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Is there a work around on how to create a constructor for static class?

I need some data to be loaded when class is initialized but I need only and only one object.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 54 down vote accepted

C# has a static constructor for this purpose.

static class YourClass
{
    static YourClass()
    {
        // perform initialization here
    }
}
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Note that there's no requirement that YourClass be static. –  dlev Jul 17 '11 at 4:10
9  
To be fair, the original poster did specifically ask about a constructor for a static class. –  Jared S Jul 17 '11 at 4:14
    
Fair point, indeed. –  dlev Jul 17 '11 at 4:15
    
I believe I tried this and I got an exception. I'll try again, cuz I might be thinking of something else. –  jM2.me Jul 17 '11 at 4:17
    
What sort of exception did you receive? –  lysergic-acid Jul 17 '11 at 4:19
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A static constructor looks like this

static class Foo
{
    static Foo()
    {
         // Static initialization code here
    }
}

It is executed only once when the type is first used. All classes can have static constructors, not just static classes.

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NOTE: public static class Foo { static Foo() { // Static initialization code here } } // Look much prettier in the editor –  Barton Sep 19 '13 at 18:37
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You can use the Singleton pattern to fulfill your requirement. Please find the implementation code here.

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This will retrun only one instance of your class –  Prabhakantha Jul 17 '11 at 8:06
    
Singleton classes shouldn't have parametered constructors: csharpindepth.com/Articles/General/Singleton.aspx#introduction –  GrandMasterFlush Dec 4 '13 at 14:27
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