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I just started learning ASM, I have C experience but I guess it doesn't matter. Anyway how can I initialize a 12 elements array of DT to 0s, and how not to initialize it?

I use FASM.

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The language is called "assembly" and the piece of system software that turns it into an executable is called an "assembler". –  Sparafusile Jul 26 '11 at 18:25

2 Answers 2

Just use the reserve data directive and reserve 12 tbytes:

array:          rt 12
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well then I would have to reserve 10x12 bytes right? dt is 10 bytes. –  adad Jul 17 '11 at 11:07
    
yes, if you want to reserve bytes instead: array: rb 12*10 –  Jens Björnhager Jul 17 '11 at 11:17
    
And then can I normally reffer to that bytes like that :mov eax, [array+10](second element)? –  adad Jul 17 '11 at 11:27
    
Yes, but as you are working with tbytes perhaps you meant something like fld tbyte [array+10]? –  Jens Björnhager Jul 17 '11 at 11:32
    
Why is that? I just started learnign some things are still blur to me. –  adad Jul 17 '11 at 11:34

Since arrays are just a contiguous chunk of memory with elements one after the other, you can do something like this in NASM (not sure if FASM supports the times directive, but you could try):

my_array:
    times 12 dt 0.0

That is expanded out when your source is assembled to:

my_array:
    dt 0.0
    dt 0.0
    dt 0.0
    dt 0.0
    dt 0.0
    dt 0.0
    dt 0.0
    dt 0.0
    dt 0.0
    dt 0.0
    dt 0.0
    dt 0.0
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I tried that and I get invalid operand when I do it with times syntax. –  adad Jul 17 '11 at 10:44
    
Oh, yeah it supports times directive but i don't know why I can't use it with dt variable x_x –  adad Jul 17 '11 at 11:07
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You can't initialize tbytes to integers, only to floats: times 12 dt 0.0 –  Jens Björnhager Jul 19 '11 at 10:23

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