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If I have some integer n, and I want to know the position of the most significant bit (that is, if the least significant bit is on the right, I want to know the position of the furthest left bit that is a 1), what is the quickest/most efficient method of finding out?

I know that POSIX supports a ffs() method in strings.h to find the first set bit, but there doesn't seem to be a corresponding fls() method.

Is there some really obvious way of doing this that I'm missing?

What about in cases where you can't use POSIX functions for portability?

Edit: What about a solution that works on both 32 and 64 bit architectures (many of the code listings seem like they'd only work on 32 bit ints).

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do you specifically want the bit number 'n', or would 2 ^ n suffice? –  Alnitak Mar 22 '09 at 23:51
    
Either would work. –  Zxaos Mar 23 '09 at 1:23
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18 Answers 18

up vote 26 down vote accepted

See "Number of leading zeros algorithms" in Hacker's Delight.

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6  
Hacker's Delight and Anderson's bit twiddling hacks page are definitely the place to go for these kinds of questions. –  Michael Burr Mar 23 '09 at 0:48
    
This is a partial solution but (1) the number of leading zeroes is different for 32-bit and 64-bit values, (2) most of these algorithms don't even work for 64-bit values, and (3) finding the actual bit position from this is an prime place for off-by-one errors. Why not just find the MSB directly by calculating the integer log base 2? (See my answer for details.) –  Quinn Taylor Feb 14 '11 at 17:42
    
@QuinnTaylor A good 32-bit algorithm for NLZ gives rise to a reasonably good 64-bit algorithm: letting n = (high << 32) + low, just do if (high == 0) 32 + nlz(low) else nlz(high). –  Derrick Coetzee Jan 3 '12 at 8:32
    
The link is dead :( –  ing0 Feb 13 '13 at 9:48
2  
Link only answer ... –  Kay Apr 4 at 19:38
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Assuming you're on x86 and game for a bit of inline assembler, Intel provides a BSR instruction ("bit scan reverse"). It's fast on some x86s (microcoded on others). From the manual:

Searches the source operand for the most significant set bit (1 bit). If a most significant 1 bit is found, its bit index is stored in the destination operand. The source operand can be a register or a memory location; the destination operand is a register. The bit index is an unsigned offset from bit 0 of the source operand. If the content source operand is 0, the content of the destination operand is undefined.

(If you're on PowerPC there's a similar cntlz ("count leading zeros") instruction.)

Example code for gcc:

#include <iostream>

int main (int,char**)
{
  int n=1;
  for (;;++n) {
    int msb;
    asm("bsrl %1,%0" : "=r"(msb) : "r"(n));
    std::cout << n << " : " << msb << std::endl;
  }
  return 0;
}

See also this inline assembler tutorial, which shows (section 9.4) it being considerably faster than looping code.

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3  
Actually this instruction is usually microcoded into a loop and is rather slow. –  rlbond Mar 23 '09 at 3:10
1  
Which one ? BSR or CNTLZ ? As I read the x86-timing.pdf referenced above, BSR is only slow on the Netburst Pentiums. I know nothing about PowerPC though. –  timday Mar 23 '09 at 9:26
2  
...OK, on closer inspection make that "BSR is only fast on P3/Pentium-M/Core2 x86s". Slow on Netburst and AMD. –  timday Mar 23 '09 at 9:29
    
cntlzw is a pipelined (not microcoded) op on most PPCs. Looks like it's about as fast as an add on Xenon. –  Crashworks Mar 23 '09 at 19:28
    
@timday: also slow on (some?) Atom µarches. –  Stephen Canon May 6 '13 at 20:02
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GCC has:

 -- Built-in Function: int __builtin_clz (unsigned int x)
     Returns the number of leading 0-bits in X, starting at the most
     significant bit position.  If X is 0, the result is undefined.

 -- Built-in Function: int __builtin_clzl (unsigned long)
     Similar to `__builtin_clz', except the argument type is `unsigned
     long'.

 -- Built-in Function: int __builtin_clzll (unsigned long long)
     Similar to `__builtin_clz', except the argument type is `unsigned
     long long'.

I'd expect them to be translated into something reasonably efficient for your current platform, whether it be one of those fancy bit-twiddling algorithms, or a single instruction.

