Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a problem here where I am not sure how to handle it. Firstly I am beginner. I have two constructors for a class and two reference variables declared but I can not use both references in one constructor. If cons1() is called I need ref1 to be used and if cons2 is called I need ref2 to be used. The problem is in what should I reference ref1 to, when cons2 is called and similarly what ref2 should reference when cons1 is called. I am not sure how to initialize these references. It can't be NULL. I am not sure if its a good idea to point to some invalid implementation. Should it? Is that even an option? How is such a problem handled in c++?

// A.cpp
Class A
A(Object1& a) : ref1(a) {}   - here how should ref2 be handled?
A(Object2& b) : ref2(b) {}- here what should ref1 reference?

// A.h
Object1& ref1
Object2& ref2

I need to use references here. I understand we can use pointers instead of references but the question is specific to using references.

share|improve this question
    
Can you improve on the question title? We know it's a question already because you posted it, and we know it's C++ because it's so tagged. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 17 '11 at 19:28
2  
"I need to use references here" -- Why place arbitrary restrictions on yourself? If it's really the case, then I'll vote to close as too localized. If this is a real programming problem, we use the right tool for the job, we don't place arbitrary restrictions on ourselves. –  Benjamin Lindley Jul 17 '11 at 20:04
1  
Its not just a localized problem though the problem did arise in my personal work. The problem in general is how we handle such situations in c++. If using pointers in place of refs is the only solution then we can close it out saying thats the soln. –  leonidus Jul 17 '11 at 20:13
    
@leonidus It's not the only way, it's however a very idiomatic one. –  Luc Danton Jul 17 '11 at 20:16
    
Too localized for sure. The necessity to use references is purely arbitrary and not useful for general C++ programming. –  DeadMG Jul 17 '11 at 20:36
add comment

4 Answers

Since ref1 and ref2 are optional (not required), then it is better to use pointers, instead of references :

class A
{
  public:
    A(Object1& a) : ref1(&a), ref2(NULL) {}
    A(Object2& b) : ref1(NULL),ref2(&b) {}

 Object1 *ref1;
 Object2 *ref2;
};

but later you must check if the ref1 and ref2 are NULL.

share|improve this answer
    
This answer is correct. Still, it seems like a poor approach to take in code. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 17 '11 at 19:29
    
@Tomalak Why? I guess you could use boost::optional –  BЈовић Jul 17 '11 at 19:31
2  
Because the object is being given wildly different semantics based on nothing more than the type of a constructor argument. You have to be really careful that there are no implicit conversions between Object1 and Object2 or you'll get unexpected behaviour, and in every function in A you're going to have to check which is used and duplicate code all over the place depending on which it is. Depending on the wider use case, an interface-style base class and two derived class variants would probably make far more sense. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 17 '11 at 19:33
    
@OP: you could also use dummy objects in the same way linked lists uses a "sentinel node" –  J T Jul 17 '11 at 19:37
    
Assume that I need to use references here. –  leonidus Jul 17 '11 at 19:45
show 5 more comments

WARNING: the following is stupid and contrived. Why? Because so is the requirement to use references.

class base {
    virtual
    ~base();

    virtual
    void
    stuff_happens() = 0;
};
base::~base() = default;

class case1: public base {
public:
    explicit
    case1(Object1& o)
        : ref(o)
    {}

    void
    stuff_happens()
    {
        // we use ref here
    }

private:
    Object1& ref;
};

class case2: public base {
public:
    explicit
    case2(Object2& o)
        : ref(o)
    {}

    void
    stuff_happens()
    {
        // we use ref here
    }

private:
    Object2& ref;
};

std::unique_ptr<base>
make_base(Object1& o)
{ return std::unique_ptr<base>(new case1(o)); }

std::unique_ptr<base>
make_base(Object2& o)
{ return std::unique_ptr<base>(new case2(o)); }

// ...
{
    auto p = condition ? make_base(ref1) : make_base(ref2);
    p->stuff_happens();
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

The correct answer has already been given: switch to pointers. References in this case provide zero benefit, and as you have seen have a huge downside. Your design is dubious to begin with; let's not complicate things by introducing additional bad requirements.

However, if you insist on using references, the only possible solution is to introduce a sentinel value of some sort.

struct A {
    A(Object1& o) : obj1(o), obj2(null2) { }
    A(Object2& o) : obj1(null1), obj2(o) { }

    void function() { 
        if(&obj1 == &null1)
            //Object2 constructor
        else
            //Object1 constructor
    }

  private:
    Object1& obj1;
    Object2& obj2;

    static Object1 null1;
    static Object2 null2;
};

//implementation file
Object1 A::null1;
Object2 A::null2;

This method depends on Object1 and Object2 both having default constructors, or otherwise having a sensible default value for the sentinels. null1 and null2 will both exist for the entire life of the application, so if they acquire any resources, you will essentially have a leak.

You also have to be a lot more careful with invalid uses of the sentinels, because such access is [in the general case] perfectly safe. A strong argument can be made that it is better for bugs to result in undefined behavior that is likely to crash, than for them to result in well defined behavior that is likely to simply produce unexpected results.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you need to have NULL values, you should switch from a reference to a pointer. Some compilers support NULL references, but this is bad style and not portable and should therefore be avoided.

share|improve this answer
    
All compilers support NULL reference. The problem is - it is an UB to dereference a NULL reference object. –  BЈовић Jul 17 '11 at 19:30
1  
What compilers? By definition a reference (in C++) can't be NULL –  Loki Astari Jul 17 '11 at 19:31
    
I believe NULL is defined in stdlib.h.... –  Prime Jul 17 '11 at 19:31
2  
@VJo: "All compilers support NULL reference"?! No. It's UB to dereference a NULL pointer, and you cannot obtain a NULL reference any other way. So the UB occurs before this mythical NULL reference support could ever come into play. (And what does it mean to dereference a reference, exactly?) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 17 '11 at 19:34
    
@dragonwrenn: Don't use deprecated headers. That's cstdlib in C++. Also, read this. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 17 '11 at 19:35
show 4 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.