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I have been googling so much on how to do this, but how would I reverse a NSString? Ex:hi would become: ih

I am looking for the easiest way to do this.

Thanks!

@Vince I made this method:

- (IBAction)doneKeyboard {

// first retrieve the text of textField1
NSString *myString = field1.text;
NSMutableString *reversedString = [NSMutableString string];
NSUInteger charIndex = 0;
while(myString && charIndex < [myString length]) {
    NSRange subStrRange = NSMakeRange(charIndex, 1);
    [reversedString appendString:[myString substringWithRange:subStrRange]];
    charIndex++;
}
// reversedString is reversed, or empty if myString was nil
field2.text = reversedString;
}

I hooked up that method to textfield1's didendonexit. When I click the done button, it doesn't reverse the text, the UILabel just shows the UITextField's text that I entered. What is wrong?

share|improve this question
    
the loop wasn(t first reversing anything. did you get the update ? –  user756245 Jul 17 '11 at 7:14

15 Answers 15

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Write a simple loop to do that:

// myString is "hi"
NSMutableString *reversedString = [NSMutableString string];
NSInteger charIndex = [myString length];
while (charIndex > 0) {
    charIndex--;
    NSRange subStrRange = NSMakeRange(charIndex, 1);
    [reversedString appendString:[myString substringWithRange:subStrRange]];
}
NSLog(@"%@", reversedString); // outputs "ih"

In your case:

// first retrieve the text of textField1
NSString *myString = textField1.text;
NSMutableString *reversedString = [NSMutableString string];
NSInteger charIndex = [myString length];
while (myString && charIndex > 0) {
    charIndex--;
    NSRange subStrRange = NSMakeRange(charIndex, 1);
    [reversedString appendString:[myString substringWithRange:subStrRange]];
}
// reversedString is reversed, or empty if myString was nil
textField2.text = reversedString;
share|improve this answer
    
what kind of loop? If I am taking the text of textfield #1 and putting it into textfield #2 how would I do that? –  iBrad Apps Jul 16 '11 at 21:25
1  
just a while, for, it's much a matter of preference. I'll update my answer. –  user756245 Jul 16 '11 at 21:29
1  
updated, mistake with the loop –  user756245 Jul 17 '11 at 6:48
2  
The system wouldn't allow me to edit it, but the charIndex >= 0 should be charIndex > 0, because >= allows charIndex to be -1 which will crash. –  iain Jul 19 '11 at 0:15
3  
-1: Broken for composed character sequences or surrogate pairs. Example: @"😂" or @"𝄞" –  Nikolai Ruhe Aug 12 '13 at 11:08

Google is your friend:

-(NSString *) reverseString
{
  NSMutableString *reversedStr;
  int len = [self length];

  // Auto released string
  reversedStr = [NSMutableString stringWithCapacity:len];     

  // Probably woefully inefficient...
  while (len > 0)
    [reversedStr appendString:
         [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%C", [self characterAtIndex:--len]]];   

  return reversedStr;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sane as others. Need to normalize first and handle RTL and BIDI –  uchuugaka Mar 4 at 5:00

Block version.

NSString *myString = @"abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";
NSMutableString *reversedString = [NSMutableString stringWithCapacity:[myString length]];

[myString enumerateSubstringsInRange:NSMakeRange(0,[myString length]) 
                           options:(NSStringEnumerationReverse | NSStringEnumerationByComposedCharacterSequences)
                        usingBlock:^(NSString *substring, NSRange substringRange, NSRange enclosingRange, BOOL *stop) {
                            [reversedString appendString:substring];
                        }];

// reversedString is now zyxwvutsrqponmlkjihgfedcba
share|improve this answer
3  
I like this one. Very elegant. –  Andy Ibanez Aug 4 '12 at 19:30
    
The __block modifier is not necessary here (reversedString is not modified in the block). –  Martin R Jan 21 '13 at 14:56
    
Fixed , thanks. –  Jano Jan 21 '13 at 15:07
    
I have written a category ove that one :D –  Enrico Bottani Jun 21 '13 at 14:24
3  
Wow, this is the only correct solution (including surrogate pairs and composed charcter sequences), so far. –  Nikolai Ruhe Aug 12 '13 at 11:19

Would it be faster if you only iterated over half the string swapping the characters at each end? So for a 5 character string, you swap characters 1 + 5, then 2 + 4 and 3 doesn't need swapped with anything.

