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It happens that function uses local buffer to prepare some block of data of limited size and pass it to the other function, just like this:

void foo()
{
  char buffer[MAX_SIZE];
  size_t size = write_fancy_things(buffer);
  bar(buffer, size);
}

However, depending on value of MAX_SIZE, you might be worried about eating too much stack and replace the code with something similar to the following example (but hopefully with more care about memory management):

void foo()
{
  static char *buffer = new char[MAX_SIZE]; 
  size_t size = write_fancy_things(buffer);
  bar(buffer, size);
}

In general case, these two functions should behave the same. However, in the first example, if MAX_SIZE is too large, we're more likely to hit stack limit. Using large values might be fine if you're aware where the function is used, but sometimes you're not.

In the second example we're dealing with additional indirection and buffer is more prone to CPU cache miss, which may be a case if foo lies on a low latency critical path and we expect the cost of preparing the buffer to be very low in most cases.

What size would you consider as being too large to put on stack? Also is there any penalty on putting big block of data on the stack, but using only small portion of it?

EDIT: The write_fancy _things is just a synonym for saying *I'm writing some data to the buffer, between 1 and MAX_SIZE bytes*. You can think about the second foo example as a class method, and the static pointer as a class member allocated in constructor. I've just probably oversimplified things, but didn't want to introduce more complexity than needed and focus on the stack concerns.

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Are you sure that your new is using "the heap"? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 17 '11 at 14:40
2  
It's using the heap. Badly. In a way that gives almost none of the advantages of heap allocation. –  bdonlan Jul 17 '11 at 14:49
    
@Tomalak now I'm not; if not heap than what? –  tomasz Jul 17 '11 at 14:57
1  
@bdonlan this is the whole point, the only advantage is that I'm not using stack space, which I prefer as buffer is a local variable. So I start putting char buffer[10000... and every following zero makes me worry. –  tomasz Jul 17 '11 at 15:54
1  
@tg: Just don't call it the heap. Call it dynamically allocated memory. It fits with its actually type (automatic/static/dynamic/thread). –  Loki Astari Jul 17 '11 at 16:19

4 Answers 4

There is no penalty for putting data on the stack because you are just decrementing the stack pointer.

The stack size can be modified using OS utilities, so I would not worry about big sizes up to about 1MB.

but I would worry about recursive calls. They may simply not happen because they will blow up the stack.

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The two are not even remotely identical. The second one uses the same buffer for all calls, the first uses a new buffer, meaning that the second is not thread-safe.

The style is horrendous. If write_fancy_things only uses X many bytes, and X is unknown at compile-time, then dynamically allocate X bytes. Do not allocate some hopeful maximum size on the stack and do not use a static buffer of a larger hopeful maximum size. Use a vector of the correct type, resize it to the appropriate size, and then use that buffer.

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+1. There is no use whatsoever for dynamically allocating a statically-sized buffer using a static pointer. –  larsmans Jul 17 '11 at 14:51
    
well, maybe I oversimplified things in my pseudocode... write_fancy_things was about to say, that I'm going to write somewhat between 1 and MAX_SIZE bytes, all values are possible, all will be hit, but mainly a small one will be used. good point with being not thread-safe, but it's really not a case here. –  tomasz Jul 17 '11 at 14:55
    
If it's mainly going to be a small allocation, why not have write_fancy_things do the allocation? And how big is MAX_SIZE? –  bdonlan Jul 17 '11 at 14:59

If you start worrying about size go for the heap, otherwise stack.

all things considered.

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If there was a problem clashing with the frame boundary (because MAX_SIZE was way to big) then convert to std::vector

void foo()
{
  std::vector<char> buffer(MAX_SIZE);
  size_t size = write_fancy_things(&buffer[0]);
  bar(&buffer[0], size);
}

To be blunt your version is a non starter.

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While this is probably the most safe and flexible approach, it's just slow. As I pointed out, foo lies on a low latency critical path and stack buffer works perfectly fine. However, as my code is a part of library which will be used by others, isn't it some kind of abusing while using, let's say, 100KB of stack within single call? –  tomasz Jul 17 '11 at 16:30
    
@tg: one option is to punt the problem upstairs - document that the library call requires a 100kb buffer, let the user supply that if they want to, and dynamically allocate it otherwise. Then any user that can measure an overall performance improvement for their app by passing a buffer on the stack can feel happy. If the amount of space actually used is unpredictable, bounded by MAX_SIZE, but typically much smaller, then you probably wouldn't want to use vector because it very slowly zero-initializes the buffer, rather scoped_array or similar. –  Steve Jessop Jul 17 '11 at 16:44

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