Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a better way to get the Property name when passed in via a lambda expression? Here is what i currently have.

eg.

GetSortingInfo<User>(u => u.UserId);

It worked by casting it as a memberexpression only when the property was a string. because not all properties are strings i had to use object but then it would return a unaryexpression for those.

public static RouteValueDictionary GetInfo<T>(this HtmlHelper html, 
    Expression<Func<T, object>> action) where T : class
{
    var expression = GetMemberInfo(action);
    string name = expression.Member.Name;

    return GetInfo(html, name);
}

private static MemberExpression GetMemberInfo(Expression method)
{
    LambdaExpression lambda = method as LambdaExpression;
    if (lambda == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("method");

    MemberExpression memberExpr = null;

    if (lambda.Body.NodeType == ExpressionType.Convert)
    {
        memberExpr = 
            ((UnaryExpression)lambda.Body).Operand as MemberExpression;
    }
    else if (lambda.Body.NodeType == ExpressionType.MemberAccess)
    {
        memberExpr = lambda.Body as MemberExpression;
    }

    if (memberExpr == null)
        throw new ArgumentException("method");

    return memberExpr;
}
share|improve this question
    
Better as in nicer code? I don't think so. The typechecking only extends to the overall expression, so you really do need the checks you have in at runtime. :( –  MichaelGG Mar 23 '09 at 3:56
    
Yeah...was just wondering if there was a better way to do it, as it felt a little hacky to me. But if thats it then cool. thanks. –  Schotime Mar 23 '09 at 4:20
    
I updated re your comment; but using a lambda to get a string so that you can use dynamic LINQ strikes me as doing things backwards... if you use a lambda, use a lambda ;-p You don't have to do the entire query in one step - you could use "regular/lambda" OrderBy, "dynamic LINQ/string" Where, etc. –  Marc Gravell Mar 23 '09 at 8:37
    
It is to generate the parameters to be passed through querystring on URL to tell it which order to display the list. I could not use dynamic linq but then i would have to have a case statement for every column. The GetInfo() is called as the 3rd parameter on the actionlink helper. –  Schotime Mar 23 '09 at 22:07
1  
possible duplicate of get-property-name-and-type-using-lambda-expression –  nawfal Dec 11 '13 at 23:13
show 1 more comment

10 Answers

I recently did a very similar thing to make a type safe OnPropertyChanged method.

Here's a method that'll return the PropertyInfo object for the expression. It throws an exception if the expression is not a property.

public PropertyInfo GetPropertyInfo<TSource, TProperty>(
    TSource source,
    Expression<Func<TSource, TProperty>> propertyLambda)
{
    Type type = typeof(TSource);

    MemberExpression member = propertyLambda.Body as MemberExpression;
    if (member == null)
        throw new ArgumentException(string.Format(
            "Expression '{0}' refers to a method, not a property.",
            propertyLambda.ToString()));

    PropertyInfo propInfo = member.Member as PropertyInfo;
    if (propInfo == null)
        throw new ArgumentException(string.Format(
            "Expression '{0}' refers to a field, not a property.",
            propertyLambda.ToString()));

    if (type != propInfo.ReflectedType &&
        !type.IsSubclassOf(propInfo.ReflectedType))
        throw new ArgumentException(string.Format(
            "Expresion '{0}' refers to a property that is not from type {1}.",
            propertyLambda.ToString(),
            type));

    return propInfo;
}

The source parameter is used so the compiler can do type inference on the method call. You can do the following

var propertyInfo = GetPropertyInfo(someUserObject, u => u.UserID);
share|improve this answer
4  
Why is the last check regarding TSource in there? The lambda is strongly typed so I don't think it's necessary. –  HappyNomad Apr 22 '12 at 0:02
5  
Also, as of 2012, type inference works fine without the source parameter. –  HappyNomad Apr 22 '12 at 0:56
2  
@HappyNomad Imagine an object which has as a member, an instance of a third type. u => u.OtherType.OtherTypesProperty would create such a case that the last statement is checking for. –  joshperry Dec 12 '12 at 15:13
3  
The last if statement should be: if (type != propInfo.ReflectedType && !type.IsSubclassOf(propInfo.ReflectedType) && !propInfo.ReflectedType.IsAssignableFrom(type)) to allow for interfaces too. –  GrayKing Apr 18 '13 at 13:14
1  
@GrayKing wouldn't that be the same as just if(!propInfo.ReflectedType.IsAssignableFrom(type))? –  Connell Watkins Jan 23 at 14:24
show 1 more comment
up vote 79 down vote accepted