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Since 2^N is an integer with only the Nth bit set (1 << N), finding the position (N) of the highest set bit is the integer log base 2 of that integer.

http://graphics.stanford.edu/~seander/bithacks.html#IntegerLogObvious

unsigned int v;
unsigned r = 0;

while (v >>= 1) {
    r++;
}

This "obvious" algorithm may not be transparent to everyone, but when you realize that the code shifts right by one bit repeatedly until the leftmost bit has been shifted off (note that C treats any non-zero value as true) and returns the number of shifts, it makes perfect sense. It also means that it works even when more than one bit is set — the result is always for the most significant bit.

If you scroll down on that page, there are faster, more complex variations. However, if you know you're dealing with numbers with a lot of leading zeroes, the naive approach may provide acceptable speed, since bit shifting is rather fast in C, and the simple algorithm doesn't require indexing an array.

NOTE: When using 64-bit values, be extremely cautious about using extra-clever algorithms; many of them only work correctly for 32-bit values.

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It seems to work, but I do not fully understand why we don't shift out bits forever and get stuck in the while loop. –  Johan Sep 20 '11 at 9:43
2  
@Johan Stepping through with a debugger can help explain why the loop exits. Basically, its' because the expression in the condition evaluates to 0 (which is treated as false) once the last 1 bit has been shifted off the right. –  Quinn Taylor Sep 21 '11 at 19:31
1  
Nice idea to use the end result like that :) –  Johan Sep 22 '11 at 6:27
2  
note: must be unsigned, for signed integers the right shift fails for negative numbers. –  Xantix Sep 3 '12 at 5:56
    
Xantix: The shift in C/C++ is a logical shift, so it works fine. For Java, JavaScript, or D, you need to use the logical shift operator >>>. Plus probably the comparator != 0, and some unspecified number of parenthesis. –  Chase Jan 3 at 20:31
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This is sort of like finding a kind of integer log. There are bit-twiddling tricks, but I've made my own tool for this. The goal of course is for speed.

My realization is that the CPU has an automatic bit-detector already, used for integer to float conversion! So use that.

double ff=(double)(v|1);
return ((*(1+(unsigned long *)&ff))>>20)-1023;  // assumes x86 endianness

This version casts the value to a double, then reads off the exponent, which tells you where the bit was. The fancy shift and subtract is to extract the proper parts from the IEEE value.

It's slightly faster to use floats, but a float can only give you the first 24 bit positions because of its smaller precision.

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Won't that cause a load hit store on moving between register sets? –  Crashworks Mar 23 '09 at 0:43
    
Isn't there a cost to loading/reading the FPU (as well as synchronizing with it)? –  Michael Burr Mar 23 '09 at 0:47
1  
Yes. And gcc will do nasty things with code like this with -O2 due to type-aliasing optimizations. –  MSN Mar 23 '09 at 0:51
1  
casting between integer and floating point can be surprisingly expensive on x86 CPU's –  jalf Mar 23 '09 at 1:23
2  
Hacker's Delight explains how to correct for the error in 32-bit floats in 5-3 Counting Leading 0's. Here's their code, which uses an anonymous union to overlap asFloat and asInt: k = k & ~(k >> 1); asFloat = (float)k + 0.5f; n = 158 - (asInt >> 23); (and yes, this relies on implementation-defined behavior) –  Derrick Coetzee Jan 3 '12 at 8:35
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This should be lightning fast:

int msb(unsigned int v) {
  static const int pos[32] = {0, 1, 28, 2, 29, 14, 24, 3,
    30, 22, 20, 15, 25, 17, 4, 8, 31, 27, 13, 23, 21, 19,
    16, 7, 26, 12, 18, 6, 11, 5, 10, 9};
  v |= v >> 1;
  v |= v >> 2;
  v |= v >> 4;
  v |= v >> 8;
  v |= v >> 16;
  v = (v >> 1) + 1;
  return pos[(v * 0x077CB531UL) >> 27];
}
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3  
7 bit shifts, 5 or instructions, a multiplty and a potential cache miss. :) Did you benchmark it, or look at the assembler generated? It could end up quite slow, depending on how much of it the compiler can eliminate. –  jalf Mar 23 '09 at 1:30
    
