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The code given here when compiled by g++ runs fine but gives error on compiling with gcc. Obviously, this is correct for C++ but not for C. Please help me to correct the syntax for C.

# include <stdio.h>
typedef struct demo
{
    int arr[20], i;
    void setvalue(int num)
    {for(i=0;i<20;i++)arr[i]=num;}

    void printvalue()
    {for(i=0;i<20;i++)printf("%d ",arr[i]);}
} example;

int main()
{
    example e;
    e.setvalue(100);
    e.printvalue();
    return 0;
}

Error log:

stov.c:7:2: error: expected ‘:’, ‘,’, ‘;’, ‘}’ or ‘__attribute__’ before ‘{’ token
stov.c: In function ‘main’:
stov.c:18:3: error: ‘example’ has no member named ‘setvalue’
stov.c:19:3: error: ‘example’ has no member named ‘printvalue’
share|improve this question
1  
It would be nice when asking such questions to tell us what the error is. – Bart Jul 16 '11 at 19:28
7  
Is your space bar broken? And your enter-key a bit dodgy? – mu is too short Jul 16 '11 at 19:39
4  
I didn’t downvote this but I understood those who did: C and C++ are fundamentally different, and your question makes no sense; you are essentially asking “I did X, why isn’t unrelated Y working?” Would you expect your code to work on a Pascal compiler? In JavaScript? In Haskell? Certainly not. Then why should it work in C? The common, unreasonable conflation of C and C++ is really quite tedious. – Konrad Rudolph Jul 16 '11 at 20:04
    
but, answering simply "C++ is not C, despite the name, and for example here C does not allow 'functions' inside struct" or similar better explanation, is more helpful. Or maybe linking to SO Qs/As that can help the OP to have a better idea about what is C++ and what is C... even suggesting to read this or that book to be enlightened... and so on. Almost everything in this case is better than a long-term downvote. – ShinTakezou Jul 16 '11 at 21:31
up vote 10 down vote accepted

You can't have methods in C (that function in the struct). There's more than one way to solve this, but I would simply pass the object as the first argument to the function:

void setvalue(struct demo *d, int num)
{
    int i;
    for(i = 0; i < 20; i++)
        d->arr[i] = num;
}


/* ... */
setvalue(&e, 100);
share|improve this answer
1  
you can't have methods in C++ either. (member functions) – Cory Nelson Jul 16 '11 at 19:30
5  
@Cory, sure you can? member functions are one of the biggest differences between C and C++... – bdonlan Jul 16 '11 at 19:34
6  
@bdonlan: I think Cory is being nit-picky and pointing out that in C++, methods are called member functions, which is a valid point, but not actually useful. :) – Williham Totland Jul 16 '11 at 19:39
3  
@Williham Totland: To be nitty picky. That's the definition of method. They may not be explicitly mention in the C++ standard as such but in the greater OO perspective they are still methods. Using the term also aids in clarity as it is a common form of reference as member function is not strict enough. You need to use the term non static member function. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Object-oriented_programming – Loki Astari Jul 16 '11 at 19:42
1  
@dragonwrenn: Yes you do. – Benjamin Lindley Jul 16 '11 at 20:06

Here's your problem: Your struct contains methods. That's no good in C.

In C++ a struct is mostly like a class (or rather, a class is mostly like a struct), and can have methods, etc.

In C, this does not apply.

share|improve this answer

You may use function pointers in struct to emulate OOP.

typedef struct demo
{
  int arr[20], i;
  void (*setvalue)(int num);

  void (*printvalue)();
} example;

then later you can assign a function to the function pointer.

void set_val(int num) {for(i=0;i<20;i++)arr[i]=num;}
example_struct.setvalue = set_val;
share|improve this answer

I would like to point out that C have function-pointers and function-pointers can be used like C++ member functions, kind of. The clunky syntax can be avoided with some C preprocessor macros and templates (you can use the C preprocessor for generic programming, it's more powerful and versatile then C++ templates, give better type checking and (on modern compilers) faster and smaller code; this programming trick used to be called Code Books by Algol and COBOL programmers (I learned it during a COBOL course in my youth), but have been avoided by C programmers for some stupid reason).

Code not tested, just cobbled it together from the code in the question:

# include <stdio.h>
static void _setvalue(example *obj, int num)
{ int i;
  for(i=0;i<20;i++)
      obj->arr[i]=num;
}

static void _printvalue(example *obj)
{  int i;
   for(i=0;i<20;i++)
       printf("%d ", obj->arr[i]);
}


typedef struct demo
{   int arr[20], i;
    void (*const setvalue)(example *, int) = _setvalue;
    void (*const printvalue)(example *)    = _printvalue;
} example;

int main()
{   example e;
    e.setvalue(&e, 100);
    e.printvalue(&e);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

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