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I've been using argparse for a Python program that can -prepare, -upload or both:

parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(description='Log archiver arguments.')
parser.add_argument('-process', action='store_true')
parser.add_argument('-upload',  action='store_true')
args = parser.parse_args()

The program is meaningless without at least one parameter. How can I configure argparse to force at least one parameter to be chosen?

UPDATE:

Following the comments: What's the Pythonic way to parametrize a program with at least one option?

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7  
-x is universally a flag and optional. Cut the - if it's required. –  delnan Jul 17 '11 at 9:27
    
Couldn't you make process the default behavior (without the need to specify any options) and allow the user to change that into upload if that option is set? Usually, options should be optional, hence the name. Required options should be avoided (this is also in the argparse docs). –  Tim Pietzcker Jul 17 '11 at 9:32
    
@AdamMatan It is almost three years since you have asked your question but I liked the challenge hidden in it and used the advantage of new solutions being available for this kind of tasks. –  Jan Vlcinsky Jun 9 at 21:21

7 Answers 7

up vote 22 down vote accepted
if not (args.process or args.upload):
    parser.error('No action requested, add -process or -upload')
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That's probably the only way, if argparse has no built-in option for this. –  Adam Matan Jul 17 '11 at 10:29
    
Well done, Mr. Hagemeister ;) –  Sven Hager May 28 at 18:09

If not the 'or both' part (I have initially missed this) you could use something like this:

parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(description='Log archiver arguments.')
parser.add_argument('--process', action='store_const', const='process', dest='mode')
parser.add_argument('--upload',  action='store_const', const='upload', dest='mode')
args = parser.parse_args()
if not args.mode:
    parser.error("One of --process or --upload must be given")

Though, probably it would be a better idea to use subcommands instead.

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2  
I think he wants to allow --process OR --upload, not XOR. This prevents both options from being set at the same time. –  phihag Jul 17 '11 at 9:54
    
+1 because you mentioned subcommands. Yet - as somebody pointed in the comments -x and --xxx are typically optional parameters. –  mac Jul 17 '11 at 9:56
    
@phihag: you are right, I misread the question. –  Jacek Konieczny Jul 17 '11 at 9:57
args = vars(parser.parse_args())
if not any(args.values()):
    parser.error('No arguments provided.')
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+1 for a generalized solution. Also like the use of vars(), which is also useful for passing carefully-named options to a constructor with **. –  Lenna Mar 10 '13 at 14:57
    
Which is exactly what I'm doing with it. Thanks! –  brentlance Mar 11 '13 at 18:14
    
Dang, I like that vars. I just did .__dict__ and felt dumb before. –  Theo Belaire Feb 13 at 18:27

If you require a python program to run with at least one parameter, add an argument that doesn't have the option prefix (- or -- by default) and set nargs=+ (Minimum of one argument required). The problem with this method I found is that if you do not specify the argument, argparse will generate a "too few arguments" error and not print out the help menu. If you don't need that functionality, here's how to do it in code:

import argparse

parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(description='Your program description')
parser.add_argument('command', nargs="+", help='describe what a command is')
args = parser.parse_args()

I think that when you add an argument with the option prefixes, nargs governs the entire argument parser and not just the option. (What I mean is, if you have an --option flag with nargs="+", then --option flag expects at least one argument. If you have option with nargs="+", it expects at least one argument overall.)

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You could add choices=['process','upload'] to that argument. –  hpaulj Jun 10 at 19:11

Requirements Review

  • use argparse (I will ignore this one)
  • allow one or two actions to be called (at least one required).
  • try to by Pythonic (I would rather call it "POSIX"-like)

There are also some implicit requirements when living on command line:

  • explain the usage to the user in a way which is easy to understand
  • options shall be optional
  • allow specifying flags and options
  • allow combining with other parameters (like file name or names).

Sample solution using docopt (file managelog.py):

"""Manage logfiles
Usage:
    managelog.py [options] process -- <logfile>...
    managelog.py [options] upload -- <logfile>...
    managelog.py [options] process upload -- <logfile>...
    managelog.py -h

Options:
    -V, --verbose      Be verbose
    -U, --user <user>  Username
    -P, --pswd <pswd>  Password

Manage log file by processing and/or uploading it.
If upload requires authentication, you shall specify <user> and <password>
"""
if __name__ == "__main__":
    from docopt import docopt
    args = docopt(__doc__)
    print args

Try to run it:

$ python managelog.py
Usage:
    managelog.py [options] process -- <logfile>...
    managelog.py [options] upload -- <logfile>...
    managelog.py [options] process upload -- <logfile>...
    managelog.py -h

Show the help:

$ python managelog.py -h
Manage logfiles
Usage:
    managelog.py [options] process -- <logfile>...
    managelog.py [options] upload -- <logfile>...
    managelog.py [options] process upload -- <logfile>...
    managelog.py -h

Options:
    -V, --verbose      Be verbose
    -U, --user <user>  Username
    -P, --pswd <pswd>  P    managelog.py [options] upload -- <logfile>...

