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for (String stock : allStocks) {

    Quote quote = getQuote(...);
    if (null == quoteLast) {
        continue;
    }

    Price price = quote.getPrice();
    if (null == price) {
        continue;
    }

}

I don't necessarily need a line by line translation, but I'm looking for the "Scala way" to handle this type of problem.

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1  
Do you have control over the signature of getQuote and getPrice? if so you could have them return Option[Quote] and Option[Price]. –  huynhjl Jul 17 '11 at 2:51
    
The rest of your for "loop" is missing. It currently does nothing. –  ziggystar Jul 17 '11 at 18:28
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5 Answers

up vote 23 down vote accepted

You don't need continue or breakable or anything like that in cases like this: Options and for comprehensions do the trick very nicely,

val stocksWithPrices =
  for {
    stock <- allStocks
    quote <- Option(getQuote(...))
    price <- Option(quote.getPrice())
  } yield (stock, quote, price);
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Generally you try to avoid those situations to begin with by filtering before you even start:

val goodStocks = allStocks.view.
  map(stock => (stock, stock.getQuote)).filter(_._2 != null).
  map { case (stock, quote) => (stock,quote, quote.getPrice) }.filter(_._3 != null)

(this example showing how you'd carry along partial results if you need them). I've used a view so that results will be computed as-needed, instead of creating a bunch of new collections at each step.

Actually, you'd probably have the quotes and such return options--look around on StackOverflow for examples of how to use those instead of null return values.

But, anyway, if that sort of thing doesn't work so well (e.g. because you are generating too many intermediate results that you need to keep, or you are relying on updating mutable variables and you want to keep the evaluation pattern simple so you know what's happening when) and you can't conceive of the problem in a different, possibly more robust way, then you can

import scala.util.control.Breaks._
for (stock <- allStocks) {
  breakable {
    val quote = getQuote(...)
    if (quoteLast eq null) break;
    ...
  }
}

The breakable construct specifies where breaks should take you to. If you put breakable outside a for loop, it works like a standard Java-style break. If you put it inside, it acts like continue.

Of course, if you have a very small number of conditions, you don't need the continue at all; just use the else of the if-statement.

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Would this mean that getQuote has to be called twice for all the valid matches? –  deltanovember Jul 17 '11 at 2:52
    
@deltanovember - Do you see any repeats of getQuote in my example code? The value is stored; that's why there's a map first and then a filter. –  Rex Kerr Jul 17 '11 at 3:23
2  
Your filter is really much more complicated than necessary, and there's absolutely no need to use breakable in the for comprehension version. –  Miles Sabin Jul 17 '11 at 9:17
    
@Miles Sabin - Granted for this particular example, but I was assuming that return values being null was not the only case one would use a continue. So I wanted to show methods that would work regardless of whether it's x==null or length==0 or whatever. –  Rex Kerr Jul 17 '11 at 17:10
    
Breakable uses exceptions to implement this kind of control flow, right? –  Ken Bloom Jul 17 '11 at 22:57
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Your control structure here can be mapped very idiomatically into the following for loop, and your code demonstrates the kind of filtering that Scala's for loop was designed for.

for {stock <- allStocks.view
     quote = getQuote(...)
     if quoteLast != null
     price = quote.getPrice
     if null != price
    }{
      // whatever comes after all of the null tests
    }

By the way, Scala will automatically desugar this into the code from Rex Kerr's solution

val goodStocks = allStocks.view.
  map(stock => (stock, stock.getQuote)).filter(_._2 != null).
  map { case (stock, quote) => (stock,quote, quote.getPrice) }.filter(_._3 != null)

This solution probably doesn't work in general for all different kinds of more complex flows that might use continue, but it does address a lot of common ones.

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Option's companion object's apply method will do the null check for you: replace the explicit null check in your variant with Option(<thing which might be null>) and you'll end up with mine. –  Miles Sabin Jul 17 '11 at 10:23
    
@Miles: that's certainly correct, but it doesn't show off the if filters that the questioner probably wants to know about, and you have to explain what the Option constructor does. –  Ken Bloom Jul 17 '11 at 22:41
    
I'm not so sure ... it looks to me like he has a classic instance of a problem which has a nicer monadic solution than one involving conditionals. Yes, there were conditionals in the question, but the implications was that the questioner didn't think the usage was idiomatic ... and I agree ;-) –  Miles Sabin Jul 18 '11 at 7:53
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If the focus is really on the continue and not on the null handling, just define an inner method (the null handling part is a different idiom in scala):

def handleStock(stock: String): Unit {
  val quote = getQuote(...)
  if (null == quoteLast) {
    return
  }

  val price = quote.getPrice();
  if (null == price) {
    return
  }
}

for (stock <- allStocks) {
  handleStock(stock)
}
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The simplest way is to embed the skipped-over code in an if with reversed-sense to what you have.

See http://www.scala-lang.org/node/257

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