Hi, just wondering jalf, how do you now the thing with the possible cache miss? –  Eduardo Mar 23 '09 at 19:33
1  
I'm new here. I don't get the negative votes guys. I have provided the only answer with source code that actually works. –  Protagonist Mar 23 '09 at 19:59
4  
The "possible cache miss" is probably due to this code requiring access to its lookup table. If that table is not cached when this is called, there will be a stall while it's fetched. This might make the worst-case performance far worse than the solutions not using a LUT. –  unwind Mar 24 '09 at 15:00
5  
not really the point. It uses a lot more data cache than necessary (more than one cache line, even), and more instruction cache than necessary. You'll likely get cache misses that could have been avoided the first time you call the function, and it will pollute the cache more than necessary, so after the call, other code might encounter more misses than necessary. LUT's often aren't worth the trouble because cache misses are expensive. But I only said it was something I'd want to benchmark before I claimed it was "lightning fast". Not that it is definitely a problem. –  jalf Jul 8 '11 at 7:46
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Kaz Kylheku here

I benchmarked two approaches for this over 63 bit numbers (the long long type on gcc x86_64), staying away from the sign bit.

(I happen to need this "find highest bit" for something, you see.)

I implemented the data-driven binary search (closely based on one of the above answers). I also implemented a completely unrolled decision tree by hand, which is just code with immediate operands. No loops, no tables.

The decision tree (highest_bit_unrolled) benchmarked to be 69% faster, except for the n = 0 case for which the binary search has an explicit test.

The binary-search's special test for 0 case is only 48% faster than the decision tree, which does not have a special test.

Compiler, machine: (GCC 4.5.2, -O3, x86-64, 2867 Mhz Intel Core i5).

int highest_bit_unrolled(long long n)
{
  if (n & 0x7FFFFFFF00000000) {
    if (n & 0x7FFF000000000000) {
      if (n & 0x7F00000000000000) {
        if (n & 0x7000000000000000) {
          if (n & 0x4000000000000000)
            return 63;
          else
            return (n & 0x2000000000000000) ? 62 : 61;
        } else {
          if (n & 0x0C00000000000000)
            return (n & 0x0800000000000000) ? 60 : 59;
          else
            return (n & 0x0200000000000000) ? 58 : 57;
        }
      } else {
        if (n & 0x00F0000000000000) {
          if (n & 0x00C0000000000000)
            return (n & 0x0080000000000000) ? 56 : 55;
          else
            return (n & 0x0020000000000000) ? 54 : 53;
        } else {
          if (n & 0x000C000000000000)
            return (n & 0x0008000000000000) ? 52 : 51;
          else
            return (n & 0x0002000000000000) ? 50 : 49;
        }
      }
    } else {
      if (n & 0x0000FF0000000000) {
        if (n & 0x0000F00000000000) {
          if (n & 0x0000C00000000000)
            return (n & 0x0000800000000000) ? 48 : 47;
          else
            return (n & 0x0000200000000000) ? 46 : 45;
        } else {
          if (n & 0x00000C0000000000)
            return (n & 0x0000080000000000) ? 44 : 43;
          else
            return (n & 0x0000020000000000) ? 42 : 41;
        }
      } else {
        if (n & 0x000000F000000000) {
          if (n & 0x000000C000000000)
            return (n & 0x0000008000000000) ? 40 : 39;
          else
            return (n & 0x0000002000000000) ? 38 : 37;
        } else {
          if (n & 0x0000000C00000000)
            return (n & 0x0000000800000000) ? 36 : 35;
          else
            return (n & 0x0000000200000000) ? 34 : 33;
        }
      }
    }
  } else {
    if (n & 0x00000000FFFF0000) {
      if (n & 0x00000000FF000000) {
        if (n & 0x00000000F0000000) {
          if (n & 0x00000000C0000000)
            return (n & 0x0000000080000000) ? 32 : 31;
          else
            return (n & 0x0000000020000000) ? 30 : 29;
        } else {
          if (n & 0x000000000C000000)
            return (n & 0x0000000008000000) ? 28 : 27;
          else
            return (n & 0x0000000002000000) ? 26 : 25;
        }
      } else {
        if (n & 0x0000000000F00000) {
          if (n & 0x0000000000C00000)
            return (n & 0x0000000000800000) ? 24 : 23;
          else
            return (n & 0x0000000000200000) ? 22 : 21;
        } else {
          if (n & 0x00000000000C0000)
            return (n & 0x0000000000080000) ? 20 : 19;
          else
            return (n & 0x0000000000020000) ? 18 : 17;
        }
      }
    } else {
      if (n & 0x000000000000FF00) {
        if (n & 0x000000000000F000) {
          if (n & 0x000000000000C000)
            return (n & 0x0000000000008000) ? 16 : 15;
          else
            return (n & 0x0000000000002000) ? 14 : 13;
        } else {
          if (n & 0x0000000000000C00)
            return (n & 0x0000000000000800) ? 12 : 11;
          else
            return (n & 0x0000000000000200) ? 10 : 9;
        }
      } else {
        if (n & 0x00000000000000F0) {
          if (n & 0x00000000000000C0)
            return (n & 0x0000000000000080) ? 8 : 7;
          else
            return (n & 0x0000000000000020) ? 6 : 5;
        } else {
          if (n & 0x000000000000000C)
            return (n & 0x0000000000000008) ? 4 : 3;
          else
            return (n & 0x0000000000000002) ? 2 : (n ? 1 : 0);
        }
      }
    }
  }
}

