13:35

Is the expression here a verbatim copy? Because in

/^[\s\da-0-9-zA-ZåäöÅÄÖ_]$/i 

you have

a-0-9-zA-Z

where you probably mean

0-9a-zA-Z
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the mistake is a-0-9-z which should be a-z0-9

furthermore, you can lose the 0-9 cause you used \d, and you can use \w for any "word" character.

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This regex will match a signle character string and case insensitive in the following : any space character, any digit (0-9), any letter (a-ZA-Z), and one of åäöÅÄÖ_ .

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Dunno about the latin, but you don't need 0-9 if you use \d, also, you don't need a-zA-Z if you use the /i flag, that makes everything case insensitive so you could leave just a-z.

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