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How to efficiently count the number of keys/properties of an object in JavaScript?

var values = [{
    'SPO2': 222.00000,
    'VitalGroupID': 1152,
    'Temperature': 36.6666666666667,
    'DateTimeTaken': '/Date(1301494335000-0400)/',
    'UserID': 1,
    'Height': 182.88,
    'UserName': null,
    'BloodPressureDiastolic': 80,
    'Weight': 100909.090909091,
    'TemperatureMethod': 'Oral',
    'Resprate': null,
    'HeartRate': 111,
    'BloodPressurePosition': 'Standing',
    'VitalSite': 'Popliteal',
    'VitalID': 1135,
    'Laterality': 'Right',
    'HeartRateRegularity': 'Regular',
    'HeadCircumference': '',
    'BloodPressureSystolic': 120,
    'CuffSize': 'XL'
}];

for (i=0; i < values.length; i++) {
        alert(values.length) // gives me 2. 

How can find how many keys my object has?

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marked as duplicate by Frédéric Hamidi, BoltClock, phihag, Rhino, Gilles Feb 8 '12 at 18:25

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Two things: 1) Why are you looping through values.length yet also alerting values.length? 2) I swear values.length is not going to give you 2. –  BoltClock Jul 17 '11 at 11:49
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/5223/… –  felix Jul 17 '11 at 11:50
    
Further to @BoltClock's comment, alert(values.length); gives: 1. And, incidentally, from my own training, the saturated partial arterial pressure of oxygen (SPO2), should be a percentage value of up to 100 (percent, obviously). Where's the 222.00000 coming from? I'm not intending to be confrontational, but I am curious... =) –  David Thomas Jul 17 '11 at 11:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted
var value = {
    'SPO2': 222.00000,
    'VitalGroupID': 1152,
    'Temperature': 36.6666666666667,
    'DateTimeTaken': '/Date(1301494335000-0400)/',
    'UserID': 1,
    'Height': 182.88,
    'UserName': null,
    'BloodPressureDiastolic': 80,
    'Weight': 100909.090909091,
    'TemperatureMethod': 'Oral',
    'Resprate': null,
    'HeartRate': 111,
    'BloodPressurePosition': 'Standing',
    'VitalSite': 'Popliteal',
    'VitalID': 1135,
    'Laterality': 'Right',
    'HeartRateRegularity': 'Regular',
    'HeadCircumference': '',
    'BloodPressureSystolic': 120,
    'CuffSize': 'XL'
};

alert(Object.keys(value).length);
share|improve this answer
    
How can i find the total number of keys if the Object is inside an array –  John Cooper Jul 17 '11 at 12:40
function numKeys(o) {
   var res = 0;
   for (var k in o) {
       if (o.hasOwnProperty(k)) res++;
   }
   return res;
}

or, in newer browsers:

function numKeys(o) {
   return Object.keys(o).length;
}

In your example, values is an array with one element, so you'd call numKeys(values[0]) to find out.

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1  
#2 should be Object.keys(o).length –  Alnitak Jul 17 '11 at 11:57
    
@Alnitak Thanks, fixed. –  phihag Jul 17 '11 at 12:08

try

Object.keys(values).length

see: https://developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Object/keys

for compatiblity

if(!Object.keys) Object.keys = function(o){
 if (o !== Object(o))
      throw new TypeError('Object.keys called on non-object');
 var ret=[],p;
 for(p in o) if(Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(o,p)) ret.push(p);
 return ret;
}

or use:

function numKeys(o){
var i=0;
for(p in o) if(Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(o,p)){ i++};
return i;
}
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added a compatibility code –  gar_onn Jul 17 '11 at 11:53
1  
which you should attribute to its source... –  Alnitak Jul 17 '11 at 11:55

You can iterate and just count:

var i = 0;
for(var key in values[0]) if(values[0].hasOwnProperty(key)) i++;
// now i is amount
share|improve this answer
    
This will include properties defined by the object prototype –  phihag Jul 17 '11 at 11:52
    
@phihag: You're correct but you should not extend Object.prototype anyway. –  pimvdb Jul 17 '11 at 11:53
1  
@pimvdb indeed you shouldn't, but you should program defensively in case one of the libraries you're using has. –  Alnitak Jul 17 '11 at 11:54

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