int highest_bit(long long n)
{
  const long long mask[] = {
    0x000000007FFFFFFF,
    0x000000000000FFFF,
    0x00000000000000FF,
    0x000000000000000F,
    0x0000000000000003,
    0x0000000000000001
  };
  int hi = 64;
  int lo = 0;
  int i = 0;

  if (n == 0)
    return 0;

  for (i = 0; i < sizeof mask / sizeof mask[0]; i++) {
    int mi = lo + (hi - lo) / 2;

    if ((n >> mi) != 0)
      lo = mi;
    else if ((n & (mask[i] << lo)) != 0)
      hi = mi;
  }

  return lo + 1;
}

Quick and dirty test program:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int highest_bit_unrolled(long long n);
int highest_bit(long long n);

main(int argc, char **argv)
{
  long long n = strtoull(argv[1], NULL, 0);
  int b1, b2;
  long i;
  clock_t start = clock(), mid, end;

  for (i = 0; i < 1000000000; i++)
    b1 = highest_bit_unrolled(n);

  mid = clock();

  for (i = 0; i < 1000000000; i++)
    b2 = highest_bit(n);

  end = clock();

  printf("highest bit of 0x%llx/%lld = %d, %d\n", n, n, b1, b2);

  printf("time1 = %d\n", (int) (mid - start));
  printf("time2 = %d\n", (int) (end - mid));
  return 0;
}

Using only -O2, the difference becomes greater. The decision tree is almost four times faster.

I also benchmarked against the naive bit shifting code:

int highest_bit_shift(long long n)
{
  int i = 0;
  for (; n; n >>= 1, i++)
    ; /* empty */
  return i;
}

This is only fast for small numbers, as one would expect. In determining that the highest bit is 1 for n == 1, it benchmarked more than 80% faster. However, half of randomly chosen numbers in the 63 bit space have the 63rd bit set!

On the input 0x3FFFFFFFFFFFFFFF, the decision tree version is quite a bit faster than it is on 1, and shows to be 1120% faster (12.2 times) than the bit shifter.

I will also benchmark the decision tree against the GCC builtins, and also try a mixture of inputs rather than repeating against the same number. There may be some sticking branch prediction going on and perhaps some unrealistic caching scenarios which makes it artificially faster on repetitions.

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unsigned int
msb32(register unsigned int x)
{
        x |= (x >> 1);
        x |= (x >> 2);
        x |= (x >> 4);
        x |= (x >> 8);
        x |= (x >> 16);
        return(x & ~(x >> 1));
}

1 register, 13 instructions. Believe it or not, this is usually faster than the BSR instruction mentioned above, which operates in linear time. This is logarithmic time.

From http://aggregate.org/MAGIC/#Most%20Significant%201%20Bit

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2  
The above code doesn't answer the question. It returns an unsigned integer where the most significant on bit in x remains on and all the other bits are turned off. The question was to return the position of the most significant on bit. –  Protagonist Mar 23 '09 at 21:55
1  
You can then use a De Bruijn sequence approach to find the index of the bit that's set. :-) –  R.. Feb 6 '11 at 6:55
1  
@Protagonist, he said in a comment that either suffices. –  rlbond Feb 8 '11 at 1:27
    
This one (from that same page) would do what you need, but it requires an additional function. aggregate.org/MAGIC/#Log2%20of%20an%20Integer –  Quinn Taylor Feb 11 '11 at 16:14
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I had a need for a routine to do this and before searching the web (and finding this page) I came up with my own solution basedon a binary search. Although I'm sure someone has done this before! It runs in constant time and can be faster than the "obvious" solution posted, although I'm not making any great claims, just posting it for interest.