NSMutableString *reversed = [original mutableCopyWithZone:NULL];
NSUInteger i, length;

length = [reversed length];

for (i = 0; i < length / 2; i++) {
    // Store the first character as we're going to replace with the character at the end
    // in the example, it would store 'h' 
    unichar startChar = [reversed characterAtIndex:i];

    // Only make the end range once
    NSRange endRange = NSMakeRange(length - i, 1);

    // Replace the first character ('h') with the last character ('i')
    // so reversed now contains "ii"
    [reversed replaceCharactersInRange:NSMakeRange(i, 1) 
                            withString:[reversed subStringWithRange:endRange];

    // Replace the last character ('i') with the stored first character ('h)
    // so reversed now contains "ih"
    [reversed replaceCharactersInRange:endRange
                            withString:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%c", startChar]];
}

edit ----

Having done some tests, the answer is No, its about 6 times slower than the version that loops over everything. The thing that slows us down is creating the temporary NSStrings for the replaceCharactersInRange:withString method. Here is a method that creates only one NSString by manipulating the character data directly and seems a lot faster in simple tests.

NSUInteger length = [string length];
unichar *data = malloc(sizeof (unichar) * length);
int i;

for (i = 0; i < length / 2; i++) {
    unichar startChar = [string characterAtIndex:i];
    unichar endChar = [string  characterAtIndex:(length - 1) - i];

    data[i] = endChar;
    data[(length - 1) - i] = startChar;
}

NSString *reversed = [NSString stringWithCharacters:data length:length];
free(data);
share|improve this answer
    
If it would be faster, would it be noticeable? –  iBrad Apps Jul 18 '11 at 21:07
    
For short strings probably not. The advantage this version has might be that reversed doesn't need to be expanded, but I imagine NSMutableString is quite efficient in that case. Only one way to find out I suppose –  iain Jul 18 '11 at 23:37
    
Yeah, so my version appears to be about 6 times slower than the other versions. –  iain Jul 18 '11 at 23:58

Add a category to NSString so you can call reverse on any NSString in the future like this:

#import "NSString+Reverse.h"

@implementation NSString (Reverse)
-(NSString*)reverse {
  char* cstring = (char*)[self UTF8String];
  int length = [self length]-1;

  int i=0;

  while (i<=length) {
    unichar tmp = cstring[i];
    cstring[i] = cstring[length];
    cstring[length] = tmp;
    i++;
    length--;
  }

  return [NSString stringWithCString:cstring encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];

}
@end
share|improve this answer
2  
-1: Mixing UTF-16 length and UTF8 characters only works for ASCII. –  Nikolai Ruhe Aug 12 '13 at 11:10

Reverse the string using recursion:

@implementation NSString (Reversed)

+ (NSString *)reversedStringFromString:(NSString *)string
{
    NSUInteger count = [string length];

    if (count <= 1) { // Base Case
        return string;
    } else {
        NSString *lastLetter = [string substringWithRange:NSMakeRange(count - 1, 1)];
        NSString *butLastLetter = [string substringToIndex:count - 1];
        return [lastLetter stringByAppendingString:[self reversedStringFromString:butLastLetter]];
    }
}

@end
share|improve this answer

I have written a category ove that one :D

//NSString+Reversed.h #import

//
//  NSString+Reversed.h
//  HTMLPageFormatter
//  Created by beit46 on 21.06.13.
//  

@interface NSString (Reversed)
- (NSString *)reversedString;
@end

//NSString+Reversed.m

//
//  NSString+Reversed.m
//  HTMLPageFormatter
//  Created by beit46 on 21.06.13.
#import "NSString+Reversed.h"

@implementation NSString (Reversed)
- (NSString *)reversedString {
    NSMutableString *reversedString = [NSMutableString stringWithCapacity:[self length]];

