Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to create a 2-dimensional array, without knowing the size of the first dimension.

For example I have an unknown number of rows, when I create an array. Every row represent an account. Exit 4 columns for every row: ID,name,user,password

I tried with jagged array but it is not possible to have:

int[][] jaggedArray = new int[][3];

Also I looked for ArrayList, implementation with clases and a little about Generics.

I'm searching for a solution that can permit easy manipulation of data as:

  • add to list,select,input elements
  • using elements in database queries
  • using as parameters in other functions

Because I'm a newbie in .NET (C#) please provide me with code solutions, instead of generic(look for) solutions

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

IMO, since the "columns" are fixed, declare a class for that:

public class Account
{
    public int ID {get;set;}
    public string Name {get;set;}
    public string User {get;set;}
    public string Password {get;set;} // you meant salted hash, right? ;p
}

now have a :

List<Account> list = new List<Account>();

this has everything you need:

add to list,select,input elements

list.Add etc

using elements in database queries using as parameters in other functions

vague without more info, but you can pass either the Account or invidual values, or the entire list.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you. I have another question: How do I recover the class members values for a specific list item ? –  user848568 Jul 17 '11 at 12:30
1  
@user you mean like list[0].Name ? –  Marc Gravell Jul 17 '11 at 13:04

There is no such thing as dynamic length arrays in .NET. Use a List<> instead.

The array bounds all need to be known when you instantiate an array. What may have confused you is that this seems to be different for jagged arrays, but it's not: since it is an array of arrays, when you instantiate it it will be an array of uninstantiated arrays (e.g. null references). You then need to allocate each of those arrays again to use them.

share|improve this answer

As long as I know, we cant instantiate array without knowing its size. Why dont you try a Array of List? Like this:

List<int>[] a = new List<int>[yourDesireColumnNumber];

With List, add, select, input elements is trivial. If you want to give it as parameter in other functions, just define Type.

share|improve this answer
    
Don't you mean a list of fixed int array's, not a fixed array of list of int's? –  The Scrum Meister Jul 17 '11 at 10:49
2  
@Scrum is right - if you chose this approach (and I wouldn't ;p) it would be a List<int[]>, not a List<int>[] –  Marc Gravell Jul 17 '11 at 10:52
    
Your should try it before judge it. It's a Array of List<int>. By the way, Marc approach is great. ;) I learn from that. –  Khoa Le Jul 17 '11 at 14:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.