int highest_bit(unsigned int a) {
  static const unsigned int maskv[] = { 0xffff, 0xff, 0xf, 0x3, 0x1 };
  const unsigned int *mask = maskv;
  int l, h;

  if (a == 0) return -1;

  l = 0;
  h = 32;

  do {
    int m = l + (h - l) / 2;

    if ((a >> m) != 0) l = m;
    else if ((a & (*mask << l)) != 0) h = m;

    mask++;
  } while (l < h - 1);

  return l;
}
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there's a few implementations here:

http://graphics.stanford.edu/~seander/bithacks.html#ZerosOnRightLinear

(Edit: After rereading your question, I realise that the link above is for finding the rightmost set bit, not leftmost as you require, although without a sense of word size, it's a tricky one to answer)

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That counts zeros on the right; the question was about zeros on the left. At least, in a quick skim I don't see it there. –  Darius Bacon Mar 22 '09 at 23:49
2  
Look at the "Log Base 2" algorithms - as Anderson says in the article: "The log base 2 of an integer is the same as the position of the highest bit set (or most significant bit set, MSB)" –  Michael Burr Mar 23 '09 at 0:46
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Think bitwise operators.

I missunderstood the question the first time. You should produce an int with the leftmost bit set (the others zero). Assuming cmp is set to that value:

position = sizeof(int)*8
while(!(n & cmp)){ 
   n <<=1;
   position--;
}
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What do you mean converting to a string? The definition of ffs takes an int and returns an int. Where would the conversion be? And what purpose would the conversion serve if we are looking for bits in a word? –  dreamlax Mar 23 '09 at 3:31
    
I didn't know of that function. –  Vasil Mar 23 '09 at 3:37
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Here are some (simple) benchmarks, of algorithms currently given on this page...

The algorithms have not been tested over all inputs of unsigned int; so check that first, before blindly using something ;)

On my machine clz (__builtin_clz) and asm work best. asm seems even faster then clz... but it might be due to the simple benchmark...

//////// go.c ///////////////////////////////
// compile with:  gcc go.c -o go -lm
#include <math.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>

/***************** math ********************/

#define POS_OF_HIGHESTBITmath(a) /* 0th position is the Least-Signif-Bit */    \
  ((unsigned) log2(a))         /* thus: do not use if a <= 0 */  

#define NUM_OF_HIGHESTBITmath(a) ((a)               \
                  ? (1U << POS_OF_HIGHESTBITmath(a))    \
                  : 0)



/***************** clz ********************/

unsigned NUM_BITS_U = ((sizeof(unsigned) << 3) - 1);
#define POS_OF_HIGHESTBITclz(a) (NUM_BITS_U - __builtin_clz(a)) /* only works for a != 0 */

#define NUM_OF_HIGHESTBITclz(a) ((a)                    \
                 ? (1U << POS_OF_HIGHESTBITclz(a))  \
                 : 0)


/***************** i2f ********************/

double FF;
#define POS_OF_HIGHESTBITi2f(a) (FF = (double)(ui|1), ((*(1+(unsigned*)&FF))>>20)-1023)


#define NUM_OF_HIGHESTBITi2f(a) ((a)                    \
                 ? (1U << POS_OF_HIGHESTBITi2f(a))  \
                 : 0)




/***************** asm ********************/

unsigned OUT;
#define POS_OF_HIGHESTBITasm(a) (({asm("bsrl %1,%0" : "=r"(OUT) : "r"(a));}), OUT)

#define NUM_OF_HIGHESTBITasm(a) ((a)                    \
                 ? (1U << POS_OF_HIGHESTBITasm(a))  \
                 : 0)




/***************** bitshift1 ********************/

#define NUM_OF_HIGHESTBITbitshift1(a) (({   \
  OUT = a;                  \
  OUT |= (OUT >> 1);                \
  OUT |= (OUT >> 2);                \
  OUT |= (OUT >> 4);                \
  OUT |= (OUT >> 8);                \
  OUT |= (OUT >> 16);               \
      }), (OUT & ~(OUT >> 1)))          \



/***************** bitshift2 ********************/
int POS[32] = {0, 1, 28, 2, 29, 14, 24, 3,
             30, 22, 20, 15, 25, 17, 4, 8, 31, 27, 13, 23, 21, 19,
             16, 7, 26, 12, 18, 6, 11, 5, 10, 9};

