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Virtually all the books I looked at so far related to this topic are designed for computer science students in a class room. I am looking for a book that is authored by professional working software engineer and its for working programmers. Do you know such as book?

Especially I am looking for something that also introduces related math such as statistic or algebra and makes good use of Object Oriendted concepts.

If no such book then I am looking for online PDF documents related to the topic of this question. It would be ideal if it uses scala but if not then Java 5 or 6 is ok.

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closed as off topic by Greg Mattes, Kim Stebel, Bart Kiers, Jean-Philippe Pellet, dmckee Jul 18 '11 at 2:10

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Check this out. I'm sure you'll find something you like. –  agilesteel Jul 16 '11 at 18:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try "Algorithms in a Nutshell". It is full of real code in Java and is less theoretical than something like CLRS.

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Now I blame thee to make me want to buy that book. –  Marcelo Jul 16 '11 at 14:49

I am looking for a book that is authored by professional working software engineer and its for working programmers.

As a professional working software engineer, I can assure you that a good software engineer can (and needs to) understand anything in a typical CS text book on algorithms.

Especially I am looking for something that also introduces related math such as statistic or algebra

That sounds like stuff you would find in high school maths text books.

... and makes good use of Object Oriented concepts.

OO is actually not particularly relevant to the study of data structures. IMO, too much focus on OO will probably get in the way of understanding how the data structures work under the hood.

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Rather than asking your algorithms book to teach you mathematics, you should have a second book on mathematics which you use to learn anything that you don't know well enough from the algorithms book. There exist some compendiums like "The VNR Concise Encyclopedia of Mathematics" that are fairly good references (though you may have to backtrack through the book to pick up the required pieces that you don't know yet).

As a working professional, you should seek to gather several resources and take from each what you need to gain a deeper understanding of the areas in which you are lacking. You certainly don't have time to do homework exercises on string searching algorithms when you are faced with a graph matching problem, but then no-one is making you read the entire CS textbook or do all the homework. Many algorithm books (including Sedgewick and CLRS ("Introduction to Algorithms")) are written so that you don't have to read them in order. So don't read them in order unless that tells you exactly what you need to know.

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