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The subject really says my goal, but I'm stumped as to the implementation. I have a program that takes in different objects that extend my Randomizer class. I want to make it so that one can place a JAR file in the classpath and the program will search for it upon running it, and add it to the main program. This is what I tried, so far, but I stopped when I realized that a java.util.jar.JarFile can't give you Classes or Methods.

since it relies on it, I might as well mention that my class ArrayPP<T> is like ArrayList, but with alot more methods. Its addAll method, shown here, functions like its add method, but with multiple arguments or an array of objects of generic type T.

  private static Randomizer[] loadExternalRandomizers() throws IOException
  {
    java.io.File classPath = new java.io.File(System.getProperty("user.dir"));
    ArrayPP<Randomizer> r = new ArrayPP<>();
    if (classPath.isDirectory())
    {
      r.addAll(getRandomizersIn(classPath));
    }
    return r.toArray();
  }

  private static Randomizer[] getRandomizersIn(File dir) throws IOException
  {
    ArrayPP<Randomizer> r = new ArrayPP<>();
    java.io.File fs[] = dir.listFiles(new java.io.FileFilter() {

      @Override
      public boolean accept(File pathname)
      {
        return pathname.isDirectory() || pathname.toString().endsWith(".jar");
      }
    });
    java.util.jar.JarFile jr;
    java.util.Enumeration<java.util.jar.JarEntry> entries;
    java.util.jar.JarEntry thisEntry;
    for (java.io.File f : fs)
    {
      if (f.isDirectory())
      {
        r.addAll(getRandomizersIn(f));
        continue;
      }
      jr = new java.util.jar.JarFile(f);
      entries = jr.entries();
      while (entries.hasMoreElements())
      {
        thisEntry = entries.nextElement();
        //if (the jar file contains a class that extends Randomizer
        //  add that class to r
      }
    }
    return r.toArray();
  }

I'm building it on Java 7, if that helps. I'm also looking to do this without using any libraries.

Implementing a solution


I've tried implementing the solution described by Ryan Stewart, and it is shown below. I'm working it with a test JAR called BHR2 - Ranger.jar, which contains one class that extends Randomizer, called Ranger, in the package bhr2.plugins. The JAR contains, within its META-INF\services folder, one file called bhr2.plugins.Ranger with one line in it which reads bhr2.Randomizer # Abstract Randomizer.

  private static ArrayPP<Randomizer> loadExternalRandomizers() throws IOException, ClassNotFoundException, InstantiationException, IllegalAccessException
  {
    java.io.File classPath = new java.io.File(System.getProperty("user.dir"));
    ArrayPP<Randomizer> r = new ArrayPP<>();
    if (classPath.isDirectory())
    {
      r.addAll(getRandomizersIn(classPath));
    }
    return r;
  }

  private static int depth = 0;
  private static ArrayPP<Randomizer> getRandomizersIn(File dir) throws IOException, ClassNotFoundException, InstantiationException, IllegalAccessException
  {
    ArrayPP<Randomizer> r = new ArrayPP<>();
    java.io.File fs[] = dir.listFiles(new java.io.FileFilter() {

      @Override
      public boolean accept(File pathname)
      {
        return pathname.isDirectory() || pathname.toString().endsWith(".jar");
      }
    });
    for (java.io.File f : fs)
    {
      for (int i=0; i < depth; i++)
        System.out.print("  ");
      System.out.println(f);
      if (f.isDirectory())
      {
        if (depth < 4)
        {
          depth++;
          r.addAll(getRandomizersIn(f));
          depth--;
        }
        else
          System.out.println("Skipping directory due to depth");
        continue;
      }
        java.util.ServiceLoader<Randomizer> sl = ServiceLoader.loadInstalled(Randomizer.class);

        for (Randomizer rand : sl)
        {
          r.add(rand);
          System.out.println("adding " + rand);
        }
    }
    return r == null || r.isEmpty() ? new ArrayPP<Randomizer>() : r;
  }

But when I run it, this is all I get as an output before it starts doing other things:

I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\nbproject
  I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\nbproject\private
I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\src
  I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\src\bhr2
    I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\src\bhr2\resources
    I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\src\bhr2\randomizers
  I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\src\bht
    I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\src\bht\test
    I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\src\bht\tools
      I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\src\bht\tools\comps
        I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\src\bht\tools\comps\gameboard
Skipping directory due to depth
      I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\src\bht\tools\effects
      I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\src\bht\tools\misc
      I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\src\bht\tools\utilities
    I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\src\bht\resources
I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\lib
  I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\lib\CopyLibs
    I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\lib\CopyLibs\org-netbeans-modules-java-j2seproject-copylibstask.jar
  I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\lib\swing-layout
    I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\lib\swing-layout\swing-layout-1.0.4.jar
I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\BHR2 - Ranger
  I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\BHR2 - Ranger\META-INF
  I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\BHR2 - Ranger\bhr2
    I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\BHR2 - Ranger\bhr2\plugins
I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\build
  I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\build\classes
    I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\build\classes\bhr2
      I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\build\classes\bhr2\randomizers
      I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\build\classes\bhr2\resources
    I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\build\classes\bht
      I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\build\classes\bht\tools
        I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\build\classes\bht\tools\comps
Skipping directory due to depth
        I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\build\classes\bht\tools\utilities
Skipping directory due to depth
        I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\build\classes\bht\tools\effects
Skipping directory due to depth
        I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\build\classes\bht\tools\misc
Skipping directory due to depth
      I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\build\classes\bht\resources
      I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\build\classes\bht\test
    I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\build\classes\META-INF
  I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\build\empty
  I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\build\generated-sources
    I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\build\generated-sources\ap-source-output
I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\dist
  I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\dist\BHRandomizer2.jar
I:\Java\NetBeansProjects\BHRandomizer2\BHR2 - Ranger.jar
share|improve this question
    
you mixed up the file name/file content for the service loader stuff. the file name should be the base class, the file content should be the custom implementation. –  jtahlborn Aug 5 '11 at 14:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+50

Fetching the class list from the Manifest is of course the preferable solution. But if you don't expect the jars to contain such information, you can fall back to this:

  private static void scanClasses(File file) throws MalformedURLException, IOException {
    ClassLoader classLoader = new URLClassLoader(new URL[]{ file.toURI().toURL() });
    JarFile jar = new JarFile(file.getAbsoluteFile());
    Enumeration<JarEntry> jarEntries = jar.entries();
    while (jarEntries.hasMoreElements()) {
      JarEntry je = jarEntries.nextElement();
      if (je.getName().endsWith(".class")) {
        String clazzName = je.getName();
        clazzName = clazzName.substring(0, clazzName.length() - ".class".length()).replaceAll("/", ".");
        clazzName = clazzName.replaceAll("/", ".");
        try {
          Class clazz = Class.forName(clazzName, false, classLoader);
          if (Randomizer.class.isAssignableFrom(clazz)) {
            System.out.println("Found Randomizer: " + clazz);
          }
        } catch (ClassNotFoundException ex) {
          // this really should not happen, 
          // since we *know* the class exists
          throw new AssertionError(ex.getMessage());
        }
      }
    }
  }
share|improve this answer
    
code doesn't compile, but I fixed it up a bit... still, every time I run it, it gives me this error when it gets to the proper class: java.lang.ClassNotFoundException: bhr2/plugins/Ranger at java.lang.Class.forName0(Native Method) at java.lang.Class.forName(Class.java:264) at bhr2.Main.scanClasses(Main.java:186) –  Supuhstar Aug 9 '11 at 18:22
    
I wrote that from memory, but I know it worked for me. Maybe insert clazzName = clazzName.replaceAll("/", "."). –  Cephalopod Aug 10 '11 at 9:04
    
@Supuhstar: FYI, if you're going to be using this a lot, this solution is extremely slow. Using a ServiceLoader to find implementations across multiple jar files appears to be over 100 times faster than using this approach to scan even a single jar only 200K in size. –  Ryan Stewart Aug 13 '11 at 1:20
    
@Ryan then please, provide a sample of code just as short and ready to implement. –  Supuhstar Aug 16 '11 at 0:30
    
@Supuhstar: I gave you a complete, runnable project consisting of a service interface, three sample implementations and a main class showing how to load and use them. Check my answer again, as I've again added more information to it. –  Ryan Stewart Aug 16 '11 at 0:44

A typical solution to this problem is to build jar files that have a file in META-INF that tells your program what class(es) to load from that jar. Spring custom namespace handlers and JDBC drivers, for example, are loaded in this way.

Instead of figuring out how to actually scan all the classes in a jar, which nobody does, so I expect isn't possible/feasible, make your code look for a specific file in each jar on the classpath which lists the Randomizer implementations it contains. For instance, expect a file named META-INF/randomizers.list to have a list of class names, one per line, which are classes in that jar that implement your Randomizer. Read the file, and for each line, use Class.forName() to load the class by name, then newInstance() to instantiate it.