I found another way you can do it was to have the source and property strongly typed and explicitly infer the input for the lamda. Not sure if that is correct terminology but here is the result.

public static RouteValueDictionary GetInfo<T,P>(this HtmlHelper html, Expression<Func<T, P>> action) where T : class
{
    var expression = (MemberExpression)action.Body;
    string name = expression.Member.Name;

    return GetInfo(html, name);
}

And then call it like so.

GetInfo((User u) => u.UserId);

and voila it works. Thanks all.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I was playing around with the same thing and worked this up. It's not fully tested but seems to handle the issue with value types (the unaryexpression issue you ran into)

public static string GetName(Expression<Func<object>> exp)
{
    MemberExpression body = exp.Body as MemberExpression;

    if (body == null) {
       UnaryExpression ubody = (UnaryExpression)exp.Body;
       body = ubody.Operand as MemberExpression;
    }

    return body.Member.Name;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This very cool dude ... –  user137348 Jan 11 '11 at 13:09
3  
Nice work catching the Unary condition... +1 –  Gabe Jul 6 '11 at 18:41
2  
Lines 9 and 11 are equal. Why not remove else ? Like that pastebin.com/aV84BJ9v –  Grigory Sep 13 '11 at 15:43
    
Sorry Belorus, this was a bigger chunk of code that I carved a piece out of, and didn't clean up. :/ Your right the code could be condensed. (val is also never used in this example) –  M Thelen Apr 18 '12 at 17:53
1  
tried this recently (from another question), found out it does not handle subproperties: o => o.Thing1.Thing2 would return Thing2, not Thing1.Thing2, which is incorrect if you're trying to use it in EntityFramework includes –  drzaus Jun 20 '13 at 17:59
show 2 more comments
public string GetName<TSource, TField>(Expression<Func<TSource, TField>> Field)
{
    return (Field.Body as MemberExpression ?? ((UnaryExpression)Field.Body).Operand as MemberExpression).Member.Name;
}

This handles member and unary expressions. The difference being that you will get a UnaryExpression if your expression represents a value type whereas you will get a MemberExpression if your expression represents a reference type. Everything can be cast to an object, but value types must be boxed. This is why the UnaryExpression exists. Reference.

For the sakes of readability (@Jowen), here's an expanded equivalent:

public string GetName<TSource, TField>(Expression<Func<TSource, TField>> Field)
{
    if (object.Equals(Field, null))
    {
        throw new NullReferenceException("Field is required");
    }

    MemberExpression expr = null;

    if (Field.Body is MemberExpression)
    {
        expr = (MemberExpression)Field.Body;
    }
    else if (Field.Body is UnaryExpression)
    {
        expr = (MemberExpression)((UnaryExpression)Field.Body).Operand;
    }
    else
    {
        const string Format = "Expression '{0}' not supported.";
        string message = string.Format(Format, Field);

        throw new ArgumentException(message, "Field");
    }

    return expr.Member.Name;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I find this unreadable. Seems like C++ code to me –  Jowen Nov 21 '13 at 12:41
4  
@Jowen. It's just shorthand, feel free to expand it with your preferred syntax. The point is, it does the job. –  flem Nov 21 '13 at 12:52
1  
@Jowen, I've updated my answer with a more thorough, code sample (but ultimately does the same job). –  flem Nov 21 '13 at 13:00
2  
I understand it does the job, but SO is for humans, so readability is very important! Kudos for the rewrite though :) –  Jowen Nov 21 '13 at 13:03
add comment

There's an edge case when it comes to Array.Length. While 'Length' is exposed a property, you can't use it in any of the previously proposed solutions.

