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boost::condition cond;
boost::recursive_mutex mutex;

for(;;)
{
    D * d = nullptr;

    while( cb.pop(d) ) 
    {

    }

    boost::lock_guard<boost::recursive_mutex> lock( **mutex** );
    cond.wait( **mutex** );
}


while(1)
{
    getchar();

    for( int i = 0 ; i < 1000 ; ++i )
    {
        cb.push(new D(i));           
        boost::lock_guard<boost::recursive_mutex> lock( **mutex** );
        cond.notify_one();
    }
}

My doubt is about the mutex, I only need on mutex object ?

EDIT:

cb is a circular buffer. I want to implement a sort of producer-consumer pattern

do I have to use the same mutex for wait and notify_one ?

share|improve this question
    
What are you trying to do? What is cb? Why are these infinite loops? – bdonlan Jul 17 '11 at 15:06
1  
Oh, and +1 for nullptr :) – bdonlan Jul 17 '11 at 15:06
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Assuming you are using a recent version of boost, boost::condition is the same thing as boost::condition_variable_any, which I believe is the same thing as std::condition_variable_any.

If all that is true, or at least approximately true, your code should compile, but will probably deadlock if you call cond.wait(mutex) with mutex recursively locked.

I recommend instead:

boost::condition_variable cond;
boost::mutex mutex;

// In one thread

for(;;)
{
    D * d = nullptr;

    boost::unique_lock<boost::mutex> lock( mutex );
    while( cb.pop(d) ) 
    {

    }
    while (cb.empty())
       cond.wait( lock );
}

// In another thread

while(1)
{
    getchar();

    for( int i = 0 ; i < 1000 ; ++i )
    {
        boost::lock_guard<boost::mutex> lock( mutex );
        cb.push(new D(i));           
        cond.notify_one();
    }
}

And if your implementation supports it, substitute std for boost. This:

  1. Doesn't use a recursive mutex. Be sure you don't try to lock it recursively.
  2. Uses the mutex to protect access to your container cb.
  3. Uses a while loop around your wait to guard against spurious wakeups.
  4. Uses the much cheaper condition_variable instead of the more expensive (and more flexible) condition_variable_any. I'm not seeing the need for the latter in your example.
share|improve this answer
    
the direct disadvantage of your design is that it blocks the producer to push while the consumer pop..in case of a streaming algo is a little bit inefficient imo, isn't it ? – Guillaume07 Jul 17 '11 at 21:15
    
If your cb doesn't need to be protected from asynchronous access, then by all means move it out from under the protection of the mutex. I have no idea if your cb will do that or not. My main point is that you don't want to wait on a recursively locked mutex using condition_variable_any. – Howard Hinnant Jul 17 '11 at 21:32
    
yes indeed cb don't need.ok I will get a look at condition_variable, thanks for your answer. Oh and to finish, the boost::recursive_mutex, is really more time consuming than boost::mutex ? – Guillaume07 Jul 17 '11 at 21:46
    
The probably depends on the platform and the answer is probably not really. However, condition_variable_any (aka condition) is considerably more expensive than condition_variable. And condition_variable will fail at compile time if you try to wait on it with anything other than a unique_lock<mutex>. – Howard Hinnant Jul 17 '11 at 23:13
    
Oh, but if you wait on a condition_variable_any with a recursive_mutex which has a lock count greater than 1, then your notifying thread will never be able to obtain the lock on that recursive_mutex. Thus you have deadlock (infinitely more time consuming). – Howard Hinnant Jul 17 '11 at 23:17

Correct - you need one mutex; it's purpose will be to make sure that multiple consumers are synchronized with the respect to your one producer.

Also, see http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_41_0/doc/html/thread/synchronization.html

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