    [self enumerateSubstringsInRange:NSMakeRange(0,[self length])
                                 options:(NSStringEnumerationReverse | NSStringEnumerationByComposedCharacterSequences)
                              usingBlock:^(NSString *substring, NSRange substringRange, NSRange enclosingRange, BOOL *stop) {
                                  [reversedString appendString:substring];
                              }];
    return [reversedString copy];
}
@end
share|improve this answer
1  
-1 This does not add anything to the original from @Jano. Objective-C categories is not part of the question. –  Nikolai Ruhe Aug 12 '13 at 11:14
    
it was just to help the community, thanks for the useless down vote sheriff –  Enrico Bottani Sep 3 '13 at 15:05
1  
You posted an exact duplicate of Jano's answer. The only things you added yourself are: 1. wrapping the existing code into a category (which is off topic). 2. performing a needless copy on the result. I don't think that your answer helps the community—it just adds noise, so I downvoted. –  Nikolai Ruhe Sep 3 '13 at 15:40

None of the answers seem to consider multibyte characters so here is my sample code. It assumes you only ever pass in a string longer than one character.

- (void)testReverseString:(NSString *)string
{
    NSMutableString *rString = [NSMutableString new];
    NSInteger extractChar = [string length] - 1;
    while (extractChar >= 0)
    {
        NSRange oneCharPos = [string rangeOfComposedCharacterSequenceAtIndex:extractChar];
        for (NSUInteger add = 0; add < oneCharPos.length; ++ add)
        {
            unichar oneChar = [string characterAtIndex:oneCharPos.location + add];
            [rString appendFormat:@"%C", oneChar];
        }
        extractChar -= oneCharPos.length;
    }

    NSLog(@"%@ becomes %@", string, encryptedString );
}
share|improve this answer

I have two simple solutions for that purpose:

+(NSString*)reverseString:(NSString *)str
{
    NSMutableString* reversed = [NSMutableString stringWithCapacity:str.length];
    for (int i = (int)str.length-1; i >= 0; i--){
         [reversed appendFormat:@"%c", [str characterAtIndex:i]];
    }
    return reversed;
}

+(NSString*)reverseString2:(NSString *)str
{
    char* cstr = (char*)[str UTF8String];
    int len = (int)str.length;
    for (int i =  0; i < len/2; i++) {
        char buf = cstr[i];
        cstr[i] = cstr[len-i-1];
        cstr[len-i-1] = buf;
    }
    return [[NSString alloc] initWithBytes:cstr length:len encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];
}

Now, lets test it!

NSString* str = @"Objective-C is a general-purpose, object-oriented programming language that adds Smalltalk-style messaging to the C programming language";
NSLog(@"REV 1: %@", [Util reverseString:str]);
start = [NSDate date];
for (int i = 0 ; i < 1000; ++i)
    [Util reverseString:str];
end = [NSDate date];
NSLog(@"Time per 1000 repeats: %f", [end timeIntervalSinceDate:start]);

NSLog(@"REV 2: %@", [Util reverseString2:str]);
start = [NSDate date];
for (int i = 0 ; i < 1000; ++i)
    [Util reverseString2:str];
end = [NSDate date];
NSLog(@"Time per 1000 repeats: %f", [end timeIntervalSinceDate:start]);

Results:

ConsoleTestProject[68292:303] REV 1: egaugnal gnimmargorp C eht ot gnigassem elyts-klatllamS sdda taht egaugnal gnimmargorp detneiro-tcejbo ,esoprup-lareneg a si C-evitcejbO
ConsoleTestProject[68292:303] Time per 1000 repeats: 0.063880
ConsoleTestProject[68292:303] REV 2: egaugnal gnimmargorp C eht ot gnigassem elyts-klatllamS sdda taht egaugnal gnimmargorp detneiro-tcejbo ,esoprup-lareneg a si C-evitcejbO
ConsoleTestProject[68292:303] Time per 1000 repeats: 0.002038

And more chars result was:

ConsoleTestProject[68322:303] chars: 1982
ConsoleTestProject[68322:303] Time 1 per 1000 repeats: 1.014893
ConsoleTestProject[68322:303] Time 2 per 1000 repeats: 0.024928

The same text with above functions:

ConsoleTestProject[68366:303] Time 1 per 1000 repeats: 0.873574
ConsoleTestProject[68366:303] Time 2 per 1000 repeats: 0.019300
ConsoleTestProject[68366:303] Time 3 per 1000 repeats: 0.342735 <-Vladimir Gritsenko
ConsoleTestProject[68366:303] Time 4 per 1000 repeats: 0.584012 <- Jano

So, choose performance!

