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I came into a really strange situation. I have the following setup:

Parent window has an object "bar" which includes an xml document and few other properties:

<html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript">
var foo=null; //used in most report pages
var bar=function(document, boo){
    this.doc=document;
    this.boo=boo;
    this.baz="serge";
};
</script>
<head>  
<body>
    <iframe src="_child1.html"></iframe>
</body>
</html>

First child frame loads a simple xml file by ajax:

<html>
<head>
<script src="../lib/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
$.ajax({
        url: "books.xml",
        type: "get",
        dataType: "xml",        
        success: function(data) {
            var boo = {
                name: "boo"
            };
            parent.foo = new parent.bar(data, boo);         
            alert(parent.foo.boo.name);
            alert(parent.foo.baz);
            alert(parent.foo.doc.firstChild.nodeName);
            window.location = "_child2.html";
        }
    });
</script>
</head>

<body>
    child1
</body>
</html>

The XML is:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?>
<bookstore>
    Vaidyanathan Nagarajan
</bookstore>

On success it creates a "bar" instance in the parent window and stores it in the "foo" variable which again resides in the parent window.

Then it outputs those properties (successfully) and redirects to a second child frame.

Second child frame tries to access the "foo" object in the parent frame and output its properties:

<html>
<head>
<script src="../lib/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
alert(parent.foo.boo.name);
alert(parent.foo.baz);
alert(parent.foo.doc.firstChild.nodeName);
</script>
</head>

<body>
    child2
</body>
</html>

And now the interesting stuff happens: in FF and Chrome we see the 3 properties fire two times: once in _child1 and secondly in _child2. In IE9 however, we see only 5 alerts!

And the reason for this is that parent.foo.doc throws "Permission denied" for some reason.

I believe that the reason is that somehow IE "remembers" that the xml document was created in the first child frame (perhaps for performance reasons) and when the second child frame tries to access that object IE isn't able to find it (or stores it in a restricted memory stack).

Furthermore, when I tried this scenario without redirecting - just putting those two child frames in the parent frame together - the second child frame had no problem accessing the parents' xml doc.

One workaround could be to clone those xml documents inside the "parents" before assigning, but we have many scenarios like this and first I would like to ask whether someone has a better idea?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Internet Explorer will absolutely not let you get away with using a JavaScript object allocated in a separate page once that separate page has been garbage-collected. You can pass primitive values, but I've had problems (a long long time ago, but still) with "Date" instances passed between frames.

A trick you can pull is to call a function in the parent page to create your object from primitive values:

// in parent:

function newBar(what, ever) {
  return new bar(what, ever);
}

// in the frame page:

parent.foo = parent.newBar("what", "ever");

I think that'll insulate you from problems, because the object will be allocated with the Object constructor on the parent page, and not the one in the frame page. In a former life the application I worked on was a vast sprawling thing involving a zillion iframes (for dialogs, warnings, all sorts of stuff). I had this problem all the time, and keeping things clean was painful enough that I've sworn off using iframes for that kind of stuff.

share|improve this answer
    
It's strange you've had these problems with older versions of IE, our web-app runs like this for a long time and only now with IE9 we came across this issue. Your solution sounds like a good idea, however I was hoping to find some tweak to solve this globally. If what you suggest will work I will need to search through all of our code for such esoteric cases. And yes, frames will definitely go out in future versions. – krulik Jul 18 '11 at 10:07
    
Another thing - as you see in my example the problem is only with xml document instances, other properties are linked to the parent like they should. – krulik Jul 18 '11 at 10:37
    
Thank you for your answer! Its working. I'm accepting it even though I wanted a solution that would be "transparent" to the programmer. Something like IE9.bug = false; :) Now because of IE9 we need to remember to create objects in this manner and every new programmer in our team has to learn this too. – krulik Jul 18 '11 at 13:36

Just to share a alternative solution that could help others.

I was getting the permission denied issue in IE 9 for our web application due to the new handling for iframe object in IE9 (stated here http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg622929%28v=VS.85%29.aspx?ppud=4)

For my case where the page within an iframe (iframe A) was refreshed, existing value stored in the page was freed. When an javascript call was made from another iframe (iframe B) to access object in iframe A, it was getting "permission denied" error and script stop execution.

At last I use javascript try catch to capture the error and let the script to run further instead of stop execution.

  try {
      var testObj = testObjArray['Object in iframe A'];
  } catch(err) {
      alert(err);
  }

Hope this alternative solution can help others. :)

share|improve this answer

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