using Contract = System.Diagnostics.Contracts.Contract;
using Exprs = System.Linq.Expressions;

static string PropertyNameFromMemberExpr(Exprs.MemberExpression expr)
{
    return expr.Member.Name;
}

static string PropertyNameFromUnaryExpr(Exprs.UnaryExpression expr)
{
    if (expr.NodeType == Exprs.ExpressionType.ArrayLength)
        return "Length";

    var mem_expr = expr.Operand as Exprs.MemberExpression;

    return PropertyNameFromMemberExpr(mem_expr);
}

static string PropertyNameFromLambdaExpr(Exprs.LambdaExpression expr)
{
         if (expr.Body is Exprs.MemberExpression)   return PropertyNameFromMemberExpr(expr.Body as Exprs.MemberExpression);
    else if (expr.Body is Exprs.UnaryExpression)    return PropertyNameFromUnaryExpr(expr.Body as Exprs.UnaryExpression);

    throw new NotSupportedException();
}

public static string PropertyNameFromExpr<TProp>(Exprs.Expression<Func<TProp>> expr)
{
    Contract.Requires<ArgumentNullException>(expr != null);
    Contract.Requires<ArgumentException>(expr.Body is Exprs.MemberExpression || expr.Body is Exprs.UnaryExpression);

    return PropertyNameFromLambdaExpr(expr);
}

public static string PropertyNameFromExpr<T, TProp>(Exprs.Expression<Func<T, TProp>> expr)
{
    Contract.Requires<ArgumentNullException>(expr != null);
    Contract.Requires<ArgumentException>(expr.Body is Exprs.MemberExpression || expr.Body is Exprs.UnaryExpression);

    return PropertyNameFromLambdaExpr(expr);
}

Now example usage:

int[] someArray = new int[1];
Console.WriteLine(PropertyNameFromExpr( () => someArray.Length ));

If PropertyNameFromUnaryExpr didn't check for ArrayLength, "someArray" would be printed to the console (compiler seems to generate direct access to the backing Length field, as an optimization, even in Debug, thus the special case).

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting I must say! –  Andrei Rînea Aug 28 '12 at 9:30
    
Oh my.. deserves +1.. –  nawfal Oct 11 '13 at 19:35
    
Definitely a +1! Great observation and a very neat code. –  Ivaylo Slavov Nov 1 '13 at 7:40
    
+1: Very nicely partitioned into methods of SRP. –  fourpastmidnight Feb 20 at 14:22
add comment

I've found that some of the suggested answers which drill down into the MemberExpression/UnaryExpression don't capture nested/subproperties.

ex) o => o.Thing1.Thing2 returns Thing1 rather than Thing1.Thing2.

This distinction is important if you're trying to work with EntityFramework DbSet.Include(...).

I've found that just parsing the Expression.ToString() seems to work fine, and comparatively quickly. I compared it against the UnaryExpression version, and even getting ToString off of the Member/UnaryExpression to see if that was faster, but the difference was negligible. Please correct me if this is a terrible idea.

The Extension Method

/// <summary>
/// Given an expression, extract the listed property name; similar to reflection but with familiar LINQ+lambdas.  Technique @via http://stackoverflow.com/a/16647343/1037948
/// </summary>
/// <remarks>Cheats and uses the tostring output -- Should consult performance differences</remarks>
/// <typeparam name="TModel">the model type to extract property names</typeparam>
/// <typeparam name="TValue">the value type of the expected property</typeparam>
/// <param name="propertySelector">expression that just selects a model property to be turned into a string</param>
/// <param name="delimiter">Expression toString delimiter to split from lambda param</param>
/// <param name="endTrim">Sometimes the Expression toString contains a method call, something like "Convert(x)", so we need to strip the closing part from the end</pa ram >
/// <returns>indicated property name</returns>
public static string GetPropertyName<TModel, TValue>(this Expression<Func<TModel, TValue>> propertySelector, char delimiter = '.', char endTrim = ')') {

    var asString = propertySelector.ToString(); // gives you: "o => o.Whatever"
    var firstDelim = asString.IndexOf(delimiter); // make sure there is a beginning property indicator; the "." in "o.Whatever" -- this may not be necessary?

