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I've a class that contains a static collection to store the logged-in users in an ASP.NET MVC application. I just want to know about the below code is thread-safe or not. Do I need to lock the code whenever I add or remove item to the onlineUsers collection.

public class OnlineUsers
{
    private static List<string> onlineUsers = new List<string>();
    public static EventHandler<string> OnUserAdded;
    public static EventHandler<string> OnUserRemoved;

    private OnlineUsers()
    {
    }

    static OnlineUsers()
    {
    }

    public static int NoOfOnlineUsers
    {
        get
        {
            return onlineUsers.Count;
        }
    }

    public static List<string> GetUsers()
    {
        return onlineUsers;
    }

    public static void AddUser(string userName)
    {
        if (!onlineUsers.Contains(userName))
        {
            onlineUsers.Add(userName);

            if (OnUserAdded != null)
                OnUserAdded(null, userName);
        }
    }

    public static void RemoveUser(string userName)
    {
        if (onlineUsers.Contains(userName))
        {
            onlineUsers.Remove(userName);

            if (OnUserRemoved != null)
                OnUserRemoved(null, userName);
        }
    }
}
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1  
btw - none of that code is async... question title is confusing –  Marc Gravell Jul 17 '11 at 10:39
    
I would argue that those members shouldn't be static. What was your reasoning behind it? –  luketorjussen Jul 17 '11 at 11:46
    
@Marc, you are correct. Asynchronous has nothing to do with this. I got little messed up when I typed the question :) –  Mark Jul 18 '11 at 6:02

6 Answers 6

up vote 12 down vote accepted

That is absolutely not thread safe. Any time 2 threads are doing something (very common in a web application), chaos is possible - exceptions, or silent data loss.

Yes you need some kind of synchronization such as lock; and static is usually a very bad idea for data storage, IMO (unless treated very carefully and limited to things like configuration data).

Also - static events are notorious for a good way to keep object graphs alive unexpectedly. Treat those with caution too; if you subscribe once only, fine - but don't subscribe etc per request.

Also - it isn't just locking the operations, since this line:

return onlineUsers;

returns your list, now unprotected. all access to an item must be synchronized. Personally I'd return a copy, i.e.

lock(syncObj) {
    return onlineUsers.ToArray();
}

Finally, returning a .Count from such can be confusing - as it is not guaranteed to still be Count at any point. It is informational at that point in time only.

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I know you get this a lot, but great answer! –  John Buchanan Jul 17 '11 at 10:44
3  
Your point about "Count" being unreliable is perhaps the most important and frequently misunderstood aspect of multithreaded programming of mutable types. Normally the way you reason about code in single threaded life is that memory is stable unless you do work to mutate it. In multithreaded code, the opposite is true: you have to assume that everything is constantly changing unless you are doing work to keep it stable. When you observe the size of a collection you are observing the size it was in the past. It might have mutated a million times immediatly after you counted it. –  Eric Lippert Jul 17 '11 at 15:31
    
@Eric the one I think is subtle is accidentally exposing the list, now completely unprotected, naked, and vulnerable to assault. –  Marc Gravell Jul 17 '11 at 16:50
    
@Marc I agree with John you gave a great answer. I don't understand why static events are not good. Can you point out some links or references to know more. –  Mark Jul 18 '11 at 6:27
1  
@Mark treated carefully they are fine; but if you subscribe from a transient object (that lives a very short time), but forget to unsubscribe, you will keep that object alive forever. It will cause memory growth over time as you repeat that process, and will make invoking it progressively slower and slower. –  Marc Gravell Jul 18 '11 at 6:30

Yes, you need to lock the onlineUsers to make that code threadsafe.

A few notes:

  • Using a HashSet<string> instead of the List<string> may be a good idea, since it is much more efficient for operations like this (Contains and Remove especially). This does not change anything on the locking requirements though.

  • You can declare a class as "static" if it has only static members.