Edit: For loading your "list" file from everywhere in the classpath:

Enumeration<URL> resources = getClassLoader().getResources(
    "/META-INF/randomizers.list");
while (resources.hasMoreElements()) {
    URL url = resources.nextElement();
    // Load the Randomizer(s) specified in this file
}

Edit: So it turns out the JDK exposes the mechanism it uses for this kind of thing, which I didn't know about before. Just use a ServiceLoader. The docs explain how to use it, and I've coded up an example of how to use it, too. You can find the code on github or simply clone and run it yourself:

git clone git://github.com/zzantozz/testbed.git tmp
cd tmp
mvn install -pl serviceloader-example/service-usage -am
mvn -q exec:java -D exec.mainClass=rds.serviceloader.ServiceLoaderExample -pl serviceloader-example/service-usage

The example consists of five modules: one that defines a service interface, three that define separate service implementations, and one that loads the implementations using ServiceLoader. That last is called "service-usage" and demonstrates how to use the ServiceLoader class to load the three services defined in the other three modules/jars that implement the interface defined in the first module/jar.

Edit: Since you seem to be having trouble with the sample project, here are the basics.

  1. Each jar file that contains one or more Randomizer implementations should contain a file named META-INF/services/com.foo.Randomizer (where com.foo is your package name).
  2. This file should contain a list of class names, one per line, each of which is an implementation of Randomizer.
  3. With those files in place, all you have to do to get all the Randomizer instances is

    ServiceLoader<Randomizer> loader = ServiceLoader.load(Randomizer.class);
    for (Randomizer randomizer : loader) {
        randomizer.doWhatever();
    }
    
share|improve this answer
    
I'm.... not sure I follow... what do you mean? And how will I be able to see those classes from the code? –  Supuhstar Jul 16 '11 at 23:50
    
Updated the answer with more detail –  Ryan Stewart Jul 16 '11 at 23:59
    
I'll try this after my headache subsides >.< –  Supuhstar Jul 17 '11 at 0:16
    
see my most recent edit –  Supuhstar Jul 19 '11 at 5:34
    
@Supuhstar: You're going way far out of your way. You said you want to load these from jars on the classpath. Just use ClassLoader.getResources(). It'll do all the work for you. –  Ryan Stewart Jul 19 '11 at 14:37

Here here is the code I am using to retrieve all the classes belonging to a package and any sub-packages. You just need to search the list of returned classes for those implementing Randomizer using reflection.

/**
 * Scans all classes accessible from the context class loader which belong
 * to the given package and subpackages.
 * <p>
 * Inspired from post on: {@code http://snippets.dzone.com/posts/show/4831}
 */
public static List<Class<?>> getClasses(String packageName)
        throws ClassNotFoundException, IOException {

    // Retrieving current class loader
    final ClassLoader classLoader
            = Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader();

    // Computing path from the package name
    final String path = packageName.replace('.', '/');

    // Retrieving all accessible resources
    final Enumeration<URL> resources = classLoader.getResources(path);
    final List<File> dirs = new ArrayList<File>();

    while (resources.hasMoreElements()) {
        final URL resource = resources.nextElement();
        final String fileName = resource.getFile();
        final String fileNameDecoded = URLDecoder.decode(fileName, "UTF-8");
        dirs.add(new File(fileNameDecoded));
    }

    // Preparing result
    final ArrayList<Class<?>> classes = new ArrayList<Class<?>>();

    // Processing each resource recursively
    for (File directory : dirs) {
        classes.addAll(findClasses(directory, packageName));
    }

    // Returning result
    return classes;

}

/**
 * Recursive method used to find all classes in a given directory and
 * subdirs.
 */
public static List<Class<?>> findClasses(File directory, String packageName)
        throws ClassNotFoundException {

    // Preparing result
    final List<Class<?>> classes = new ArrayList<Class<?>>();

    if ( directory == null )
        return classes;

    if (!directory.exists())
        return classes;

    // Retrieving the files in the directory
    final File[] files = directory.listFiles();

    for (File file : files) {

        final String fileName = file.getName();

        // Do we need to go recursive?
        if (file.isDirectory()) {

            classes.addAll(findClasses(file, packageName + "." + fileName));

        } else if (fileName.endsWith(".class") && !fileName.contains("$")) {

            Class<?> _class;

                _class = Class.forName(packageName + '.'
                        + fileName.substring(0, fileName.length() - 6));

            classes.add(_class);

        }

    }

    return classes;

}
share|improve this answer
    
thank you for your answer, but it seems Arian's is more simple. –  Supuhstar Aug 11 '11 at 3:33
    
Yes, but it does not go through all jar files as requested in your question. –  JVerstry Aug 11 '11 at 12:14
    
I'm sorry if that's what my question seemed to imply. What I want the program to do is seek out ALL classes that extend Randomizer, whether in plain sight, or hidden within a JAR –  Supuhstar Aug 12 '11 at 15:21

I think you should stick with the java ServiceLoader. Then you don't need to fiddle with jars yourself. Here's a good tutorial: http://java.sun.com/developer/technicalArticles/javase/extensible/index.html

If your developing an extensible desktop application the netbeans platform might be the right solution for you. It has a higher learning curve but it is quite worth it. http://netbeans.org/features/platform/index.html

share|improve this answer

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