    return firstDelim < 0
        ? asString
        : asString.Substring(firstDelim+1).TrimEnd(endTrim);
}//--   fn  GetPropertyNameExtended

(Checking for the delimiter might even be overkill)

Demo (LinqPad)

Demonstration + Comparison code -- https://gist.github.com/zaus/6992590

share|improve this answer
1  
+ 1 very interesting. Have you continued to use this method in your own code? does it work ok? have you discovered any edge cases? –  Benjamin Gale Jul 28 '13 at 17:55
1  
@Benjamin so far so good. –  drzaus Aug 1 '13 at 20:13
    
I fail to see your idea. Going by the answer you linked o => o.Thing1.Thing2 doesn't return Thing1 as you say but Thing2. In fact your answer returns something like Thing1.Thing2 which may or may not be desired. –  nawfal Oct 11 '13 at 19:57
    
Doesn't work with the case korman cautions: stackoverflow.com/a/11006147/661933. Always better to avoid hacks. –  nawfal Oct 11 '13 at 19:58
    
@nawfal #1 -- the original problem is that you want Thing1.Thing2, never Thing1. I said Thing2 meaning the value of o.Thing1.Thing2, which is the point of the predicate. I'll update the answer to reflect that intention. –  drzaus Oct 15 '13 at 14:05
show 6 more comments

Well, there's no need to call .Name.ToString(), but broadly that is about it, yes. The only consideration you might need is whether x.Foo.Bar should return "Foo", "Bar", or an exception - i.e. do you need to iterate at all.

(re comment) for more on flexible sorting, see here.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah...its only a first level thing, used for generating a sorting column link. eg. If I have a model and i want to display the column name to sort by i can use a strongly typed link to the object to get the property name for which dynamic linq won't have a cow over. cheers. –  Schotime Mar 23 '09 at 5:30
    
ToString should give ugly results for unary expressions. –  nawfal Oct 11 '13 at 20:00
add comment

I created an extension method on ObjectStateEntry to be able to flag properties (of Entity Framework POCO classes) as modified in a type safe manner, since the default method only accepts a string. Here's my way of getting the name from the property:

public static void SetModifiedProperty<T>(this System.Data.Objects.ObjectStateEntry state, Expression<Func<T>> action)
{
    var body = (MemberExpression)action.Body;
    string propertyName = body.Member.Name;

    state.SetModifiedProperty(propertyName);
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

I have done the INotifyPropertyChanged implementation similar to the method below. Here the properties are stored in a dictionary in the base class shown below. It is of course not always desirable to use inheritance, but for view models I think it is acceptable and gives very clean property references in the view model classes.

public class PhotoDetailsViewModel
    : PropertyChangedNotifierBase<PhotoDetailsViewModel>
{
    public bool IsLoading
    {
        get { return GetValue(x => x.IsLoading); }
        set { SetPropertyValue(x => x.IsLoading, value); }
    }

    public string PendingOperation
    {
        get { return GetValue(x => x.PendingOperation); }
        set { SetPropertyValue(x => x.PendingOperation, value); }
    }

    public PhotoViewModel Photo
    {
        get { return GetValue(x => x.Photo); }
        set { SetPropertyValue(x => x.Photo, value); }
    }
}

The somewhat more complex base class is shown below. It handles the translation from lambda expression to property name. Note that the properties are really pseudo properties since only the names are used. But it will appear transparent to the view model and references to the properties on the view model.

public class PropertyChangedNotifierBase<T> : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    readonly Dictionary<string, object> _properties = new Dictionary<string, object>();

    protected U GetValue<U>(Expression<Func<T, U>> property)
    {
        var propertyName = GetPropertyName(property);

        return GetValue<U>(propertyName);
    }

    private U GetValue<U>(string propertyName)
    {
        object value;

        if (!_properties.TryGetValue(propertyName, out value))
        {
            return default(U);
        }

        return (U)value;
    }

    protected void SetPropertyValue<U>(Expression<Func<T, U>> property, U value)
    {
        var propertyName = GetPropertyName(property);

        var oldValue = GetValue<U>(propertyName);

        if (Object.ReferenceEquals(oldValue, value))
        {
            return;
        }
        _properties[propertyName] = value;