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He could make it a static class, but IMO these members should not be static in the first place. –  CodesInChaos Jul 17 '11 at 10:49
    
@CodeInChaos, that's right of course. But since the Op is obviously a newbie I didn't want to write a "you're doing it all wrong" kind of answer. Suitable techniques to replace the static class here may be a bit complicated for the Op to follow. –  Lucero Jul 17 '11 at 10:53
    
@CodeInChaos Can you please tell me why those members should not be marked static. I just want to correct my mistakes. –  Mark Jul 18 '11 at 6:07
    
@Lucero Is a single lock object is enough to lock the collection in all the places? –  Mark Jul 18 '11 at 6:23
    
@Mark, with the exception of the GetUsers class a single lock is good enough. As written by others, you should not return the original instance in GetUsers, otherwise you'll not be able to control what is done on that reference. –  Lucero Jul 18 '11 at 8:07

Yes you do need to lock your code.

 object padlock = new object
 public bool Contains(T item)
 {
    lock (padlock)
    {
        return items.Contains(item);
    }
 }
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Yes. You need to lock the collection before you read or write to the collection, since multiple users are potentially being added from different threadpool workers. You should probably also do it on the count as well, though if you're not concerned with 100% accuracy that may not be an issue.

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As per Lucero's answer, you need to lock onlineUsers. Also be careful what will clients of your class do with the onlineUsers returned from GetUsers(). I suggest you change your interface - for example use IEnumerable<string> GetUsers() and make sure the lock is used in its implementation. Something like this:

public static IEnumerable<string> GetUsers() {
    lock (...) {
        foreach (var element in onlineUsers)
            yield return element;
        // We need foreach, just "return onlineUsers" would release the lock too early!
    }
}

Note that this implementation can expose you to deadlocks if users try to call some other method of OnlineUsers that uses lock, while still iterating over the result of GetUsers().

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1  
That will cause blocking, not typically deadlocks (unless there is a second resource in play) - but personally I would avoid this scenario - returning a copy of the data is usually very cheap and avoids the huge risks associated with this approach. In particular, I can foresee something like foreach(var user user in GetUsers()) DoSomethingExpensive(user) which would block all other access for an unpredictable (but too long) amount of time. Best avoided, IMO. –  Marc Gravell Jul 17 '11 at 10:50
    
@Marc Agreed, but that depends on concrete usage scenario. If there are few users and the list is frequently modified, the copy is is probably better. If there are many users and the list is fairly static (AND there is no DoSomethingExpensive() from your example), my solution is probably better. As always "it depends"TM ;) –  Branko Dimitrijevic Jul 17 '11 at 11:08
    
Re the deleted comment re deadlock; no that wouldn't deadlock - locks are re-entrant. And yes, you do need a lock on .Count –  Marc Gravell Jul 17 '11 at 11:20
    
@Marc If the thread iterating through GetUsers() tries to wait on another thread that then tries to acquire a lock on the list, this would cause a deadlock. –  Branko Dimitrijevic Jul 17 '11 at 11:32
    
waiting on the thread - I'd call that a resource :) but yes, that would deadlock. So if that is a real risk - don't expose data like this :) –  Marc Gravell Jul 17 '11 at 11:34

That code it is not thread-safe per se.

I will not make any suggestions relative to your "design", since you didn't ask any. I'll assume you found good reasons for those static members and exposing your list's contents as you did.

However, if you want to make your code thread-safe, you should basically use a lock object to lock on, and wrap the contents of your methods with a lock statement:

    private readonly object syncObject = new object();

    void SomeMethod()
    {
        lock (this.syncObject)
        {
            // Work with your list here
        }
    }

Beware that those events being raised have the potential to hold the lock for an extended period of time, depending on what the delegates do. You could omit the lock from the NoOfOnlineUsers property while declaring your list as volatile. However, if you want the Count value to persist for as long as you are using it at a certain moment, use a lock there, as well.

As others suggested here, exposing your list directly, even with a lock, will still pose a "threat" on it's contents. I would go with returning a copy (and that should fit most purposes) as Mark Gravell advised.

Now, since you said you are using this in an ASP.NET environment, it is worth saying that all local and member variables, as well as their member variables, if any, are thread safe.

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