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I'm working on a voting app, where the user can upload a list of email addresses for all of the voters. After doing some error checking, I create a Voter entity for each voter. Since there can be a large number of voters, I create the Voter entities in a taskqueue to avoid the 30 second limit and the task looks like this:

    put_list = []
    for email, id in itertools.izip(voter_emails, uuids):
        put_list.append(Voter(election = election,
                              email = email,
                              uuid = id))
    election.txt_voters = ""
    put_list.append(election)
    db.put(put_list)

This task, however, isn't idempotent. Is there a way to make this task idempotent? Or is there a better way to do this?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

use a key_name rather than a uuid property to prevent creating duplicate voter entities.

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I like this idea, but I'm concerned with the number of datastore calls. In the above code there is just one put. To use named keys, I think I'd have to call get_or_insert for a each voter (a very large number) plus the one put. Is it possible to do bulk operations with named keys? –  Kekito Jul 17 '11 at 12:28
1  
you should be able to use put() even with a key_name, and and the new instance will replace all of the properties on the old. It's not clear what you need the uuid's for at all. I would probably do this something like Voter(parent=election, key_name=email) –  IfLoop Jul 17 '11 at 15:21
    
@TokenMacGuy, using email as the key name is a good idea. I need the UUID to prevent voter fraud (UUID is sent to voter's email). I think I don't want the Voter to be in the same entity group as the Election but I'm going to ask another question about that. –  Kekito Jul 17 '11 at 23:49
    
@TokenMacGuy, actually I can't use the email as the key name since it isn't guaranteed to be unique (the same email could be used in two different elections). I guess I could prepend some kind of unique ID for the election. –  Kekito Jul 18 '11 at 0:21

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