share|improve this answer
2  
-1: I choose correctness over performance. Examples: @"ä😂"; –  Nikolai Ruhe Aug 12 '13 at 11:17
    
@NikolaiRuhe use right encoding, it's just an example. –  HotJard Aug 12 '13 at 11:26
    
It's not about encoding. It's about characters/code points/code fragments that can't be torn apart. –  Nikolai Ruhe Aug 12 '13 at 11:28
    
@NikolaiRuhe the size of one char depends on it encoding, if u are using extra alphabet use ur own byte divider, but in generally idea of this method is faster than using objc. My aim was make short and fast solution for the purpose. If are choosing for correctness use first method, it quite short –  HotJard Aug 12 '13 at 11:35
1  
The first method is broken as well. Try to reverse @"😂". –  Nikolai Ruhe Aug 12 '13 at 11:49
str=@"india is my countery";
array1=[[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
for(int i =0 ;i<[str length]; i++) {
    NSString *singleCharacter  = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%c", [str characterAtIndex:i]];
    [array1 addObject:singleCharacter];
}


NSMutableString* theString = [NSMutableString string];

for (int i=[array1 count]-1; i>=0;i--){
    [theString appendFormat:@"%@",[array1 objectAtIndex:i]];
}
share|improve this answer
  • NSString into char utf32 (always 32 bits (unsigned int))
  • Reverse
  • char utf32 into NSString

+ (NSString *)reverseString3:(NSString *)str {
    unsigned int *cstr, buf, len = [str length], i;  
    cstr  = (unsigned int *)[str cStringUsingEncoding:NSUTF32LittleEndianStringEncoding];
    for (i=0;i < len/2;i++) buf = cstr[i], cstr[i] = cstr[len -i-1], cstr[len-i-1] = buf;
    return [[NSString alloc] initWithBytesNoCopy:cstr length:len*4 encoding:NSUTF32LittleEndianStringEncoding freeWhenDone:NO];
}

Example : Apple_is  --->  si_elppA

share|improve this answer

jano’s answer is correct. Unfortunately, it creates a lot of unnecessary temporary objects. Here is a much faster (more complicated) implementation that basically does the same thing, but uses memcpy and unichar buffers to keep memory allocations to a minimum.

- (NSString *)reversedString
{
    NSUInteger length = [self length];
    if (length < 2) {
        return self;
    }

    unichar *characters = calloc(length, sizeof(unichar));
    unichar *reversedCharacters = calloc(length, sizeof(unichar));
    if (!characters || !reversedCharacters) {
        free(characters);
        free(reversedCharacters);
        return nil;
    }

    [self getCharacters:characters range:NSMakeRange(0, length)];

    NSUInteger i = length - 1;
    NSUInteger copiedCharacterCount = 0;

    // Starting from the end of self, copy each composed character sequence into reversedCharacters
    while (copiedCharacterCount < length) {
        NSRange characterRange = [self rangeOfComposedCharacterSequenceAtIndex:i];
        memcpy(reversedCharacters + copiedCharacterCount, characters + characterRange.location, characterRange.length * sizeof(unichar));
        i = characterRange.location - 1;
        copiedCharacterCount += characterRange.length;
    }

    free(characters);

    NSString *reversedString = [[NSString alloc] initWithCharactersNoCopy:reversedCharacters length:length freeWhenDone:YES];
    if (!reversedString) {
        free(reversedCharacters);
    }

    return reversedString;
}

I tested this on 100,000 random multi-byte Unicode strings with lengths between 1 and 128. This version is about 4–5x faster than jano’s.

Enumerate substrings: 2.890528
MemCopy: 0.671090
Enumerate substrings: 2.840411
MemCopy: 0.662882

Test code is at https://gist.github.com/prachigauriar/9739805.

Update: I tried this again by simply converting to a UTF-32 buffer and reversing that.