        RaisePropertyChangedEvent(propertyName);
    }

    protected void RaisePropertyChangedEvent<U>(Expression<Func<T, U>> property)
    {
        var name = GetPropertyName(property);
        RaisePropertyChangedEvent(name);
    }

    protected void RaisePropertyChangedEvent(string propertyName)
    {
        if (PropertyChanged != null)
        {
            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
        }
    }

    private static string GetPropertyName<U>(Expression<Func<T, U>> property)
    {
        if (property == null)
        {
            throw new NullReferenceException("property");
        }

        var lambda = property as LambdaExpression;

        var memberAssignment = (MemberExpression) lambda.Body;
        return memberAssignment.Member.Name;
    }

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
You're basically maintaining a property bag. Not bad, but those calls from getters and setters of model class is little easier like public bool IsLoading { get { return GetValue(MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod().Name); } set { SetPropertyValue(MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod().Name, value); } }. Could be slower, but more generic and straightforward. –  nawfal Dec 18 '13 at 18:16
add comment

This is a general implementation to get the string name of fields/properties/indexers/methods/extension methods/delegates of struct/class/interface/delegate/array. I have tested with combinations of static/instance and non-generic/generic variants.

//involves recursion
public static string GetMemberName(this LambdaExpression memberSelector)
{
    Func<Expression, string> nameSelector = null;  //recursive func
    nameSelector = e => //or move the entire thing to a separate recursive method
    {
        switch (e.NodeType)
        {
            case ExpressionType.Parameter:
                return ((ParameterExpression)e).Name;
            case ExpressionType.MemberAccess:
                return ((MemberExpression)e).Member.Name;
            case ExpressionType.Call:
                return ((MethodCallExpression)e).Method.Name;
            case ExpressionType.Convert:
            case ExpressionType.ConvertChecked:
                return nameSelector(((UnaryExpression)e).Operand);
            case ExpressionType.Invoke:
                return nameSelector(((InvocationExpression)e).Expression);
            case ExpressionType.ArrayLength:
                return "Length";
            default:
                throw new Exception("not a proper member selector");
        }
    };

    return nameSelector(memberSelector.Body);
}

This thing can be written in a simple while loop too:

//iteration based
public static string GetMemberName(this LambdaExpression memberSelector)
{
    var currentExpression = memberSelector.Body;

    while (true)
    {
        switch (currentExpression.NodeType)
        {
            case ExpressionType.Parameter:
                return ((ParameterExpression)currentExpression).Name;
            case ExpressionType.MemberAccess:
                return ((MemberExpression)currentExpression).Member.Name;
            case ExpressionType.Call:
                return ((MethodCallExpression)currentExpression).Method.Name;
            case ExpressionType.Convert:
            case ExpressionType.ConvertChecked:
                currentExpression = ((UnaryExpression)currentExpression).Operand;
                break;
            case ExpressionType.Invoke:
                currentExpression = ((InvocationExpression)currentExpression).Expression;
                break;
            case ExpressionType.ArrayLength:
                return "Length";
            default:
                throw new Exception("not a proper member selector");
        }
    }
}

I like the recursive approach, though the second one might be easier to read. One can call it like:

someExpr = x => x.Property.ExtensionMethod()[0]; //or
someExpr = x => Static.Method().Field; //or
someExpr = x => VoidMethod(); //or
someExpr = () => localVariable; //or
someExpr = x => x; //or
someExpr = x => (Type)x; //or
someExpr = () => Array[0].Delegate(null); //etc

string name = someExpr.GetMemberName();

to print the last member.

Note:

  1. In case of chained expressions like A.B.C, "C" is returned.

  2. This doesn't work with consts, array indexers or enums (impossible to cover all cases).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.