#define POS_OF_HIGHESTBITbitshift2(a) (({   \
  OUT = a;                  \
  OUT |= OUT >> 1;              \
  OUT |= OUT >> 2;              \
  OUT |= OUT >> 4;              \
  OUT |= OUT >> 8;              \
  OUT |= OUT >> 16;             \
  OUT = (OUT >> 1) + 1;             \
      }), POS[(OUT * 0x077CB531UL) >> 27])

#define NUM_OF_HIGHESTBITbitshift2(a) ((a)              \
                       ? (1U << POS_OF_HIGHESTBITbitshift2(a)) \
                       : 0)



#define LOOPS 100000000U

int main()
{
  time_t start, end;
  unsigned ui;
  unsigned n;

  /********* Checking the first few unsigned values (you'll need to check all if you want to use an algorithm here) **************/
  printf("math\n");
  for (ui = 0U; ui < 18; ++ui)
    printf("%i\t%i\n", ui, NUM_OF_HIGHESTBITmath(ui));

  printf("\n\n");

  printf("clz\n");
  for (ui = 0U; ui < 18U; ++ui)
    printf("%i\t%i\n", ui, NUM_OF_HIGHESTBITclz(ui));

  printf("\n\n");

  printf("i2f\n");
  for (ui = 0U; ui < 18U; ++ui)
    printf("%i\t%i\n", ui, NUM_OF_HIGHESTBITi2f(ui));

  printf("\n\n");

  printf("asm\n");
  for (ui = 0U; ui < 18U; ++ui) {
    printf("%i\t%i\n", ui, NUM_OF_HIGHESTBITasm(ui));
  }

  printf("\n\n");

  printf("bitshift1\n");
  for (ui = 0U; ui < 18U; ++ui) {
    printf("%i\t%i\n", ui, NUM_OF_HIGHESTBITbitshift1(ui));
  }

  printf("\n\n");

  printf("bitshift2\n");
  for (ui = 0U; ui < 18U; ++ui) {
    printf("%i\t%i\n", ui, NUM_OF_HIGHESTBITbitshift2(ui));
  }

  printf("\n\nPlease wait...\n\n");


  /************************* Simple clock() benchmark ******************/
  start = clock();
  for (ui = 0; ui < LOOPS; ++ui)
    n = NUM_OF_HIGHESTBITmath(ui);
  end = clock();
  printf("math:\t%e\n", (double)(end-start)/CLOCKS_PER_SEC);

  start = clock();
  for (ui = 0; ui < LOOPS; ++ui)
    n = NUM_OF_HIGHESTBITclz(ui);
  end = clock();
  printf("clz:\t%e\n", (double)(end-start)/CLOCKS_PER_SEC);

  start = clock();
  for (ui = 0; ui < LOOPS; ++ui)
    n = NUM_OF_HIGHESTBITi2f(ui);
  end = clock();
  printf("i2f:\t%e\n", (double)(end-start)/CLOCKS_PER_SEC);

  start = clock();
  for (ui = 0; ui < LOOPS; ++ui)
    n = NUM_OF_HIGHESTBITasm(ui);
  end = clock();
  printf("asm:\t%e\n", (double)(end-start)/CLOCKS_PER_SEC);

  start = clock();
  for (ui = 0; ui < LOOPS; ++ui)
    n = NUM_OF_HIGHESTBITbitshift1(ui);
  end = clock();
  printf("bitshift1:\t%e\n", (double)(end-start)/CLOCKS_PER_SEC);

  start = clock();
  for (ui = 0; ui < LOOPS; ++ui)
    n = NUM_OF_HIGHESTBITbitshift2(ui);
  end = clock();
  printf("bitshift2\t%e\n", (double)(end-start)/CLOCKS_PER_SEC);

  printf("\nThe lower, the better. Take note that a negative exponent is good! ;)\n");

  return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
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Expanding on Josh's benchmark... one can improve the clz as follows

/***************** clz2 ********************/

#define NUM_OF_HIGHESTBITclz2(a) ((a)                              \
                  ? (((1U) << (sizeof(unsigned)*8-1)) >> __builtin_clz(a)) \
                  : 0)

Regarding the asm: note that there are bsr and bsrl (this is the "long" version). the normal one might be a bit faster.

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Putting this in since it's 'yet another' approach, seems to be different from others already given.

returns -1 if x==0, otherwise floor( log2(x)) (max result 31)

Reduce from 32 to 4 bit problem, then use a table. Perhaps inelegant, but pragmatic.

