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If you have something like the code below, it is impossible to access any node type below the head tag. I am guessing the reason is the JavaScript code executed before the rest of the document was created. But is there a way to access these nodes from the head tag. I want to access them from the head tag because I like my JavaScript code to be in one location if possible. I know jquery uses $(document).ready(). Is there something similar to that?

    <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<script type="text/javascript">
var div  = document.getElementById('myDiv')
alert(div)
</script>

<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
<title>Untitled Document</title>
</head>

<body>
<div id='myDiv'></div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this question

The simplest analog to jQuery's $(document).ready() is window.onload:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<script type="text/javascript">
window.onload = function(){
    var div  = document.getElementById('myDiv')
    alert(div)
}
</script>

<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
<title>Untitled Document</title>
</head>

<body>
<div id='myDiv'></div>
</body>
</html>

It is not as good because it will wait until all images are downloaded before it fires. If you must have the equivalent, you could use a microlib such as this one.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, for the link... way more thorough than the sample code i provided. – prodigitalson Jul 17 '11 at 3:23

"I like my JavaScript code to be in one location if possible"

Yes: An external js file. It is bad practice to write js in the head. In the same way that writing styles in the head is poor. Hopefully you are using jquery for more than just the ready event, but it is an invaluable initializer even if you aren't. Write your js in a separate file, hopefully in some type of a container so you don't clutter the global namespace, and initialize it with $(document).ready();

share|improve this answer
    
"It is bad practice to write js in the head". Why? "In the same way that writing styles in the head is poor". Why? – RobG Jul 17 '11 at 4:40
    
@RobG: one reason is performance (external resources can be cached more aggressively) developer.yahoo.com/performance/rules.html#external perfectionkills.com/optimizing-html , another one is that a few smaller files are often easier to maintain than a single gigantic HTML. – Nickolay Jul 17 '11 at 9:56
    
@RobG - Separation of Concerns: the evolution of the MVC architecture as applied to web development. It states that markup should be separated from presentation and again from behavior. Its important for several reasons, notably: upkeep and maintenance, readability (avoidance of spaghetti code), and overall optimization. This is especially true as CSS and javascript complexity grows with current web trends. Don't agree? try it! Build a giant site with inline styles and logic, and then make ongoing updates - its painful at best (speaking from experience, here) – Bosworth99 Jul 17 '11 at 16:54
1  
Good. Providing reasons for why something is better carries much more weight. – RobG Jul 18 '11 at 13:07
    
You're totally right. That answer had no reasoning. I blame the tequila ;) – Bosworth99 Jul 18 '11 at 19:09

You must wait for the 'onload' DOM event. jquery $(document).ready() is a wrapper for setting event handlers for onload.

Without jQuery you might try:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<script type="text/javascript">
function do_onload() {
    var div  = document.getElementById('myDiv')
    alert(div)
}
</script>

<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
<title>Untitled Document</title>
</head>

<body onload='do_onload()'>
<div id='myDiv'>I am here</div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
1  
No its not. onLoad is different than ready. Onload means the entire document is loaded. onready means that the dom is ready but not necessarily that resources have been loaded. I.E. onready happens before the native onload. – prodigitalson Jul 17 '11 at 2:03
    
The body's load event is a reasonable option in fast loading pages. Not so good though if the page loads slowly so load doesn't fire until after content is visible and interactive. – RobG Jul 17 '11 at 4:44
    
@prodigitalson Hey! you are right for recent browsers. jQuery source for bindReady sets both DOMContentLoaded and load. Thanks. – Magicianeer Jul 17 '11 at 20:43

Well as a general rule i tend to put all inline js at the end of the document anyway, only externals do i usually put in the head. However, you can use the same methods jquery uses. I dunno exactly what the jq source looks like but something like this should work (untested):

window.onDomReady = function (fn) {
    if(document.addEventListener) {
      document.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded", func, false);
    } else {
      document.onreadystatechange = function(func){
        if(document.readyState == "interactive") {
          fn(func);
        }
      }
    }
  };

And then you would use it like:

window.onDomReady(function(){
   // do your stuff
});

I dunno if thats completely cross browser compatible either... that would be on of the benefits of using something like jQuery instead of writing your own.

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