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I have two list of Medecine Objects:

List<Medecine> list1;
List<Medecine> list2;

MedecineID, MedecineName etc are properties of Medecine; `MedecineID is unique.

I want a list objects that are in list1 but not in list2;

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3 Answers 3

The natural way to do this in LINQ is by using the Enumerable.Except method:

var results = list1.Except(list2).ToList();

However, for this to work you have to tell LINQ when two objects are "the same". You can do this by having Medecine implement IEquatable<Medecine> like this:

class Medecine : IEquatable<Medecine>
{
    public int MedecineID { get; set; }
    public string MedecineName { get; set; }

    public override int GetHashCode() {
         return this.MedecineID;
    }

    public bool Equals(Medecine other)
    {
        if (ReferenceEquals(null, other)) {
            return false;
        }
        if (ReferenceEquals(this, other)) {
            return true;
        }
        return other.MedecineID == this.MedecineID;
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        if (ReferenceEquals(null, obj)) {
            return false;
        }
        if (ReferenceEquals(this, obj)) {
            return true;
        }
        if (obj.GetType() != typeof(Medecine)) {
            return false;
        }
        return Equals((Medecine)obj);
    }
}

If this approach is not suitable, you can make an IEqualityComparer<Medecine> and pass that to Except as an additional parameter:

class MyComparer : IEqualityComparer<Medecine>
{
    public bool Equals(Medecine x, Medecine y)
    {
        if (x == null && y == null) {
            return true;
        }

        if (x == null || y == null) {
            return false;
        }

        return x.MedecineID == y.MedecineID;
    }

    public int GetHashCode(Medecine obj)
    {
        return obj.MedecineID;
    }
}

var results = list1.Except(list2, new MyComparer()).ToList();
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If you want to avoid writing a custom comparison object for your medicine class, then you could just project the "MedecineId" out of the second list into a new collection, then use IEnumerable.Contains() to create your "desired" list:

class Medecine
{
    public Guid MedecineId { get; set; }
    public String Name { get; set; }
    // whatever other fields
}

Create some test data:

List<Guid> mIds = 
    new List<Guid>( Enumerable.Range( 0, 20 ).Select( n => Guid.NewGuid() ) );

List<Medecine> m1 = new List<Medecine>
(
    Enumerable.Range( 0, 10 ).Select( c => new Medecine() { MedecineId = mIds.ElementAt( c ), Name = c.ToString() } )
);

List<Medecine> m2 = new List<Medecine>
(
    Enumerable.Range( 5, 15 ).Select( d => new Medecine() { MedecineId = mIds.ElementAt( d ), Name = d.ToString() } )
);

Then getting your results is simply:

var excludedIds = m2.Select( m2s => m2s.MedecineId).Distinct();
var results = m1.Where( m1s => !excludedIds.Contains( m1s.MedecineId ));
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var query = list1.Except(list2);
var list1NotList2 = query.ToList();

This will give you all the items that are in list1 but not list2.

Note that you would need to ensure that your Medecine objects can be compared for equality properly (usually via Equals/GetHashCode). You can also pass in a custom IEqualityComparer as the final argument to Except.

See here for more information on Except.

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