This is what I use when I don't want to use __builtin_clz because of portability issues.

To make it more compact, one could instead use a loop to reduce, adding 4 to r each time, max 7 iterations. Or some hybrid, such as (for 64 bits): loop to reduce to 8, test to reduce to 4.

int log2floor( unsigned x ){
   static const signed char wtab[16] = {-1,0,1,1, 2,2,2,2, 3,3,3,3,3,3,3,3};
   int r = 0;
   unsigned xk = x >> 16;
   if( xk != 0 ){
       r = 16;
       x = xk;
   }
   // x is 0 .. 0xFFFF
   xk = x >> 8;
   if( xk != 0){
       r += 8;
       x = xk;
   }
   // x is 0 .. 0xFF
   xk = x >> 4;
   if( xk != 0){
       r += 4;
       x = xk;
   }
   // now x is 0..15; x=0 only if originally zero.
   return r + wtab[x];

}

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Although I would probably only use this method if I absolutely required the best possible performance (e.g. for writing some sort of board game AI involving bitboards), the most efficient solution is to use inline ASM. See the Optimisations section of this blog post for code with an explanation.

[...], the bsrl assembly instruction computes the position of the most significant bit. Thus, we could use this asm statement:

asm ("bsrl %1, %0" 
     : "=r" (position) 
     : "r" (number));
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To expand: the standard loop solution (shifting left and checking MSB) is probably the most readable. As in all cases involving bit twiddling, the speed of ASM can't be beaten, though there's no point cluttering your code unless necessary. Hacks are an in-between solution - go one way or the other. –  Noldorin Mar 23 '09 at 0:05
    
I'd say taking the logarithm would be a perfectly readable solution (check the generated asm to see if the compiler can optimize it to use this asm instruction) –  jalf Mar 23 '09 at 1:22
    
Sometimes the inline ASM solution is slower, depending on the implementation in CPU microcode. –  rlbond Mar 23 '09 at 4:39
1  
@rlbound: I can hardly believe that, although I may be mistaken. On any modern CPU one would think that it would get translated to a single instruction.... –  Noldorin Mar 23 '09 at 12:04
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What about

int highest_bit(unsigned int a) {
    int count;
    std::frexp(a, &count);
    return count - 1;
}

?

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As the answers above point out, there are a number of ways to determine the most significant bit. However, as was also pointed out, the methods are likely to be unique to either 32bit or 64bit registers. The stanford.edu bithacks page provides solutions that work for both 32bit and 64bit computing. With a little work, they can be combined to provide a solid cross-architecture approach to obtaining the MSB. The solution I arrived at that compiled/worked across 64 & 32 bit computers was:

#if defined(__LP64__) || defined(_LP64)
# define BUILD_64   1
#endif

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>  /* for uint32_t */

/* CHAR_BIT  (or include limits.h) */
#ifndef CHAR_BIT
#define CHAR_BIT  8
#endif  /* CHAR_BIT */

/* 
 * Find the log base 2 of an integer with the MSB N set in O(N)
 * operations. (on 64bit & 32bit architectures)
 */
int
getmsb (uint32_t word)
{
    int r = 0;
    if (word < 1)
        return 0;
#ifdef BUILD_64
    union { uint32_t u[2]; double d; } t;  // temp
    t.u[__FLOAT_WORD_ORDER==LITTLE_ENDIAN] = 0x43300000;
    t.u[__FLOAT_WORD_ORDER!=LITTLE_ENDIAN] = word;
    t.d -= 4503599627370496.0;
    r = (t.u[__FLOAT_WORD_ORDER==LITTLE_ENDIAN] >> 20) - 0x3FF;
#else
    while (word >>= 1)
    {
        r++;
    }
#endif  /* BUILD_64 */
    return r;
}
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Wasn't int r; originally defined above the #ifdef BUILD_64 flag? In which case it would not need redefinition within the conditional. –  David C. Rankin Jun 21 at 9:25
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One approach could be to keep shifting left till the number becomes negative.

Here is the code:

Funct() { 
  int number; int count;

  while(number > 0) {
    number = number << 1;
    count++;
  }

  printf("It is the no "%d" bit from the left", (count+1));    
}
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Without initializing count (let alone number) this will yield unpredictable results. Also, if you shift to the right instead, you'll get the number of the MSB, rather than the number of leading zeroes. –  Quinn Taylor Feb 11 '11 at 15:44
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