- (NSString *)qlc_reversedStringWithUTF32Buffer
{
    NSUInteger length = [self length];
    if (length < 2) {
        return self;
    }

    NSStringEncoding encoding = NSHostByteOrder() == NS_BigEndian ? NSUTF32BigEndianStringEncoding : NSUTF32LittleEndianStringEncoding;
    NSUInteger utf32ByteCount = [self lengthOfBytesUsingEncoding:encoding];
    uint32_t *characters = malloc(utf32ByteCount);
    if (!characters) {
        return nil;
    }

    [self getBytes:characters maxLength:utf32ByteCount usedLength:NULL encoding:encoding options:0 range:NSMakeRange(0, length) remainingRange:NULL];

    NSUInteger utf32Length = utf32ByteCount / sizeof(uint32_t);
    NSUInteger halfwayPoint = utf32Length / 2;
    for (NSUInteger i = 0; i < halfwayPoint; ++i) {
        uint32_t character = characters[utf32Length - i - 1];
        characters[utf32Length - i - 1] = characters[i];
        characters[i] = character;
    }

    return [[NSString alloc] initWithBytesNoCopy:characters length:utf32ByteCount encoding:encoding freeWhenDone:YES];
}

This is about 3–4x times faster than the memcpy version. The aforementioned gist has been updated with the latest version of the code.

Enumerate substrings: 2.168705
MemCopy: 0.488320
UTF-32: 0.150822
Enumerate substrings: 2.169655
MemCopy: 0.481786
UTF-32: 0.147534
Enumerate substrings: 2.248812
MemCopy: 0.505995
UTF-32: 0.154531
share|improve this answer

Use method with any objects: NSString,NSNumber,etc..:

NSLog(@"%@",[self reverseObject:@12345]);
NSLog(@"%@",[self reverseObject:@"Hello World"]);

Method:

-(NSString*)reverseObject:(id)string{

string = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@",string];
NSMutableString *endString = [NSMutableString new];

while ([string length]!=[endString length]) {
    NSRange range = NSMakeRange([string length]-[endString length]-1, 1);
    [endString appendString: [string substringWithRange:range]];
}
return endString;}

Log:

2014-04-16 11:20:25.312 TEST[23733:60b] 54321
2014-04-16 11:20:25.313 TEST[23733:60b] dlroW olleH
share|improve this answer
NSMutableString *result = [NSMutableString stringWithString:@""];
    for (long i = self.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
        [result appendFormat:@"%c", [self characterAtIndex:i]];
    }
    return (NSString *)result;
share|improve this answer
    
Can you add some explanation as to what you've changed too? Is appendFormat really the best way to add a single char? (I don't know, but I'd be surprised) –  Rup Oct 8 at 16:26

I thought I'd throw another version out there in case anyone's interested.. personally, I like the cleaner approach using NSMutableString but if performance is the highest priority this one is faster:

- (NSString *)reverseString:(NSString *)input {
    NSUInteger len = [input length];
    unichar *buffer = malloc(len * sizeof(unichar));
    if (buffer == nil) return nil; // error!
    [input getCharacters:buffer];

    // reverse string; only need to loop through first half
    for (NSUInteger stPos=0, endPos=len-1; stPos < len/2; stPos++, endPos--) {
        unichar temp = buffer[stPos];
        buffer[stPos] = buffer[endPos];
        buffer[endPos] = temp;
    }

    return [[NSString alloc] initWithCharactersNoCopy:buffer length:len freeWhenDone:YES];
}

I also wrote a quick test as well to compare this with the more traditional NSMutableString method (which I also included below):

// test reversing a really large string
NSMutableString *string = [NSMutableString new];
for (int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++) {
    int digit = i % 10;
    [string appendFormat:@"%d", digit];
}
NSTimeInterval startTime = [[NSDate date] timeIntervalSince1970];
NSString *reverse = [self reverseString:string];
NSTimeInterval elapsedTime = [[NSDate date] timeIntervalSince1970] - startTime;
NSLog(@"reversed in %f secs", elapsedTime);

Results were:

  • using NSMutableString method (below) - "reversed in 3.720631 secs"

  • using unichar *buffer method (above) - "reversed in 0.032604 secs"

Just for reference, here's the NSMutableString method used for this comparison:

- (NSString *)reverseString:(NSString *)input {
    NSUInteger len = [input length];
    NSMutableString *result = [[NSMutableString alloc] initWithCapacity:len];
    for (int i = len - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
        [result appendFormat:@"%c", [input characterAtIndex:i]];
    }
    return result;
}

(NOTE: I don't have enough reputation points yet to vote or comment on answers so I'd appreciate if anyone could vote on this answer for me. I've been a long time reader but now want to start contributing more!)

share|improve this answer

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