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I am trying to escape a while loop. Basically, if the "if" condition is met, I would like to be able to exit this loop:

private void CheckLog()
{
    while (true)
    {
        Thread.Sleep(5000);
        if (!System.IO.File.Exists("Command.bat"))
            continue;

        using (System.IO.StreamReader sr = System.IO.File.OpenText("Command.bat"))
        {
            string s = "";
            while ((s = sr.ReadLine()) != null)
            {
                if (s.Contains("mp4:production/CATCHUP/"))
                {
                    RemoveEXELog();

                    Process p = new Process();
                    p.StartInfo.WorkingDirectory = "dump";
                    p.StartInfo.FileName = "test.exe";
                    p.StartInfo.Arguments = s;
                    p.Start();

                    << Escape here - if the "if" condition is met, escape the loop here >>
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
5  
break; does not work? – Jon Jul 16 '11 at 19:17
2  
does C# have a goto command? – David Heffernan Jul 16 '11 at 19:18
    
@David - Yes, and if the OP is trying to exit the outer loop, this is one of the rare cases where using goto is a good idea. – Yakimych Jul 16 '11 at 19:22
    
"Which loop exactly"? – user166390 Jul 16 '11 at 19:22
1  
@pst what is labelled break and how is it superior to goto? – David Heffernan Jul 16 '11 at 19:28
up vote 28 down vote accepted

Use break; to escape the first loop:

if (s.Contains("mp4:production/CATCHUP/"))
{
   RemoveEXELog();
   Process p = new Process();
   p.StartInfo.WorkingDirectory = "dump";
   p.StartInfo.FileName = "test.exe"; 
   p.StartInfo.Arguments = s; 
   p.Start();
   break;
}

If you want to also escape the second loop, you might need to use a flag and check in the out loop's guard:

        boolean breakFlag = false;
        while (!breakFlag)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(5000);
            if (!System.IO.File.Exists("Command.bat")) continue;
            using (System.IO.StreamReader sr = System.IO.File.OpenText("Command.bat"))
            {
                string s = "";
                while ((s = sr.ReadLine()) != null)
                {
                    if (s.Contains("mp4:production/CATCHUP/"))
                    {

                        RemoveEXELog();

                        Process p = new Process();
                        p.StartInfo.WorkingDirectory = "dump";
                        p.StartInfo.FileName = "test.exe"; 
                        p.StartInfo.Arguments = s; 
                        p.Start();

                        breakFlag = true;
                        break;
                    }
                }
            }

Or, if you want to just exit the function completely from within the nested loop, put in a return; instead of a break;.

But these aren't really considered best practices. You should find some way to add the necessary Boolean logic into your while guards.

share|improve this answer

But you might also want to look into a very different approach, listening for file-system events.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for non-box thinking – tomfumb Jul 16 '11 at 21:20
    
@Bobby interesting approach – Nic Nov 20 '15 at 9:51

If you need to continue with additional logic use...

break;

or if you have a value to return...

return my_value_to_be_returned;

However, looking at your code, I believe you will control the loop with the revised example below without using a break or return...

private void CheckLog()
        {
            bool continueLoop = true;
            while (continueLoop)
            {
                Thread.Sleep(5000);
                if (!System.IO.File.Exists("Command.bat")) continue;
                using (System.IO.StreamReader sr = System.IO.File.OpenText("Command.bat"))
                {
                    string s = "";
                    while (continueLoop && (s = sr.ReadLine()) != null)
                    {
                        if (s.Contains("mp4:production/CATCHUP/"))
                        {
                            RemoveEXELog();

                            Process p = new Process();
                            p.StartInfo.WorkingDirectory = "dump";
                            p.StartInfo.FileName = "test.exe"; 
                            p.StartInfo.Arguments = s; 
                            p.Start();
                            continueLoop = false;
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
share|improve this answer

break or goto

while ( true ) {
  if ( conditional ) {
    break;
  }
  if ( other conditional ) {
    goto EndWhile;
  }
}
EndWhile:
share|improve this answer
2  
Goto is an awe-full thing. – Dementic Jun 22 '14 at 15:25
    
Don't use goto but the solution with break ist good – Florian Neiss Mar 19 '15 at 14:39

Which loop are you trying to exit? A simple break; will exit the inner loop. For the outer loop, you could use an outer loop-scoped variable (e.g. boolean exit = false;) which is set to true just before you break your inner loop. After the inner loop block check the value of exit and if true use break; again.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for considering both loops (and not mentioning the 4-letter keyword). – Joel Rondeau Jul 16 '11 at 19:22

"break" is a command that breaks out of the "closest" loop.

While there are many good uses for break, you shouldn't use it if you don't have to -- it can be seen as just another way to use goto, which is considered bad.

For example, why not:

while (!(the condition you're using to break))
        {
         //Your code here.
        }

If the reason you're using "break" is because you don't want to continue execution of that iteration of the loop, you may want to use the "continue" keyword, which immediately jumps to the next iteration of the loop, whether it be while or for.

while (!condition) {
   //Some code
   if (condition) continue;
   //More code that will be skipped over if the condition was true
}
share|improve this answer
2  
break is only considered bad by dogmatists. All keywords can be used badly. All keywords can be used well. – David Heffernan Jul 16 '11 at 19:26
    
My answer already said there are many good uses for break. – Jeremy Jul 16 '11 at 19:56

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