Manage log file by processing and/or uploading it.
If upload requires authentication, you shall specify <user> and <password>

And use it:

$ python managelog.py -V -U user -P secret upload -- alfa.log beta.log
{'--': True,
 '--pswd': 'secret',
 '--user': 'user',
 '--verbose': True,
 '-h': False,
 '<logfile>': ['alfa.log', 'beta.log'],
 'process': False,
 'upload': True}

Short alternative short.py

There can be even shorter variant:

"""Manage logfiles
Usage:
    short.py [options] (process|upload)... -- <logfile>...
    short.py -h

Options:
    -V, --verbose      Be verbose
    -U, --user <user>  Username
    -P, --pswd <pswd>  Password

Manage log file by processing and/or uploading it.
If upload requires authentication, you shall specify <user> and <password>
"""
if __name__ == "__main__":
    from docopt import docopt
    args = docopt(__doc__)
    print args

Usage looks like this:

$ python short.py -V process upload  -- alfa.log beta.log
{'--': True,
 '--pswd': None,
 '--user': None,
 '--verbose': True,
 '-h': False,
 '<logfile>': ['alfa.log', 'beta.log'],
 'process': 1,
 'upload': 1}

Note, that instead of boolean values for "process" and "upload" keys there are counters.

It turns out, we cannot prevent duplication of these words:

$ python short.py -V process process upload  -- alfa.log beta.log
{'--': True,
 '--pswd': None,
 '--user': None,
 '--verbose': True,
 '-h': False,
 '<logfile>': ['alfa.log', 'beta.log'],
 'process': 2,
 'upload': 1}

Conclusions

Designing good command line interface can be challenging sometime.

There are multiple aspects of command line based program:

  • good design of command line
  • selecting/using proper parser

argparse offers a lot, but restricts possible scenarios and can become very complex.

With docopt things go much shorter while preserving readability and offering high degree of flexibility. If you manage getting parsed arguments from dictionary and do some of conversions (to integer, opening files..) manually (or by other library called schema), you may find docopt good fit for command line parsing.

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Use append_const to a list of actions and then check that the list is populated:

parser.add_argument('-process', dest=actions, const="process", action='append_const')
parser.add_argument('-upload',  dest=actions, const="upload", action='append_const')

args = parser.parse_args()

if(args.actions == None):
    parser.error('Error: No actions requested')

You can even specify the methods directly within the constants.

def upload:
    ...

parser.add_argument('-upload',  dest=actions, const=upload, action='append_const')
args = parser.parse_args()

if(args.actions == None):
    parser.error('Error: No actions requested')

else:
    for action in args.actions:
        action()
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For http://bugs.python.org/issue11588 I am exploring ways of generalizing the mutually_exclusive_group concept to handle cases like this.

With this development argparse.py, https://github.com/hpaulj/argparse_issues/blob/nested/argparse.py I am able to write:

parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(prog='PROG', 
    description='Log archiver arguments.')
group = parser.add_usage_group(kind='any', required=True,
    title='possible actions (at least one is required)')
group.add_argument('-p', '--process', action='store_true')
group.add_argument('-u', '--upload',  action='store_true')
args = parser.parse_args()
print(args)

which produces the following help:

usage: PROG [-h] (-p | -u)

Log archiver arguments.

optional arguments:
  -h, --help     show this help message and exit

possible actions (at least one is required):
  -p, --process
  -u, --upload

This accepts inputs like '-u', '-up', '--proc --up' etc.

It ends up running a test similar to http://stackoverflow.com/a/6723066/901925, though the error message needs to be clearer:

usage: PROG [-h] (-p | -u)
PROG: error: some of the arguments process upload is required

I wonder:

  • are the parameters kind='any', required=True clear enough (accept any of the group; at least one is required)?

  • is usage (-p | -u) clear? A required mutually_exclusive_group produces the same thing. Is there some alternative notation?

  • is using a group like this more intuitive than phihag's simple test?

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